Herophilos

Herophilus of ChalcedonHerophilusHerophilean
Herophilos (335–280 BC), sometimes Latinised Herophilus, was a Greek physician deemed to be the first anatomist.wikipedia
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Erasistratus

Erasistratus of ChiosErasistrateanErasistrateans
Erasistratus was his contemporary.
Along with fellow physician Herophilus, he founded a school of anatomy in Alexandria, where they carried out anatomical research.

Aulus Cornelius Celsus

CelsusCornelius CelsusA.Cornelius Celsus
Celsus in the 1st-century medical treatise De Medicina and the early Christian author Tertullian state that Herophilos vivisected at least 600 live prisoners.
Celsus discusses, for example, the case of Herophilos and Erasistratos, who he asserts practised vivisection.

Anatomy

anatomistanatomicalanatomically
Herophilos (335–280 BC), sometimes Latinised Herophilus, was a Greek physician deemed to be the first anatomist.
Two of the most famous anatomists and physiologists of the third century were Herophilus and Erasistratus.

Vivisection

anti-vivisectionvivisectvivisected
In Alexandria, he practiced dissections, often publicly so that he could explain what he was doing to those who were fascinated.
It is possible that human vivisection was practiced by some Greek anatomists in Alexandria in the 3rd century BC. Celsus in De Medicina and the early-Christian writer Tertullian state that Herophilos of Alexandria vivisected at least 600 live prisoners.

Chalcedon

bishop of ChalcedonTitular Bishop of ChalcedonWestern Anatolia
Born in Chalcedon, he spent the majority of his life in Alexandria. Herophilos was born in Chalcedon in Asia Minor (now Kadiköy, Turkey), c. 335 BC. Not much is known about his early life other than he moved to Alexandria at a fairly young age to begin his schooling.
Herophilos (2nd century BC), Greek physician

Galen

Galenic medicineClaudius GalenusGalen of Pergamon
His works are lost but were much quoted by Galen in the second century AD. Herophilos was the first scientist to systematically perform scientific dissections of human cadavers.
For some of the ancient sources, such as Herophilus, Galen's account of their work is all that survives.

Duodenum

duodenaldodecadactylumduodenal cap
He also named the duodenum, which is part of the small intestine.
The intestinal section was so called by Greek physician Herophilus (c.335–280 B.C.E.) for its length, about equal to the breadth of 12 fingers.

Vein

veinsvenousvenous system
Veins were believed to be filled with blood and a mixture of air and water.
The Greek physician, Herophilus, distinguished veins from arteries but thought that the pulse was a property of arteries themselves.

Timeline of medicine and medical technology

medical author in antiquity
Timeline of medicine and medical technology
280 BC – Herophilus Dissection studies the nervous system and distinguishes between sensory nerves and motor nerves and the brain. also the anatomy of the eye and medical terminology such as (in Latin translation "net like" becomes retiform/retina.

Nerve

nervesinnervationinnervated
He looked more in depth into the network of nerves located in the cranium.
Herophilos 335–280 BCE, described the optic nerve and the oculomotor nerve for sight and eye movement.

Cerebellum

cerebellarcerebellar cortexcerebellar nuclei
He was the first person to differentiate between the cerebrum and the cerebellum, and to place individual importance on each portion.
Aristotle and Herophilus (quoted in Galen) called it the παρεγκεφαλίς (paregkephalis), as opposed to the ἐγκέφαλος (egkephalos) or brain proper.

Confluence of sinuses

confluence of the sinusestorcular herophili
A confluence of sinuses in the skull was originally named torcular Herophili after him.
An older term often used for the confluence of sinuses "torcular herophili", describes the veins as a gutter, or canal, and honors Herophilos, the Greek anatomist who was the first to use cadavers for the systematic study of anatomy.

Pancreas

pancreaticexocrine pancreashead of the pancreas
Other areas of his anatomical study include the liver, the pancreas, and the alimentary tract, as well as the salivary glands and genitalia.
The pancreas was first identified by Herophilus (335–280 BC), a Greek anatomist and surgeon.

Alcmaeon of Croton

Alcmaeon
Alcmaeon of Croton
Calcidius' commentary on Plato's Timaeus praises Alcmaeon (as well as Callisthenes and Herophilus), about their work on the nature of the eye.

Latin

Lat.Latin languagelat
Herophilos (335–280 BC), sometimes Latinised Herophilus, was a Greek physician deemed to be the first anatomist.

Greece

Greek🇬🇷Greeks
Herophilos (335–280 BC), sometimes Latinised Herophilus, was a Greek physician deemed to be the first anatomist.

Alexandria

Alexandria, EgyptAlexandrianAl-Iskandariyya
Born in Chalcedon, he spent the majority of his life in Alexandria.

De Medicina

Celsus in the 1st-century medical treatise De Medicina and the early Christian author Tertullian state that Herophilos vivisected at least 600 live prisoners.

Early Christianity

early Christianearly churchearly Christians
Celsus in the 1st-century medical treatise De Medicina and the early Christian author Tertullian state that Herophilos vivisected at least 600 live prisoners.

Anatolia

Asia MinorAsiaAnatolian
Herophilos was born in Chalcedon in Asia Minor (now Kadiköy, Turkey), c. 335 BC. Not much is known about his early life other than he moved to Alexandria at a fairly young age to begin his schooling.

Kadıköy

ChalcedonErenköyKadıköy, Istanbul
Herophilos was born in Chalcedon in Asia Minor (now Kadiköy, Turkey), c. 335 BC. Not much is known about his early life other than he moved to Alexandria at a fairly young age to begin his schooling.

Blood

human bloodhematologicalblood-forming
As an adult Herophilos was a teacher, and an author of at least nine texts ranging from his book titled, On Pulses, which explored the flow of blood from the heart through the arteries, to his book titled Midwifery, which discussed duration and phases of childbirth.

Heart

cardiachuman heartapex of the heart
As an adult Herophilos was a teacher, and an author of at least nine texts ranging from his book titled, On Pulses, which explored the flow of blood from the heart through the arteries, to his book titled Midwifery, which discussed duration and phases of childbirth.

Artery

arteriesarterialarterial system
As an adult Herophilos was a teacher, and an author of at least nine texts ranging from his book titled, On Pulses, which explored the flow of blood from the heart through the arteries, to his book titled Midwifery, which discussed duration and phases of childbirth.

Childbirth

laborbirthlabour
As an adult Herophilos was a teacher, and an author of at least nine texts ranging from his book titled, On Pulses, which explored the flow of blood from the heart through the arteries, to his book titled Midwifery, which discussed duration and phases of childbirth.