Hernán Pérez de Quesada

HernánbrotherHernán Pérezhis brotherbrother Hernánhis brother HernánJiménez & Pérez de Quesada
Hernán Pérez de Quesada, sometimes spelled as De Quezada, (~1500 – 1544) was a Spanish conquistador.wikipedia
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Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada

Gonzalo Jimenez de QuesadaGonzalo de QuesadaJimenéz de Quesáda
Second in command of the army of his elder brother, Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada, Hernán was part of the first European expedition towards the inner highlands of the Colombian Andes.
He had three younger brothers; Hernán and Francisco, who also were conquistadors, and Melchor, and a sister, Andrea.

Tisquesusa

As second in command under his brother, in the previous years zipas Tisquesusa and Sagipa and Tundama of Duitama had suffered a similar fate.
Tisquesusa was the ruler of the southern Muisca Confederation at the time of the Spanish conquest of the Muisca, when the troops led by Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada and his brother entered the central Colombian highlands.

Bogotá

BogotaBogotá, ColombiaBogotá, D.C.
After returning from his expeditions to the south reaching Quito, where he reunited with his younger brother Francisco, both De Quesadas went back to Bogotá.
Defending Funza with a reduced army of guecha warriors against the heavily exhausted but heavily armed strangers, his reign fell in the hands of Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada and his younger brother Hernán Pérez on April 20, 1537.

Aquiminzaque

Under the command of Hernán Pérez de Quesada the last Muisca ruler; zaque Aquiminzaque were publicly decapitated.
At first Aquiminzaque converted to catholicism but when he realized the true motives of the Spanish conquerors over the Muisca people he revolted against them and undermined the initial rule of Hernán Pérez de Quesada, brother of Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada.

Sutatausa

Suta
Hernán founded Sutatausa, Cundinamarca, and aided in the conquest of various indigenous groups, such as the Chimila, Muisca, Panche, Lache, U'wa, Sutagao and others.
Modern Sutatausa was founded on June 24 (Saint John's day), 1537 by Hernán Pérez de Quesada, brother of conquistador Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada, who on the same day founded Tenza.

El Dorado

EldoradoEl DaraAkator
On April 6, 1536, triggered by the stories of the mythical "City of Gold" El Dorado, Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada organised two groups of conquistadors towards the inner highlands of the Colombian Andes, as first European explorers.
After his brother Gonzalo had left for Spain in May 1539, Spanish conquistador Hernán Pérez de Quesada set out a new expedition in September 1540, leaving with 270 Spanish soldiers and countless indigenous porters to explore the Llanos Orientales.

Sutagao people

SutagaoSutagao (1)Uzathama
Hernán founded Sutatausa, Cundinamarca, and aided in the conquest of various indigenous groups, such as the Chimila, Muisca, Panche, Lache, U'wa, Sutagao and others.
Conquistador Hernán Pérez de Quesada, brother of Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada submitted the Sutagao to the new rule of the New Kingdom of Granada.

List of conquistadors in Colombia

conquistadorconquistadorsGonzalo Suárez Rendón
The city of Tunja, in the times of the Muisca called Hunza, was founded on 1541 by Gonzalo Suárez Rendón in an expedition ordered by Hernán de Quesada. One of his soldiers, Lázaro Fonte, the lover of Zoratama, died due to the natural dangers of the jungle.
Important conquistadors and explorers were Alonso de Ojeda, who landed first at Colombian soil and founded the first settlement Santa Cruz, Rodrigo de Bastidas, who founded the oldest still remaining city Santa Marta, Pedro de Heredia, who founded the important city of Cartagena in 1533, Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada, who was the leader of the first and main expedition into the Andes (1536–1538), with his brother second in command and many other conquistadors, 80% of whom who didn't survive, and Nikolaus Federmann and Sebastián de Belalcázar who entered the Colombian interior from the northwest and south respectively.

New Kingdom of Granada

New GranadaRoyal Audience of Santa Fe de BogotáAudiencia of Bogotá
The newly established country, part of the Spanish Empire was called New Kingdom of Granada, after the place of birth of the brothers De Quesada in Andalusia; Kingdom of Granada.
After Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada left for Spain in May 1539, the reign of the colony was transferred to his brother Hernán.

Chipatá, Santander

Chipatá
The troops led by the De Quesadas passed through among other settlements Tamalameque, Barrancabermeja and Chipatá where the Spanish for the first time learnt to drink chicha, the fermented alcoholic beverage of the Muisca.
Modern Chipatá was the first settlement founded by conquistador Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada and his brother, on March 8, 1537, during his expedition of conquest.

Nikolaus Federmann

Nicolaus FedermannNicolás de FedermanFedermann
De Quesada was not pleased to hear about the advancement of another group of conquistadors in the east, led by Nikolaus Federmann, coming from later Venezuela across the Llanos Orientales.
Gonzalo assigned his brother Hernán Pérez de Quesada as interim governor of the New Kingdom of Granada and chose the first mayor and council for the capital.

Pasca

On April 6th 1536 conquistadors Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada and his brother started the strenuous march into the inner highlands of Colombia.

Tunja

HunzaTunja, ColombiaTunja, Boyacá
The city of Tunja, in the times of the Muisca called Hunza, was founded on 1541 by Gonzalo Suárez Rendón in an expedition ordered by Hernán de Quesada.
The latter, along with his tribe were taken as an encomienda by Hernán Pérez de Quesada.

Spanish conquest of the Muisca

Spanish conquestSpanishconquest
The leader of the first and main expedition under Spanish flag was Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada, with his brother Hernán second in command.

Motavita

Conquistador Hernán Pérez de Quesada, brother of Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada, reached Motavita in 1540.

Nevado del Sumapaz

In the 16th century, the European expeditions of Federmann (1539), López Montalvo de Lugo (1540) Hernán Pérez de Quesada (1540) and Gonzalo Jimenez de Quesada (1570) passed through the region of Nevado del Sumapaz.

Sativasur

Sátiva
The Spanish conquistadores who conquered the area in 1540 were Gonzalo Suárez Rendón and Hernán Pérez de Quesada.

Zoratama

Lázaro Fonte
One of his soldiers, Lázaro Fonte, the lover of Zoratama, died due to the natural dangers of the jungle.
He formed part of the army of Hernán Pérez de Quesada, brother of Gonzalo.

Conquistador

conquistadorsconquistadoresSpanish conquistadors
Hernán Pérez de Quesada, sometimes spelled as De Quezada, (~1500 – 1544) was a Spanish conquistador.

Andes

AndeanAndes MountainsAndean region
Second in command of the army of his elder brother, Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada, Hernán was part of the first European expedition towards the inner highlands of the Colombian Andes. On April 6, 1536, triggered by the stories of the mythical "City of Gold" El Dorado, Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada organised two groups of conquistadors towards the inner highlands of the Colombian Andes, as first European explorers.

Departments of Colombia

DepartmentdepartmentsColombian department
The harsh journey, taking almost a year and many deaths, led through the departments Magdalena, Cesar, Santander, Boyacá, Cundinamarca and Huila of present-day Colombia between 1536 and 1539 and, without him, Meta, Caquetá and Putumayo of Colombia and northern Peru and Ecuador between 1540 and 1542.

Magdalena Department

MagdalenaDepartment of MagdalenaMagdalena, Colombia
The harsh journey, taking almost a year and many deaths, led through the departments Magdalena, Cesar, Santander, Boyacá, Cundinamarca and Huila of present-day Colombia between 1536 and 1539 and, without him, Meta, Caquetá and Putumayo of Colombia and northern Peru and Ecuador between 1540 and 1542.

Cesar Department

CesarDepartment of Cesar Cesar
The harsh journey, taking almost a year and many deaths, led through the departments Magdalena, Cesar, Santander, Boyacá, Cundinamarca and Huila of present-day Colombia between 1536 and 1539 and, without him, Meta, Caquetá and Putumayo of Colombia and northern Peru and Ecuador between 1540 and 1542.

Santander Department

SantanderDepartment of SantanderSantander, Colombia
The harsh journey, taking almost a year and many deaths, led through the departments Magdalena, Cesar, Santander, Boyacá, Cundinamarca and Huila of present-day Colombia between 1536 and 1539 and, without him, Meta, Caquetá and Putumayo of Colombia and northern Peru and Ecuador between 1540 and 1542.

Boyacá Department

BoyacáBoyacaBoyaca Department
The harsh journey, taking almost a year and many deaths, led through the departments Magdalena, Cesar, Santander, Boyacá, Cundinamarca and Huila of present-day Colombia between 1536 and 1539 and, without him, Meta, Caquetá and Putumayo of Colombia and northern Peru and Ecuador between 1540 and 1542.