Hermarchus

Hermarchus the Epicurean
Hermarchus or Hermarch (Ἕρμαρχoς, Hermarkhos; c. 325-c. 250 BC ), sometimes incorrectly written Hermachus (Ἕρμαχoς, Hermakhos), was an Epicurean philosopher.wikipedia
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Epicureanism

EpicureanEpicureansEpicurean philosophy
250 BC ), sometimes incorrectly written Hermachus (Ἕρμαχoς, Hermakhos), was an Epicurean philosopher.
After the death of Epicurus, his school was headed by Hermarchus; later many Epicurean societies flourished in the Late Hellenistic era and during the Roman era (such as those in Antiochia, Alexandria, Rhodes, and Ercolano).

Epicurus

EpicureanEpicurean paradoxEpicurean doctrine
He was the disciple and successor of Epicurus as head of the school. Hermarchus was a son of Agemarchus, a poor man of Mytilene (in insular Greece), and was at first brought up as a rhetorician, but afterwards became a faithful disciple of Epicurus, who left to him his garden, and appointed him his successor as the head of his school, about 270 BC.
The primary members were Hermarchus, the financier Idomeneus, Leonteus and his wife Themista, the satirist Colotes, the mathematician Polyaenus of Lampsacus, and Metrodorus of Lampsacus, the most famous popularizer of Epicureanism.

Mytilene

MytiliniMityleneMoria Refugee Camp
Hermarchus was a son of Agemarchus, a poor man of Mytilene (in insular Greece), and was at first brought up as a rhetorician, but afterwards became a faithful disciple of Epicurus, who left to him his garden, and appointed him his successor as the head of his school, about 270 BC.

Metrodorus of Lampsacus (the younger)

MetrodorusMetrodorus of Lampsacus
Diogenes Laërtius mentioned from a letter written by Epicurus, "All my books to be given to Hermarchus. And if anything should happen to Hermarchus before the children of Metrodorus grow up, Amynomachus and Timocrates shall give from the funds bequeathed by me, so far as possible, enough for their several needs, as long as they are well ordered. And let them provide for the rest according to my arrangements; that everything may be carried out, so far as it lies in their power."
He left behind him a son named Epicurus, and a daughter, whom Epicurus, in his will, entrusted to the guardianship of Amynomachus and Timocrates of Potamus, to be brought up under the joint care of themselves and Hermarchus, and provided for out of the property which he left behind him.

Plato

Plato's dialoguesDialogues of PlatoPlatonic dialogues
He wrote works directed against Plato, Aristotle, and Empedocles.

Aristotle

AristotelianAristotelesAristote
He wrote works directed against Plato, Aristotle, and Empedocles.

Empedocles

Empedocles of AcragasEmpedocleanLove and Strife
He wrote works directed against Plato, Aristotle, and Empedocles.

Porphyry (philosopher)

PorphyryPorphyriusPorphyry of Tyre
A fragment from his Against Empedocles, preserved by Porphyry, discusses the need for law in society.

Deity

deitiesgodsgod
His views on the nature of the gods are quoted by Philodemus. Philodemus in his On the Way of Life of the Gods, quotes the view of Hermarchus that the gods breathe, because the gods are living beings and all living things breathe.

Philodemus

Philodemus of GadaraPhilodemi de MusicAPhilodemos
His views on the nature of the gods are quoted by Philodemus. Philodemus in his On the Way of Life of the Gods, quotes the view of Hermarchus that the gods breathe, because the gods are living beings and all living things breathe.

Greece

GreekHellenic RepublicGreeks
Hermarchus was a son of Agemarchus, a poor man of Mytilene (in insular Greece), and was at first brought up as a rhetorician, but afterwards became a faithful disciple of Epicurus, who left to him his garden, and appointed him his successor as the head of his school, about 270 BC.

Rhetoric

rhetoricianrhetorrhetorical
Hermarchus was a son of Agemarchus, a poor man of Mytilene (in insular Greece), and was at first brought up as a rhetorician, but afterwards became a faithful disciple of Epicurus, who left to him his garden, and appointed him his successor as the head of his school, about 270 BC.

Cicero

Marcus Tullius CiceroCiceronianTully
Cicero has preserved a letter of Epicurus addressed to him.

Diogenes Laërtius

Diogenes LaertiusDiogenesDiog. Laërtius
Diogenes Laërtius mentioned from a letter written by Epicurus, "All my books to be given to Hermarchus. And if anything should happen to Hermarchus before the children of Metrodorus grow up, Amynomachus and Timocrates shall give from the funds bequeathed by me, so far as possible, enough for their several needs, as long as they are well ordered. And let them provide for the rest according to my arrangements; that everything may be carried out, so far as it lies in their power."

Murder

first-degree murderfirst degree murdersecond-degree murder
In this fragment, Hermarchus discusses the reasons for punishment for murder.

Society

societiessocialsocietal
He argues that early law-makers were guided by the principle that murder was not good for society, and were able to educate other people that this was a rational principle.

Progress

social progressscientific progressIdea of Progress
For Hermarchus, this was an example of social progress and an increase in rationality.

Rationality

rationalrational thoughtrational thinking
For Hermarchus, this was an example of social progress and an increase in rationality.

Breathing

breathventilationrespiration
Philodemus in his On the Way of Life of the Gods, quotes the view of Hermarchus that the gods breathe, because the gods are living beings and all living things breathe.

Conversation

discussionbanteraddressee
Philodemus goes on to say that, according to Hermarchus, the gods must talk to one another, because conversation is conducive to happiness:

History of gardening

garden historyGarden historianGardens
Epicurus had a garden where he walked and taught, and he bequeathed it to Hermarchus of Mytilene.

Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers

Lives of Eminent PhilosophersLives of the Eminent PhilosophersLives
The work contains incidental remarks on many other philosophers, and there are useful accounts concerning Hegesias, Anniceris, and Theodorus (Cyrenaics); Persaeus (Stoic); and Metrodorus and Hermarchus (Epicureans).

Polystratus the Epicurean

Polystratus
He succeeded Hermarchus as head of the sect c. 250 BC, and was himself succeeded by Dionysius of Lamptrai when he died 219 or 218 BC.

Hedonism

hedonistichedonisthedonic
After the death of Epicurus, his school was headed by Hermarchus; later many Epicurean societies flourished in the Late Hellenistic era and during the Roman era (such as those in Antiochia, Alexandria, Rhodes and Ercolano).