Hezekiah

King HezekiahEzekiasEzechiasHezekiah of JudahHezekiah's revoltKing Hezekiah of JudahKing Hizkiyahu of Judah
Hezekiah was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the son of Ahaz and the 13th king of Judah.wikipedia
317 Related Articles

Kingdom of Judah

Judahking of JudahJudahite
Hezekiah was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the son of Ahaz and the 13th king of Judah.
In the 7th century its population increased greatly, prospering under Assyrian vassalage (despite Hezekiah's revolt against the Assyrian king Sennacherib ), but in 605 the Assyrian Empire was defeated, and the ensuing competition between the Twenty-sixth Dynasty of Egypt and the Neo-Babylonian Empire for control of the Eastern Mediterranean led to the destruction of the kingdom in a series of campaigns between 597 and 582, the deportation of the elite of the community, and the incorporation of Judah into a province of the Neo-Babylonian Empire.

Genealogy of Jesus

genealogies of Jesusgenealogyancestors of Jesus
He is also one of the most prominent kings of Judah mentioned in the Bible and is one of the kings mentioned in the genealogy of Jesus in the Gospel of Matthew.

Isaiah

Book of IsaiahProphet IsaiahIsaias
Isaiah and Micah prophesied during his reign.
The first verse of the Book of Isaiah states that Isaiah prophesied during the reigns of Uzziah (or Azariah), Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, the kings of Judah . Uzziah's reign was 52 years in the middle of the 8th century BCE, and Isaiah must have begun his ministry a few years before Uzziah's death, probably in the 740s BCE.

Manasseh of Judah

ManassehKing ManassehManasseh of Juda
He died from natural causes at the age of 54 in c. 687 BC, and was succeeded by his son Manasseh.
He was the oldest of at least two sons of Hezekiah and his wife Hephzibah . He became king at the age of 12 and reigned for 55 years.

Nehushtan

bronze serpentBrazen SerpentThe Brazen Serpent
In an effort to abolish idolatry from his kingdom, he destroyed the high places (or bamot) and the "bronze serpent" (or Nehushtan), recorded as being made by Moses, which became objects of idolatrous worship.
In Kings, King Hezekiah institutes an iconoclastic reform that requires the destruction of "the brazen serpent that Moses had made; for unto those days the children of Israel did burn incense to it; and it was called Nehushtan".

Micah (prophet)

MicahMicah of MoresethMicah the Morashtite
Isaiah and Micah prophesied during his reign.
He prophesied during the reigns of kings Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah of Judah.

Sennacherib

conquerKing SennacheribSennacherib against Hezekiah
According to the Bible, Hezekiah witnessed the destruction of the northern Kingdom of Israel by Sargon's Assyrians in c. 722 BC and was king of Judah during the siege of Jerusalem by Sennacherib in 701 BC.
In 701 BCE, Sennacherib turned from Babylonia to the western part of the empire, where Hezekiah of Judah, incited by Egypt and Marduk-apla-iddina, had renounced Assyrian allegiance.

Yahweh

GodYahGod of Israel
Hezekiah enacted sweeping religious reforms, including a strict mandate for the sole worship of Yahweh and a prohibition on venerating other deities within the Temple of Jerusalem.
No satisfactory explanation of Israelite aniconism has been advanced, and a number of recent scholars have argued that Yahweh was in fact represented prior to the reforms of Hezekiah and Josiah late in the monarchic period: to quote one recent study, "[a]n early aniconism, de facto or otherwise, is purely a projection of the post-exilic imagination" (MacDonald, 2007).

High place

bamotaltarsbamah
In an effort to abolish idolatry from his kingdom, he destroyed the high places (or bamot) and the "bronze serpent" (or Nehushtan), recorded as being made by Moses, which became objects of idolatrous worship.
The building of YHWH's singular Temple at Jerusalem, which (under the Law of Moses) had an exclusive right to offer sacrifices, did not stop the bamot sacrifices until Kings Hezekiah and Josiah proscribed them.

Abijah (queen)

AbiAbijah
Hezekiah was the son of King Ahaz and Abijah.
She was the daughter of a Zechariah, possibly Zechariah the son of Jeberechiah (2 Chronicles 29:1; compare Isaiah 8:2), and afterwards the wife of King Ahaz and mother of King Hezekiah.

Siloam tunnel

533-meter tunnelone of whichThe Siloam tunnel
He made at least two major preparations that would help Jerusalem to resist conquest: the construction of the Siloam Tunnel, and construction of the Broad Wall. The Siloam Tunnel was chiseled through 533 meters (1,750 feet) of solid rock in order to provide Jerusalem underground access to the waters of the Gihon Spring or Siloam Pool, which lay outside the city.
Its popular name is due to the most common hypothesis that it dates from the reign of Hezekiah of Judah (late 8th and early 7th century BC) and corresponds to the "water works" mentioned in in the Hebrew Bible.

Ten Lost Tribes

lost tribes of IsraelLost TribesTen Tribes
Hezekiah also defeated the Philistines, "as far as Gaza and its territory", and resumed the Passover pilgrimage and the tradition of inviting the scattered tribes of Israel to take part in a Passover festival.
Many also fled south to Jerusalem, which appears to have expanded in size fivefold during this period, requiring a new wall to be built, and a new source of water (Siloam) to be provided by King Hezekiah.

Ahaz

King AhazAchazAhaz of Judah
Hezekiah was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the son of Ahaz and the 13th king of Judah. Hezekiah was the son of King Ahaz and Abijah.
He died at the age of 36 and was succeeded by his son, Hezekiah.

Solomon

King SolomonSalomonSolomonic magic
Nevertheless, the Passover was celebrated with great solemnity and such rejoicing as had not been in Jerusalem since the days of Solomon.
In the branch of literary analysis that examines the Bible, called higher criticism, the story of Solomon falling into idolatry by the influence of Pharaoh's daughter and his other foreign wives is "customarily seen as the handiwork of the 'deuteronomistic historian(s)'", who are held to have written, compiled, or edited texts to legitimize the reforms of Hezekiah's grandson, King Josiah who reigned from ca 641 BCE to 609 BCE (over 280 years after Solomon's death according to Bible scholars).

Edwin R. Thiele

E. R. ThieleEdwin ThieleThiele
Edwin Thiele concluded that his reign was between c. 715 and 686 BC. He is considered a very righteous king by the author of the Books of Kings.
Thiele was able to reconcile the Biblical chronological data from the books of Kings and Chronicles with the exception of synchronisms between Hoshea of Israel and Hezekiah of Judah towards the end of the kingdom of Israel and reluctantly concluded that at that point the ancient authors had made a mistake.

Book of Micah

MicahMicah 4:9Micah 6:8
His reign is also referred to in the books of the prophets Isaiah, Jeremiah, Hosea, and Micah.
Chapter 1:1 identifies the prophet as "Micah of Moresheth" (a town in southern Judah), and states that he lived during the reigns of Yehotam, Ahaz and Hezekiah, roughly 750–700 BC.

Philistines

PhilistinePhilistiaPeleset
Hezekiah also defeated the Philistines, "as far as Gaza and its territory", and resumed the Passover pilgrimage and the tradition of inviting the scattered tribes of Israel to take part in a Passover festival.
Hezekiah defeats the Philistines as far as Gaza and its territory.

LMLK seal

LMLKlmlk HebronLMLK seals
A lintel inscription, found over the doorway of a tomb, has been ascribed to his secretary, Shebnah .LMLK stored jars along the border with Assyria "demonstrate careful preparations to counter Sennacherib's likely route of invasion" and show "a notable degree of royal control of towns and cities which would facilitate Hezekiah's destruction of rural sacrificial sites and his centralization of worship in Jerusalem".
LMLK seals are ancient Hebrew seals stamped on the handles of large storage jars dating from reign of King Hezekiah (circa 700 BC) discovered mostly in and around Jerusalem.

Broad Wall (Jerusalem)

Broad Wallcity wall
He made at least two major preparations that would help Jerusalem to resist conquest: the construction of the Siloam Tunnel, and construction of the Broad Wall.
The wall was unearthed in the 1970s by Israeli archaeologist Nahman Avigad and dated to the reign of King Hezekiah (late eighth century BCE).

Books of Kings

2 KingsKings1 Kings
Edwin Thiele concluded that his reign was between c. 715 and 686 BC. He is considered a very righteous king by the author of the Books of Kings.
Hezekiah, the 14th king of Judah, does "what [is] right in the Lord’s sight just as his ancestor David had done" and institutes a far reaching religious reform, centralising sacrifice at the temple at Jerusalem and destroying the images of other gods.

Assyrian siege of Jerusalem

Siege of JerusalemAssyrian conquest of SamariaAssyrian siege in 701 BCE
According to the Bible, Hezekiah witnessed the destruction of the northern Kingdom of Israel by Sargon's Assyrians in c. 722 BC and was king of Judah during the siege of Jerusalem by Sennacherib in 701 BC.

Solomon's Temple

TempleFirst TempleFirst
Hezekiah enacted sweeping religious reforms, including a strict mandate for the sole worship of Yahweh and a prohibition on venerating other deities within the Temple of Jerusalem.
Hezekiah

Pool of Siloam

pools of SiloahSiloamsoutheastern corner
The Siloam Tunnel was chiseled through 533 meters (1,750 feet) of solid rock in order to provide Jerusalem underground access to the waters of the Gihon Spring or Siloam Pool, which lay outside the city.
The Pool of Siloam was first built during the reign of Hezekiah (715–687/6 BCE), to provide a water supply inside the City to protect it from a siege.

Rabshakeh

Rab-shakeh
Sennacherib surrounded the city and sent his Rabshakeh to the walls as a messenger.
The Hebrew Bible mentions it for one of Sennacherib's messengers to Hezekiah, who were sent to Jerusalem along with the Tartan and the Rabsaris.

Tribe of Zebulun

Zebulunhouse of Zebulunof Zebulun
The messengers, however, were not only not listened to, but were even laughed at; only a few men of Asher, Manasseh, and Zebulun came to the city.
When Hezekiah made reparation for the abominations of his father Ahaz, he invited all Israel to keep the Passover in the house of the Lord.