Himerius

Himerius (c. 315 AD – c. 386 AD) was a Greek sophist and rhetorician.wikipedia
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Sophist

sophistssophistrySophism
Himerius (c. 315 AD – c. 386 AD) was a Greek sophist and rhetorician.
For instance, Libanius, Himerius, Aelius Aristides, and Fronto were sophists in this sense.

Gregory of Nazianzus

Gregory NazianzenGregory NazianzusGregory the Theologian
Amongst his pupils were Gregory of Nazianzus and Basil the Great, bishop of Caesarea.
In Athens, Gregory studied under the famous rhetoricians Himerius and Proaeresius.

Eunapius

Eunapius of SardisEunapius Sardianus
The Lives of Philosophers and Sophists consists of the biographies of the following philosophers and sophists: Plotinus, Porphyry, Iamblichus, Alypius, Sosipatra, Aedesius the Cappadocian, Sopater, Ablabius, Eustathius, Maximus, Priscus, Julian of Cappadocia, Prohaeresius, Epiphanius, Diophantus (Diophantus the Arab), Sopolis, Himerius, Parnacius, Libanius, Acacius, Nymphidianus, Zeno of Cyprus, Magnus, Oribasius, Ionicus and Chrysanthius.

Greece

GreekHellenic RepublicGreeks
Himerius (c. 315 AD – c. 386 AD) was a Greek sophist and rhetorician.

Rhetoric

rhetoricianrhetorrhetorical
Himerius (c. 315 AD – c. 386 AD) was a Greek sophist and rhetorician.

Düzce

PlousiasDistrict of DüzceDuzce
Himerius was born at Prusias ad Hypium in Bithynia.

Bithynia

ancient BithyniaKingdom of BithyniaBithynian
Himerius was born at Prusias ad Hypium in Bithynia.

Athens

Athens, GreeceAthenianAthenians
He completed his education at Athens, whence he was summoned to Constantinople in 362 by the emperor Julian, possibly to act as his private secretary.

Constantinople

ConstantinopolitanConstantinopolisConstantinopole
He completed his education at Athens, whence he was summoned to Constantinople in 362 by the emperor Julian, possibly to act as his private secretary. They consist of epideictic or "display" speeches after the style of Aristides, the majority of them having been delivered on special occasions, such as the arrival of a new governor, visits to different cities (Thessalonica, Constantinople), or the death of friends or well-known personages.

Julian (emperor)

JulianJulian the ApostateEmperor Julian
He completed his education at Athens, whence he was summoned to Constantinople in 362 by the emperor Julian, possibly to act as his private secretary.

Isocrates

Isocrates IsocrateanIsokrates
After the death of Julian in the following year Himerius returned to Athens, where he established a school of rhetoric, which he compared with that of Isocrates and the Delphic oracle, owing to the number of those who flocked from all parts of the world to hear him.

Pythia

Delphic OracleOracle of DelphiOracle at Delphi
After the death of Julian in the following year Himerius returned to Athens, where he established a school of rhetoric, which he compared with that of Isocrates and the Delphic oracle, owing to the number of those who flocked from all parts of the world to hear him.

Basil of Caesarea

Basil the GreatSt. BasilSaint Basil
Amongst his pupils were Gregory of Nazianzus and Basil the Great, bishop of Caesarea.

Mithraism

MithrasMithraicMithraic mysteries
Although a pagan, who had been initiated into the mysteries of Mithras by Julian, his works show no attacks against the Christians.

Christians

ChristianNasranibelievers
Although a pagan, who had been initiated into the mysteries of Mithras by Julian, his works show no attacks against the Christians.

August Immanuel Bekker

Immanuel BekkerI. BekkerBekker
165, 243 Bekker) had read 71 speeches by him, of 36 of which he has given an epitome; 24 have come down to us complete and fragments of 12 others.

Aristides

AristeidesAristides the Just
They consist of epideictic or "display" speeches after the style of Aristides, the majority of them having been delivered on special occasions, such as the arrival of a new governor, visits to different cities (Thessalonica, Constantinople), or the death of friends or well-known personages.

Thessaloniki

ThessalonicaSalonikaSalonica
They consist of epideictic or "display" speeches after the style of Aristides, the majority of them having been delivered on special occasions, such as the arrival of a new governor, visits to different cities (Thessalonica, Constantinople), or the death of friends or well-known personages.

Plato

Plato's dialoguesDialogues of PlatoPlatonic dialogues
The Polemarchicus, like the Menexenus of Plato and the Epitaphios Logos of Hypereides, is a panegyric of those who had given their lives for their country; it is so called because it was originally the duty of the polemarch to arrange the funeral games in honour of those who had fallen in battle.

Hypereides

HyperidesYpereides
The Polemarchicus, like the Menexenus of Plato and the Epitaphios Logos of Hypereides, is a panegyric of those who had given their lives for their country; it is so called because it was originally the duty of the polemarch to arrange the funeral games in honour of those who had fallen in battle. Other declamations, only known from the excerpts in Photius, were imaginary orations put into the mouth of famous persons--Demosthenes advocating the recall of Aeschines from banishment, Hypereides supporting the policy of Demosthenes, Themistocles inveighing against the king of Persia, an orator unnamed attacking the philosopher Epicurus for denying the doctrine of divine providence before a court in Athens.

Demosthenes

Démosthène Demosthenes Demosthenem
Other declamations, only known from the excerpts in Photius, were imaginary orations put into the mouth of famous persons--Demosthenes advocating the recall of Aeschines from banishment, Hypereides supporting the policy of Demosthenes, Themistocles inveighing against the king of Persia, an orator unnamed attacking the philosopher Epicurus for denying the doctrine of divine providence before a court in Athens.

Aeschines

Aeschinisthe famous orator
Other declamations, only known from the excerpts in Photius, were imaginary orations put into the mouth of famous persons--Demosthenes advocating the recall of Aeschines from banishment, Hypereides supporting the policy of Demosthenes, Themistocles inveighing against the king of Persia, an orator unnamed attacking the philosopher Epicurus for denying the doctrine of divine providence before a court in Athens.

Themistocles

ThemistoklesNaval Law of ThemistoclesThemistokleous
Other declamations, only known from the excerpts in Photius, were imaginary orations put into the mouth of famous persons--Demosthenes advocating the recall of Aeschines from banishment, Hypereides supporting the policy of Demosthenes, Themistocles inveighing against the king of Persia, an orator unnamed attacking the philosopher Epicurus for denying the doctrine of divine providence before a court in Athens.

List of monarchs of Persia

Shah of IranShahKing of Persia
Other declamations, only known from the excerpts in Photius, were imaginary orations put into the mouth of famous persons--Demosthenes advocating the recall of Aeschines from banishment, Hypereides supporting the policy of Demosthenes, Themistocles inveighing against the king of Persia, an orator unnamed attacking the philosopher Epicurus for denying the doctrine of divine providence before a court in Athens.