High rising terminal

rising intonationuptalkrising intonation at the endrise in pitchupward inflexionUp talkAustralian Questioning IntonationHigh Rise Terminalrising inflectionquestion intonation
The high rising terminal (HRT), also known as upspeak, uptalk, rising inflection, or high rising intonation (HRI), is a feature of some variants of English where declarative sentence clauses end with a rising-pitch intonation, until the end of the sentence where a falling-pitch is applied.wikipedia
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Intonation (linguistics)

intonationintonationalintonations
The high rising terminal (HRT), also known as upspeak, uptalk, rising inflection, or high rising intonation (HRI), is a feature of some variants of English where declarative sentence clauses end with a rising-pitch intonation, until the end of the sentence where a falling-pitch is applied.
example: group membership can be indicated by the use of intonation patterns adopted specifically by that group, such as street vendors or preachers. The so-called high rising terminal, where a statement ends with a high rising pitch movement, is said to be typical of younger speakers of English, and possibly to be more widely found among young female speakers.

Ulster English

BelfastUlsterNorthern Ireland
Although it is characterized in Britain as "Australian question intonation" (AQI) and blamed on the popularity of Australian soap operas among teenagers, HRT is also a feature of several Irish-English dialects, especially in mid-Ulster and Belfast English.
In general, Ulster English speakers' declarative sentences (with typical grammatical structure, i.e. non-topicalized statements) end with a rise in pitch, which is often heard by speakers of non-Ulster English as a question-like intonation pattern.

New Zealand English

New ZealandEnglishNew Zealand accent
With respect to the southern hemisphere, it has been suggested that the feature may have originated in New Zealand.
Some New Zealanders will often reply to a question with a statement spoken with a rising intonation at the end.

Valleyspeak

valspeakvalley girl accentaccent
It has been noted in speech heard in areas of Canada, in Cape Town, the Falkland Islands, and in the United States where it is often associated with a particular sociolect that originated among affluent teenage girls in Southern California (see Valleyspeak and Valley girl).
High rising terminal (also called "up speak" or "uptalk") is a defining feature of Valleyspeak. Statements have a rising intonation, causing declarative language to appear interrogative to listeners unfamiliar with the dialect. Research on uptalk has found a number of pragmatic uses, including confirming that the interlocutor follows what is being said and indicating that the speaker has more to say and so their conversation partner should not interrupt them (also called "floor holding"). The high rising terminal feature has been adopted by speakers beyond the traditional users of Valleyspeak, including men and New Zealanders.

Sexy baby voice

sexy baby
Sexy baby voice
Actress Lake Bell described the style as an amalgamation of "valley-girl voice" (characterized by "upspeak" and vocal fry) and high pitch.

After Extra Time (album)

After Extra Time
The piece is also the basis for another work, "HRT High Rise Terminal ", which was included by Relâche on their album, Pick It Up in 1997.

Hiberno-English

IrishIrelandIrish accent
An ordinarily grammatically structured (i.e. non-topicalised) declarative sentences, often, with a rising intonation at the end of the sentence (the type of intonation pattern that other English speakers usually associate with questions).

Language and gender

gender and languagegenderlectfeminizing
These include tag questions, question intonation, and "weak" directives, among others (see also Speech practices associated with gender, below).

Languages of New Zealand

official language of New Zealand3Other minority languages
New Zealanders often reply to a question or emphasise a point by adding a rising intonation at the end of the sentence.

Airhead (subculture)

airheadpopular cliquemany members of the subculture
With the rise of the valley girl and preppy subculture however, the term was applied to cheerleaders and nouveau riche or middle class hangers-on who imitated the uptalk speech and clothing of the upper class popular girls.

Fictional world of The Hunger Games

District 12Panemmockingjay
The letter s is a hiss and the tone rises at the end of every sentence, as if the speaker is asking a question.

Australia–United Kingdom relations

Anglo-Australian relations
Soap alumni such as Kylie Minogue and Jason Donovan have continued to have successful careers in music and on the stage in Britain, while Neighbours has even been held responsible for introducing the rising inflection to England.

Mock language

It also features uptalk, creaky voice, blondness and the stereotypical association with Starbucks.

Demographics of New Zealand

New Zealandethnic makeup of the populationthe population
New Zealanders often reply to a question or emphasise a point by adding a rising intonation at the end of the sentence.

Cardiff English

CardiffCardiff accent
Nevertheless, the average pitch is lower than other South Wales accents and RP. High rising terminal is also what characterises the dialect from RP, as well as consistency in intonation with strong expression; such as annoyance, excitement and emphasis.

Australian English phonology

Australian EnglishAustralianAuE
In English, upward inflexion (a rise in the pitch of the voice at the end of an utterance) typically signals a question. Some Australian English speakers commonly use a form of upward inflexion in their speech that is not associated with asking questions. Some speakers use upward inflexion as a way of including their conversational partner in the dialogue. This is also common in Californian English.

Penelope Eckert

Eckert, PenelopePenny EckertEckert
For example, tag questions and rising intonations are typically attributed to be common markers of 'women's language'.

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
The high rising terminal (HRT), also known as upspeak, uptalk, rising inflection, or high rising intonation (HRI), is a feature of some variants of English where declarative sentence clauses end with a rising-pitch intonation, until the end of the sentence where a falling-pitch is applied.