Herrenhausen Palace

HerrenhausenSchloss Herrenhausen
Herrenhausen Palace (German: Schloss Herrenhausen) is a former royal summer residence of the House of Hanover in the Herrenhausen district of the German city of Hanover.wikipedia
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Herrenhausen Gardens

HerrenhausenHerrenhäuser Gärten, HanoverBerggarten
It is the centerpiece of famous Herrenhausen Gardens. Prince Ernest Augustus of Hanover sold his remaining property at Herrenhausen Gardens in 1961, but kept the nearby Princely House, a small palace built in 1720 by George I for his daughter Anna Louise.
The Herrenhausen Gardens (Herrenhäuser Gärten, ) of Herrenhausen Palace, located in Herrenhausen, an urban district of Lower Saxony's capital of Hanover are made up of the Great Garden (Großer Garten), the Berggarten, the Georgengarten and the Welfengarten. The gardens are a heritage of the Kings of Hanover.

House of Hanover

HanoverianHanoverHanoverians
Herrenhausen Palace (German: Schloss Herrenhausen) is a former royal summer residence of the House of Hanover in the Herrenhausen district of the German city of Hanover.
His Herrenhausen Palace in Hanover had been completely destroyed during World War II. His eldest son, Prince Ernest Augustus, sold his remaining property at Herrenhausen Gardens in 1961, but kept the nearby Princely House, a small palace built in 1720 by George I for his daughter Anna Louise.

Herrenhausen

StöckenHannover-HerrenhausenHerrenhausen Palace
Herrenhausen Palace (German: Schloss Herrenhausen) is a former royal summer residence of the House of Hanover in the Herrenhausen district of the German city of Hanover.
A major attraction is the baroque Herrenhausen Palace and Herrenhausen Gardens, established by the House of Hanover.

Leineschloss

Leine PalaceLeine Castleresidential palace
Originally a manor house of 1640, it was enlarged in phases from 1676, and served as a summer retreat, located only a few kilometers outside the city from the central Leineschloss.
King George I of Great Britain was originally buried in the Chapel of the Leineschloss, but his remains, along with his parents', were moved to the 19th-century mausoleum of King Ernest Augustus in the Berggarten of Herrenhausen Palace after World War II.

Prince Ernest Augustus of Hanover (1914–1987)

Prince Ernest Augustus of HanoverErnest Augustus, Prince of HanoverPrince Ernest Augustus
Prince Ernest Augustus of Hanover sold his remaining property at Herrenhausen Gardens in 1961, but kept the nearby Princely House, a small palace built in 1720 by George I for his daughter Anna Louise.
In 1961 he sold his remaining properties at Herrenhausen Gardens, including the site of Herrenhausen Palace which had been destroyed by a British bombing raid in 1943.

Georg Ludwig Friedrich Laves

LavesG. F. LavesGeorg Laves
The next king, George II, planned again for a new palace in better proportion with the "Grosser Garten", but never realized it. His successor George III, who never visited Herrenhausen, had the palace modernised in neoclassical style by Georg Ludwig Friedrich Laves.
The facade of Herrenhausen Palace (Schloss Herrenhausen) in neoclassical style, about 1820/21 (destroyed in World War II and rebuilt in 2013).

Princess Amelia of Great Britain

Princess AmeliaAmelia Amelia
Princess Amelia of Great Britain
Princess Amelia was born at Herrenhausen Palace, Hanover, Germany, on 30 May 1711 (Old Style).

Marienburg Castle (Hanover)

Marienburg CastleSchloss MarienburgMarienburg
It is now his grandson Ernest Augustus's private home, along with Marienburg Castle.
Between 1714 and 1837 there had been virtually no royal court in Hannover as the House of Hannover had ruled the kingdoms of Hannover and Britain by personal union, and so the Castle was also built to serve as a suitable summer seat for the House of Hannover in Germany, besides the Royal Leine Palace and Herrenhausen Palace in Hannover.

Anne, Princess Royal and Princess of Orange

AnneAnne, Princess RoyalAnne, Princess of Orange
Anne, Princess Royal and Princess of Orange
Anne was born at Herrenhausen Palace, Hanover, five years before her paternal grandfather, Elector George Louis, succeeded to the thrones of Great Britain and Ireland as George I.

Princess Caroline of Great Britain

CarolinePrincess CarolineCaroline Elizabeth
Princess Caroline of Great Britain
Princess Caroline was born at Herrenhausen Palace in Hanover, Germany, on 10 June 1713 (New Style Gregorian calendar).

Princess Eugenie of York

Princess EugenieEugenieEugenie of York
The palace was reopened on 18 January 2013 in a ceremony attended by Their Royal Highnesses, Princess Beatrice of York and Princess Eugenie of York, as well as by Prince Ernst August of Hanover.
These included representing the Queen at the reopening of the former Hanoverian royal palace, the Schloss Herrenhausen, which was bombed by the Royal Air Force during the Second World War.

List of castles and palaces in Lower Saxony

Buckeburg CastleCastles in Lower Saxony
List of castles and palaces in Lower Saxony
Herrenhausen Castle, Hanover

George I of Great Britain

George IKing George IKing George
Sophia's husband, Ernest Augustus, Elector of Brunswick-Lüneburg, planned its replacement with a large baroque palace, and began construction with the "Galerie", but their son, elector George Louis, who in 1714 succeeded to the British throne as King George I, gave up the palace building project and concentrated on adding water features to the garden.

Germany

🇩🇪GermanGER
Herrenhausen Palace (German: Schloss Herrenhausen) is a former royal summer residence of the House of Hanover in the Herrenhausen district of the German city of Hanover.

Hanover

HannoverHanover, GermanyHannover, Germany
Herrenhausen Palace (German: Schloss Herrenhausen) is a former royal summer residence of the House of Hanover in the Herrenhausen district of the German city of Hanover.

Sophia of Hanover

Sophia, Electress of HanoverSophiaElectress Sophia
In 1683 Sophia of Hanover commissioned the French gardener Martin Charbonnier to enlarge the garden in the manner of Versailles to form the 50 hectare "Grosser Garten".

Ernest Augustus, Elector of Brunswick-Lüneburg

Ernest AugustusErnest Augustus of Brunswick-LüneburgErnst August
Sophia's husband, Ernest Augustus, Elector of Brunswick-Lüneburg, planned its replacement with a large baroque palace, and began construction with the "Galerie", but their son, elector George Louis, who in 1714 succeeded to the British throne as King George I, gave up the palace building project and concentrated on adding water features to the garden.

Water feature

water featuresartificial waterfallcascade
Sophia's husband, Ernest Augustus, Elector of Brunswick-Lüneburg, planned its replacement with a large baroque palace, and began construction with the "Galerie", but their son, elector George Louis, who in 1714 succeeded to the British throne as King George I, gave up the palace building project and concentrated on adding water features to the garden.

George III of the United Kingdom

George IIIKing George IIIKing George
The next king, George II, planned again for a new palace in better proportion with the "Grosser Garten", but never realized it. His successor George III, who never visited Herrenhausen, had the palace modernised in neoclassical style by Georg Ludwig Friedrich Laves.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
During World War II Herrenhausen Palace suffered immense damage in a British bombing raid on 18 October 1943.

Bombing of Hanover in World War II

British aerial bombingsa 1943 air-raid on the cityair raid in July 1943
During World War II Herrenhausen Palace suffered immense damage in a British bombing raid on 18 October 1943.

Prince Ernst August of Hanover (born 1983)

Prince Ernst August of HanoverPrince Ernst AugustHereditary Prince Ernst August
It is now his grandson Ernest Augustus's private home, along with Marienburg Castle. The palace was reopened on 18 January 2013 in a ceremony attended by Their Royal Highnesses, Princess Beatrice of York and Princess Eugenie of York, as well as by Prince Ernst August of Hanover.

Volkswagen Foundation

Volkswagen
The Volkswagen Foundation received the plot and sponsored the reconstruction.

Princess Beatrice of York

Princess BeatriceBeatriceHRH Princess Beatrice
The palace was reopened on 18 January 2013 in a ceremony attended by Their Royal Highnesses, Princess Beatrice of York and Princess Eugenie of York, as well as by Prince Ernst August of Hanover.

Garden design

formal gardensrock gardengarden
The palace's extensive gardens extending beyond the original "Grossen Garten" are an important example of baroque and later garden design and contain many significant period garden buildings.