A report on Hermetic Qabalah

The Sephirothic tree showing the lightning flash and the paths
The Qabalistic Tree of Life in the Servants of the Light organisation's Hermetic theory
Syncretism of Cabala, Alchemy, Astrology and other esoteric Hermetic disciplines in Stephan Michelspacher's Cabala, Spiegel der Kunst und Natur: in Alchymia (1615)
The "Kircher Tree": Athanasius Kircher's 1652 depiction of the Tree of Life, based on a 1625 version by Philippe d'Aquin. This is still the most common arrangement of the Sephiroth and paths on the tree in Hermetic Qabalah

Western esoteric tradition involving mysticism and the occult.

- Hermetic Qabalah
The Sephirothic tree showing the lightning flash and the paths

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Rose Cross of the Golden Dawn.

Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn

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Secret society devoted to the study and practice of the occult, metaphysics, and paranormal activities during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Secret society devoted to the study and practice of the occult, metaphysics, and paranormal activities during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Rose Cross of the Golden Dawn.
Folio 13 of the Cipher Manuscripts
Samuel Liddell MacGregor Mathers in Egyptian setup performing a ritual in the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn

The First Order taught esoteric philosophy based on the Hermetic Qabalah and personal development through study and awareness of the four classical elements, as well as the basics of astrology, tarot divination, and geomancy.

Aleister Crowley in 1925

Aleister Crowley

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English occultist, ceremonial magician, poet, painter, novelist, and mountaineer.

English occultist, ceremonial magician, poet, painter, novelist, and mountaineer.

Aleister Crowley in 1925
Aleister Crowley in 1925
Aleister Crowley was born as Edward Alexander Crowley at 30 Clarendon Square in Royal Leamington Spa, Warwickshire, on 12 October 1875.
Crowley in Golden Dawn garb, 1910
Crowley during the K2 Expedition, 1902
Kanchenjunga, as seen from Darjeeling
Crowley in ceremonial garb, 1912
May Morn, one of Crowley's paintings from his time in the US. He explained it thus: "The painting represents the dawning of the day following a witches' celebration as described in Faust. The witch is hanged, as she deserves, and the satyr looks out from behind a tree."
A drawing by Crowley of Lam
The dilapidated Abbey of Thelema in Cefalù, Sicily in 2017
Crowley specified that Grady McMurtry succeed his chosen successor as Head of O.T.O., Karl Germer.
Aleister Crowley's rendition of the Unicursal Hexagram, the symbol of Thelema

He also wrote Liber 777, a book of magical and Qabalistic correspondences that borrowed from Mathers and Bennett.

Aleister Crowley in 1912

Thelema

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Western esoteric and occult social or spiritual philosophy and new religious movement founded in the early 1900s by Aleister Crowley , an English writer, mystic, occultist, and ceremonial magician.

Western esoteric and occult social or spiritual philosophy and new religious movement founded in the early 1900s by Aleister Crowley , an English writer, mystic, occultist, and ceremonial magician.

Aleister Crowley in 1912
François Rabelais
Portrait of Francis Dashwood, 11th Baron le Despencer, by William Hogarth from the late 1750s
Aleister Crowley's rendition of the unicursal hexagram
The Stèle of Revealing [front] depicting Nuit, Hadit as the winged globe, Ra-Hoor-Khuit seated on his throne, and the creator of the Stèle, the scribe Ankh-af-na-khonsu
Parsons in 1941
Grant in the library of his Golders Green home, taken by Jan Magee in 1978
The mysterious 'grid' page of Liber AL's manuscript
The Tree of Life, important in the magical order A∴A∴ as the degrees of advancement in are related to it

He also associated Thelemic spiritual practice with concepts rooted in occultism, yoga, and Eastern and Western mysticism, especially the Qabalah.

Aleister Crowley in Golden Dawn garb

Ceremonial magic

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Ceremonial magic (ritual magic, high magic or learned magic) encompasses a wide variety of rituals of magic.

Ceremonial magic (ritual magic, high magic or learned magic) encompasses a wide variety of rituals of magic.

Aleister Crowley in Golden Dawn garb
Woodcut illustration from an edition of Pliny the Elder's Naturalis Historia (1582)
Portrait of Francis Barrett, author of the book The Magus (1801)
Éliphas Lévi
Samuel Liddell MacGregor Mathers (1854–1918), in Egyptian costume, performs a ritual of Isis in the rites of the Golden Dawn
Aleister Crowley, c. 1912
An illustration of Fortune's hometown, Llandudno, in 1860
Parsons in 1941
Grant in the library of his Golders Green home (taken by Jan Magee in 1978)
The mysterious 'grid' page of Liber AL's manuscript. "for in the chance shape of the letters and their position to one another: in these are mysteries that no Beast shall divine. ... Then this line drawn is a key: then this circle squared in its failure is a key also. And Abrahadabra."
This design for an amulet comes from the Black Pullet grimoire.
Classic magic words
An example of the magic circle and triangle of King Solomon

Popularized by the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, it draws on such schools of philosophical and occult thought as Hermetic Qabalah, Enochian magic, Thelema, and the magic of various grimoires.

Jewish Kabbalists portrayed in 1641; woodcut on paper. Saxon University Library, Dresden.

Kabbalah

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Esoteric method, discipline and school of thought in Jewish mysticism.

Esoteric method, discipline and school of thought in Jewish mysticism.

Jewish Kabbalists portrayed in 1641; woodcut on paper. Saxon University Library, Dresden.
Kabbalistic prayer book from Italy, 1803. Jewish Museum of Switzerland, Basel.
Latin translation of Gikatilla's Shaarei Ora
The Ark of the Covenant in Solomon's Temple was the seat for God's presence. Ezekiel and Isaiah had prophetic visions of the angelic heavenly Chariot and Divine Throne
Grave of Rabbi Akiva in Tiberias. He features in Hekhalot mystical literature, and as one of the four who entered the Pardes
The grave of Shimon bar Yochai in Meron before 1899. A Talmudic Tanna, he is the mystical teacher in the central Kabbalistic work, the Zohar
The 13th-century eminence of Nachmanides, a classic rabbinic figure, gave Kabbalah mainstream acceptance through his Torah commentary
The leading scholars of Safed in 16th-century invigorated mainstream Judaism through new legal, liturgical, exegetical and Lurianic-mythological developments.
Synagogue Beit El Jerusalem. Oriental Judaism has its own chain of Kabbalah
The 16th-century Maharal of Prague articulated a mystical exegesis in philosophical language
Moshe Chaim Luzzatto, a leading Italian kabbalist, also wrote secular works, which the Haskalah see as the start of modern Hebrew literature
The Vilna Gaon, 18th-century leader of rabbinic opposition to Hasidism—a Kabbalist who opposed Hasidic doctrinal and practical innovations
Synagogue of the Baal Shem Tov, founder of Hasidism, in Medzhybizh (Ukraine). It gave a new phase to Jewish mysticism, seeking its popularisation through internal correspondence.
The Kabbalist (c. 1910–1920), portrait of an Hasidic man in Jewish religious clothing performed by the Austro-Hungarian Jewish painter Isidor Kaufmann (Jewish Museum, New York)
Metaphorical scheme of emanated spiritual worlds within the Ein Sof
Scheme of descending Sephirot in three columns, as a tree with roots above and branches below
In the 16–17th centuries Kabbalah was popularised through a new genre of ethical literature, related to Kabbalistic meditation
Amulet from the 15th century. Theosophical kabbalists, especially Luria, censored contemporary Practical Kabbalah, but allowed amulets by Sages
Joseph Karo's role as both legalist and mystic underscores Kabbalah's spiritualisation of normative Jewish observance
Building on Kabbalah's conception of the soul, Abraham Abulafia's meditations included the "inner illumination of" the human form
16th-century graves of Safed, Galilee. The messianic focus of its mystical renaissance culminated in Lurianic thought.
Title page of first printed edition of the Zohar, main sourcebook of Kabbalah, from Mantua, Italy in 1558
Golden age of Spanish Judaism on the Knesset Menorah, Maimonides holding Aristotle's work
Kabbalah mysticism on the Knesset Menorah, which shared some similarities of theory with Jewish Neoplatonists
Tikkun for reading through the night of Shavuot, a popular Jewish custom from the Safed Kabbalists
A version of Lekhah Dodi song to welcome the Shabbat, a cross denomination Jewish custom from Kabbalah

The definition of Kabbalah varies according to the tradition and aims of those following it, from its origin in medieval Judaism to its later adaptations in Western esotericism (Christian Kabbalah and Hermetic Qabalah).

Builders of the Adytum logo

Builders of the Adytum

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School of the Western mystery tradition based in Los Angeles which is registered as a non-profit tax-exempt religious organization.

School of the Western mystery tradition based in Los Angeles which is registered as a non-profit tax-exempt religious organization.

Builders of the Adytum logo

The B.O.T.A. teaches by correspondence, covering esoteric psychology, occult tarot, Hermetic Qabalah, astrology, and meditation techniques.

Qliphoth

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In the Zohar, Lurianic Kabbalah and Hermetic Qabalah, the qliphoth/qlippoth/qlifot or kelipot ( qəlīpōṯ, originally Aramaic: qəlīpīn, plural of qəlīpā; literally "peels", "shells", or "husks"), are the representation of evil or impure spiritual forces in Jewish mysticism, the polar opposites of the holy Sefirot.

Title of Reuchlin's De arte cabalistica libri tres, iam denua adcurate revisi, 1530.

Christian Kabbalah

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Christian Kabbalah arose during the Renaissance due to Christian scholars' interest in the mysticism of Jewish Kabbalah, which they interpreted according to Christian theology.

Christian Kabbalah arose during the Renaissance due to Christian scholars' interest in the mysticism of Jewish Kabbalah, which they interpreted according to Christian theology.

Title of Reuchlin's De arte cabalistica libri tres, iam denua adcurate revisi, 1530.
front page of Francesco Giorgi's De harmonia mundi.
Sephirotic diagram from Knorr von Rosenroth's Kabbala Denudata.

It is often transliterated as Cabala (also Cabbala) to distinguish it from the Jewish form and from Hermetic Qabalah.

Fortune as a teenager; the image dates from approximately 1905

Dion Fortune

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British occultist, ceremonial magician, novelist and author.

British occultist, ceremonial magician, novelist and author.

Fortune as a teenager; the image dates from approximately 1905
An illustration of Fortune's hometown, Llandudno, in 1860
Glastonbury Tor
Fortune joined the Theosophical Society (logo pictured) but split from them on believing that they undermined the importance of Jesus as an Ascended Master
Number 3 Queensborough Terrace, Bayswater: headquarters of the Society of Inner Light from 1924
Fortune's grave in the churchyard of St. John's Church, Glastonbury
The church of St. John the Baptist, Glastonbury; Fortune's funeral was performed here by the Reverend L. S. Lewis, and her body interred in the Wells Road cemetery nearby

She was not enamoured with the ceremonial magic system that had been developed by the Golden Dawn, however it did provide her with the grounding in the study of the Hermetic Qabalah which would exert a great influence over her esoteric world-view.

A promotional image of Israel Regardie

Israel Regardie

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English occultist, ceremonial magician, and writer who spent much of his life in the United States.

English occultist, ceremonial magician, and writer who spent much of his life in the United States.

A promotional image of Israel Regardie
A promotional image of Israel Regardie
Regardie became secretary for Aleister Crowley
Regardie was on friendly terms with Grady McMurtry (pictured); the latter asked for Regardie's blessing before relaunching the Ordo Templi Orientis

Living in England, he wrote two books on the Qabalah, A Garden of Pomegranates and The Tree of Life.