Herrenhausen Gardens

HerrenhausenHerrenhäuser Gärten, HanoverBerggartengardens at HerrenhausenGrosser GartenGroßer GartenHerrenhausen PalaceOrangerie HerrenhausenRoyal Gardens of HerrenhausenWelfenschloss
The Herrenhausen Gardens (Herrenhäuser Gärten, ) of Herrenhausen Palace, located in Herrenhausen, an urban district of Lower Saxony's capital of Hanover are made up of the Great Garden (Großer Garten), the Berggarten, the Georgengarten and the Welfengarten.wikipedia
85 Related Articles

Herrenhausen Palace

HerrenhausenSchloss Herrenhausen
The Herrenhausen Gardens (Herrenhäuser Gärten, ) of Herrenhausen Palace, located in Herrenhausen, an urban district of Lower Saxony's capital of Hanover are made up of the Great Garden (Großer Garten), the Berggarten, the Georgengarten and the Welfengarten. The gardens are a heritage of the Kings of Hanover.
It is the centerpiece of famous Herrenhausen Gardens.

Georgengarten

Herrenhausen Gardens
The Herrenhausen Gardens (Herrenhäuser Gärten, ) of Herrenhausen Palace, located in Herrenhausen, an urban district of Lower Saxony's capital of Hanover are made up of the Great Garden (Großer Garten), the Berggarten, the Georgengarten and the Welfengarten. The gardens are a heritage of the Kings of Hanover.
It is a part of Herrenhausen Gardens.

George II of Great Britain

George IIKing George IIPrince of Wales
The next king, George II, planned again for a new palace in better proportion with the Great Garden, but never realized it. His successor George III, who never visited Herrenhausen, had the palace modernized in neoclassical style by G. F. Laves.
On 22 August / 2 September 1705 Caroline arrived in Hanover for her wedding, which was held the same evening in the chapel at Herrenhausen.

Hanover

HannoverHanover, GermanyHannover, Germany
The Herrenhausen Gardens (Herrenhäuser Gärten, ) of Herrenhausen Palace, located in Herrenhausen, an urban district of Lower Saxony's capital of Hanover are made up of the Great Garden (Großer Garten), the Berggarten, the Georgengarten and the Welfengarten. The gardens are a heritage of the Kings of Hanover.
One of Hanover's most famous sights is the Royal Gardens of Herrenhausen.

Sophia of Hanover

Sophia, Electress of HanoverSophiaElectress Sophia
The Great Garden owes much of its aesthetics to Sophia of Hanover, consort of the Elector of Hanover and herself heiress to the British throne, who in 1683 commissioned the French gardener Martin Charbonnier to enlarge an existing garden. Much of the garden had to be rebuilt bit by bit after British air raids destroyed much of the city in World War II. In 1952, the Garden Library - which now houses the garden's management - was built, and in 1957, further members of the Royal Family of Hanover, including King George I of Great Britain and his parents, were interred in the garden's mausoleum, after destruction of the Leineschloss and its chapel during World War II. Among them are the remains of John Frederick, Duke of Brunswick-Luneburg, his daughter Anna Sophie (1670–1672), Ernest Augustus, Elector of Brunswick-Luneburg and his wife Sophia of the Palatinate, their younger son Ernest Augustus, Duke of York and Albany and Princess Charlotte of Clarence (1819–1819), daughter of William IV of the United Kingdom.
A patron of the arts, Sophia commissioned the palace and gardens of Herrenhausen and sponsored philosophers, such as Gottfried Leibniz and John Toland.

Herrenhausen

StöckenHannover-HerrenhausenHerrenhausen Palace
The Herrenhausen Gardens (Herrenhäuser Gärten, ) of Herrenhausen Palace, located in Herrenhausen, an urban district of Lower Saxony's capital of Hanover are made up of the Great Garden (Großer Garten), the Berggarten, the Georgengarten and the Welfengarten. The gardens are a heritage of the Kings of Hanover.
A major attraction is the baroque Herrenhausen Palace and Herrenhausen Gardens, established by the House of Hanover.

Orangery

orangerieorangerieslimonaia
Similarly, the building that houses the garden's orangery is utilized for both art exhibits and performances of classical music; matinee performances are presented in the foyer.
Hanover, a part of the Herrenhausen Gardens

House of Hanover

HanoverianHanoverHanoverians
It suffered immense damage during World War II (the Royal Air Force were requested by the British Royal Family not to attack the palace, at the time still owned by the House of Hanover, but in fact it was hit by bombs during an air raid in 1943).
His Herrenhausen Palace in Hanover had been completely destroyed during World War II. His eldest son, Prince Ernest Augustus, sold his remaining property at Herrenhausen Gardens in 1961, but kept the nearby Princely House, a small palace built in 1720 by George I for his daughter Anna Louise.

Georg Ludwig Friedrich Laves

LavesG. F. LavesGeorg Laves
The next king, George II, planned again for a new palace in better proportion with the Great Garden, but never realized it. His successor George III, who never visited Herrenhausen, had the palace modernized in neoclassical style by G. F. Laves.
The Palmenhaus ("Palm-house"), a conservatory in the Berggarten built between 1846 and 1849 (destroyed in World War II). The building housed the most extensive and valuable collection of palms in Europe.

Niki de Saint Phalle

Niki de Saint-PhalleartistCountess André-Marie de Saint-Phalle
The Great Garden is also the site of one of the last works of the artist Niki de Saint Phalle.
The permanent installation, in the Grosser Garten, Herrenhausen Gardens, Hannover, consisted of three rooms which were decorated on every surface with mirrors, glass, ceramics, and colored stones.

George I of Great Britain

George IKing George IKing George
Whereas Sophia's husband, Ernest Augustus, Elector of Brunswick-Luneburg, planned its replacement with a large baroque palace, and began constructions with the nearby grand Gallery Building, their son, elector George Louis, who in 1714 succeeded to the British throne as King George I, gave the palace project up and concentrated on water features. Much of the garden had to be rebuilt bit by bit after British air raids destroyed much of the city in World War II. In 1952, the Garden Library - which now houses the garden's management - was built, and in 1957, further members of the Royal Family of Hanover, including King George I of Great Britain and his parents, were interred in the garden's mausoleum, after destruction of the Leineschloss and its chapel during World War II. Among them are the remains of John Frederick, Duke of Brunswick-Luneburg, his daughter Anna Sophie (1670–1672), Ernest Augustus, Elector of Brunswick-Luneburg and his wife Sophia of the Palatinate, their younger son Ernest Augustus, Duke of York and Albany and Princess Charlotte of Clarence (1819–1819), daughter of William IV of the United Kingdom.
George's mother, the Electress Sophia, died on 28 May 1714 at the age of 83. She had collapsed in the gardens at Herrenhausen after rushing to shelter from a shower of rain.

John Frederick, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg

John FrederickJohann FriedrichJohn Frederick, Duke of Calenburg
Much of the garden had to be rebuilt bit by bit after British air raids destroyed much of the city in World War II. In 1952, the Garden Library - which now houses the garden's management - was built, and in 1957, further members of the Royal Family of Hanover, including King George I of Great Britain and his parents, were interred in the garden's mausoleum, after destruction of the Leineschloss and its chapel during World War II. Among them are the remains of John Frederick, Duke of Brunswick-Luneburg, his daughter Anna Sophie (1670–1672), Ernest Augustus, Elector of Brunswick-Luneburg and his wife Sophia of the Palatinate, their younger son Ernest Augustus, Duke of York and Albany and Princess Charlotte of Clarence (1819–1819), daughter of William IV of the United Kingdom.
In 1666, he had a palace built in Herrenhausen near Hanover that was inspired by the Palace of Versailles and is famous for its gardens, the Herrenhausen Gardens.

Ernest Augustus, Duke of Brunswick

Ernest AugustusErnest Augustus, Prince of Hanover and Duke of BrunswickErnst August
In front of the mausoleum are the graves of Ernest Augustus, Duke of Brunswick and his wife Princess Viktoria Luise of Prussia.
He was interred, later to be joined by the remains of his wife, in front of the Royal Mausoleum in the Berggarten at Herrenhausen Gardens in Hanover, which is the burial chapel of King Ernest Augustus of Hanover and his wife.

Prince Ernst August of Hanover (born 1983)

Prince Ernst August of HanoverPrince Ernst AugustHereditary Prince Ernst August
His grandson Prince Ernst August of Hanover uses it as his private residence today.
Since the sale of his nearby Calenberg manor house in 2010, the young prince resides at the Fürstenhaus ("Princely House") at Herrenhausen Gardens in Hanover when in Germany.

Prince Ernest Augustus of Hanover (1914–1987)

Prince Ernest Augustus of HanoverErnest Augustus, Prince of HanoverPrince Ernest Augustus
Although the University has occupied the castle since 1879, it was not until 1961 that Prince Ernest Augustus of Hanover sold the Welfengarten to the city of Hanover.
In 1961 he sold his remaining properties at Herrenhausen Gardens, including the site of Herrenhausen Palace which had been destroyed by a British bombing raid in 1943.

Princess Victoria Louise of Prussia

Victoria Louise of PrussiaPrincess Viktoria LuisePrincess Victoria Louise
In front of the mausoleum are the graves of Ernest Augustus, Duke of Brunswick and his wife Princess Viktoria Luise of Prussia.
She is buried next to her husband in front of the Royal Mausoleum in the Berggarten at Herrenhausen Gardens in Hanover, which is the burial chapel of Ernest Augustus, King of Hanover, and his wife.

Ernest Augustus, King of Hanover

Ernest AugustusDuke of CumberlandErnest Augustus, Duke of Cumberland
Work on the garden's mausoleum, also designed by Laves, lasted from 1842 to 1847; King Ernest Augustus, who died one year after completion, was interred there with his wife Queen Frederica.
Both he and Queen Frederica rest in a mausoleum in the Berggarten of Herrenhausen Gardens.

Fountain

fountainsdrinking fountainwater fountains
Taking the form of a roughly 30 meter tall palace-like structure, the greenhouse - built out of glass and steel - houses both galleries and decorative fountains and replaced the previous Palmenhaus.
The Great Fountain in Herrenhausen Gardens at Hanover was based on ideas of Gottfried Leibniz conceived in 1694 and was inaugurated in 1719 during the visit of George I.

Lower Saxony

Lower SaxonNiedersachsenSaxon
The Herrenhausen Gardens (Herrenhäuser Gärten, ) of Herrenhausen Palace, located in Herrenhausen, an urban district of Lower Saxony's capital of Hanover are made up of the Great Garden (Großer Garten), the Berggarten, the Georgengarten and the Welfengarten. The gardens are a heritage of the Kings of Hanover.

Kingdom of Hanover

HanoverHanoverianHannover
The Herrenhausen Gardens (Herrenhäuser Gärten, ) of Herrenhausen Palace, located in Herrenhausen, an urban district of Lower Saxony's capital of Hanover are made up of the Great Garden (Großer Garten), the Berggarten, the Georgengarten and the Welfengarten. The gardens are a heritage of the Kings of Hanover.

English landscape garden

landscape gardenlandscape parkEnglish style
Both the Georgengarten and the Welfengarten have been made in the style of English gardens, and both are considered popular recreation areas for the residents of Hanover.

Aesthetics

aestheticart theoryphilosophy of art
The Great Garden owes much of its aesthetics to Sophia of Hanover, consort of the Elector of Hanover and herself heiress to the British throne, who in 1683 commissioned the French gardener Martin Charbonnier to enlarge an existing garden.

Leineschloss

Leine PalaceLeine Castleresidential palace
Much of the garden had to be rebuilt bit by bit after British air raids destroyed much of the city in World War II. In 1952, the Garden Library - which now houses the garden's management - was built, and in 1957, further members of the Royal Family of Hanover, including King George I of Great Britain and his parents, were interred in the garden's mausoleum, after destruction of the Leineschloss and its chapel during World War II. Among them are the remains of John Frederick, Duke of Brunswick-Luneburg, his daughter Anna Sophie (1670–1672), Ernest Augustus, Elector of Brunswick-Luneburg and his wife Sophia of the Palatinate, their younger son Ernest Augustus, Duke of York and Albany and Princess Charlotte of Clarence (1819–1819), daughter of William IV of the United Kingdom. It served as a summer retreat, located only a few kilometers outside the city, while the Leineschloss was the main residence in town.

Ernest Augustus, Elector of Brunswick-Lüneburg

Ernest AugustusErnest Augustus of Brunswick-LüneburgErnst August
Whereas Sophia's husband, Ernest Augustus, Elector of Brunswick-Luneburg, planned its replacement with a large baroque palace, and began constructions with the nearby grand Gallery Building, their son, elector George Louis, who in 1714 succeeded to the British throne as King George I, gave the palace project up and concentrated on water features. Much of the garden had to be rebuilt bit by bit after British air raids destroyed much of the city in World War II. In 1952, the Garden Library - which now houses the garden's management - was built, and in 1957, further members of the Royal Family of Hanover, including King George I of Great Britain and his parents, were interred in the garden's mausoleum, after destruction of the Leineschloss and its chapel during World War II. Among them are the remains of John Frederick, Duke of Brunswick-Luneburg, his daughter Anna Sophie (1670–1672), Ernest Augustus, Elector of Brunswick-Luneburg and his wife Sophia of the Palatinate, their younger son Ernest Augustus, Duke of York and Albany and Princess Charlotte of Clarence (1819–1819), daughter of William IV of the United Kingdom.