Hia C-eḍ Oʼodham

Hia C-ed O'odhamHia C-eḍ O'odhamHia C-ed OʼodhamHia-Ced OʼodhamSand Papago
The Hia C-eḍ Oʼodham ("Sand Dune People"), also known as Areneños or Sand Papagos are a Native American peoples whose traditional homeland lies between the Ajo Range, the Gila River, the Colorado River, and the Gulf of California.wikipedia
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Tohono Oʼodham Nation

Tohono O'odham NationPapago Indian TribeTohono O'odham Nation of Arizona
They are currently unrecognized at both the state and federal level in the United States and Mexico, although the Tohono Oʼodham Nation has a committee for issues related to them and has land held in trust for them.
In 2009, The Nation acquired 650 acre of land near Why, Arizona with the intention of eventually creating a new district of the Tohono Oʼodham Nation for the Hia C-eḍ Oʼodham.

Ak-Chin Indian Community

Ak ChinAk-ChinAk Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona
Some Hia Ced Oʼodham people are enrolled in the Ak-Chin Indian Community.
The Community is composed mainly of Akimel Oʼodham and Tohono Oʼodham, as well as some ethnic Hia-Ced Oʼodham members.

Tohono Oʼodham

Tohono O'odhamPapagoO'odham
They have often been considered a "Papago subtribe" by anthropologists, along with the Tohono Oʼodham and several groups that vanished or merged with the Tohono Oʼodham.

Pholisma sonorae

sand foodsandfood
They also ate Pholisma sonorae, an edible flower stalk called camote and "sand food" found in the sand dunes, mesquite beans, saguaro fruit, and pitaya, which they gathered near Quitobaquito and the Lower Sonoita River.
This was an important food item for certain desert-dwelling Native American peoples, including the Cocopah and the Hia C-ed O'odham.

Indigenous peoples of the Americas

Native AmericanNative Americansindigenous
The Hia C-eḍ Oʼodham ("Sand Dune People"), also known as Areneños or Sand Papagos are a Native American peoples whose traditional homeland lies between the Ajo Range, the Gila River, the Colorado River, and the Gulf of California.

Gila River

GilaGila ValleyGila Basin
The Hia C-eḍ Oʼodham ("Sand Dune People"), also known as Areneños or Sand Papagos are a Native American peoples whose traditional homeland lies between the Ajo Range, the Gila River, the Colorado River, and the Gulf of California.

Colorado River

ColoradoColorado River BasinGrand River
The Hia C-eḍ Oʼodham ("Sand Dune People"), also known as Areneños or Sand Papagos are a Native American peoples whose traditional homeland lies between the Ajo Range, the Gila River, the Colorado River, and the Gulf of California.

Gulf of California

Sea of CortezSea of CortésCortezian
The Hia C-eḍ Oʼodham ("Sand Dune People"), also known as Areneños or Sand Papagos are a Native American peoples whose traditional homeland lies between the Ajo Range, the Gila River, the Colorado River, and the Gulf of California.

Ajo, Arizona

Ajo
The Hia C-eḍ Oʼodham are no longer nomadic, and the majority today live in or near Ajo, Arizona, or the small settlements of Blaisdell and Dome near Yuma.

Yuma, Arizona

YumaYuma, AZArizona City
The Hia C-eḍ Oʼodham are no longer nomadic, and the majority today live in or near Ajo, Arizona, or the small settlements of Blaisdell and Dome near Yuma.

Blood quantum laws

blood quantumblood-quantumfull-blood
Anybody who can prove Hia C-eḍ Oʼodham ancestry meeting Tohono Oʼodham Nation blood quantum can apply for membership in the Tohono Oʼodham Nation.

Why, Arizona

Why
On February 24, 2009, 642.27 acres of land near Why, Arizona, which were previously purchased by the Tohono Oʼodham Nation, were acquired in trust for the Nation.

Culture

culturalculturesculturally
Due to geographical proximity, certain cultural traits were borrowed from the Yuman peoples, with some sources implying that their culture was more Yuman than it was Piman, with the exception of their language.

Cocopah

CocopaCocopah peopleCucapá
According to historical sources, the Hia C-eḍ Oʼodham were friendly with the Cocopah, the Quechan, and the Halchidhoma.

Quechan

YumaYumanYuma Indians
According to historical sources, the Hia C-eḍ Oʼodham were friendly with the Cocopah, the Quechan, and the Halchidhoma.

Halchidhoma

AlebdomaHalchidhoma languageXalychidom
According to historical sources, the Hia C-eḍ Oʼodham were friendly with the Cocopah, the Quechan, and the Halchidhoma.

Hare

jackrabbitLepushares
They caught jackrabbits by chasing them down in the sand.

Mule deer

Odocoileus hemionusmuledeer
They hunted mountain sheep, mule deer, and pronghorn with bows and arrows.

Pronghorn

pronghorn antelopeAntilocapra americanaantelope
They hunted mountain sheep, mule deer, and pronghorn with bows and arrows.

Muskrat

OndatraOndatra zibethicusmuskrats
They caught muskrats and lizards as well.

Lizard

lizardsLacertiliaLacertilia indet.
They caught muskrats and lizards as well.

Saguaro

saguaro cactusCarnegiea giganteasaguaro cacti
They also ate Pholisma sonorae, an edible flower stalk called camote and "sand food" found in the sand dunes, mesquite beans, saguaro fruit, and pitaya, which they gathered near Quitobaquito and the Lower Sonoita River.

Pitaya

dragon fruitpitahayadragonfruit
They also ate Pholisma sonorae, an edible flower stalk called camote and "sand food" found in the sand dunes, mesquite beans, saguaro fruit, and pitaya, which they gathered near Quitobaquito and the Lower Sonoita River.