Hinduism

HinduHindusHindu cultureSanatana DharmaHindu religionHindu synthesisHinduistHindu religious textsHindu spiritualityhinduistic
Hinduism is the world's third largest religion.wikipedia
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Dharma

DhammaDharmicdharmas
It is an Indian religion and dharma, or way of life, widely practised in the Indian subcontinent and parts of Southeast Asia. Prominent themes in Hindu beliefs include the four Puruṣārthas, the proper goals or aims of human life, namely Dharma (ethics/duties), Artha (prosperity/work), Kama (desires/passions) and Moksha (liberation/freedom from the cycle of death and rebirth/salvation); karma (action, intent and consequences), Saṃsāra (cycle of death and rebirth), and the various Yogas (paths or practices to attain moksha).
dhamma) is a key concept with multiple meanings in Indian religions, such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism and others.

Hinduism in Indonesia

HinduHinduismIndonesia
It is an Indian religion and dharma, or way of life, widely practised in the Indian subcontinent and parts of Southeast Asia.
Hinduism is one of the six official religions of Indonesia.

Hindu texts

Hindu scripturesHindu scriptureHindu literature
Although Hinduism contains a broad range of philosophies, it is linked by shared concepts, recognisable rituals, cosmology, shared textual resources, and pilgrimage to sacred sites. Hindu texts are classified into Śruti ("heard") and Smṛti ("remembered").
Hindu texts are manuscripts and historical literature related to any of the diverse traditions within Hinduism.

Sanātanī

SanataniSanatanSanatan Dharma
Hinduism has been called the oldest religion in the world, and some practitioners and scholars refer to it as Sanātana Dharma, "the eternal tradition", or the "eternal way", beyond human history.
Sanātanī is a term used within Hinduism to describe denominations that adhere to what is sometimes known as orthodox Hinduism.

Hindu temple

MandirHindu templestemple
These texts discuss theology, philosophy, mythology, Vedic yajna, Yoga, agamic rituals, and temple building, among other topics.
It is a structure designed to bring human beings and gods together, using symbolism to express the ideas and beliefs of Hinduism.

Yoga

yogicyogiYog
These texts discuss theology, philosophy, mythology, Vedic yajna, Yoga, agamic rituals, and temple building, among other topics.
There is a broad variety of yoga schools, practices, and goals in Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism.

Smriti

smṛtiSmritisSmrti
Hindu texts are classified into Śruti ("heard") and Smṛti ("remembered").
Smriti (स्मृति, IAST: ), literally "that which is remembered" are a body of Hindu texts usually attributed to an author, traditionally written down, in contrast to Śrutis (the Vedic literature) considered authorless, that were transmitted verbally across the generations and fixed.

Yajna

yagnayajñaVajapeya
These texts discuss theology, philosophy, mythology, Vedic yajna, Yoga, agamic rituals, and temple building, among other topics.
Yajna (IAST: ) literally means "devotion, worship, offering", and refers in Hinduism to any ritual done in front of a sacred fire, often with mantras.

Vedas

VedicVedaVedic literature
These texts discuss theology, philosophy, mythology, Vedic yajna, Yoga, agamic rituals, and temple building, among other topics.
Composed in Vedic Sanskrit, the texts constitute the oldest layer of Sanskrit literature and the oldest scriptures of Hinduism.

Moksha

liberationmuktimoksa
Prominent themes in Hindu beliefs include the four Puruṣārthas, the proper goals or aims of human life, namely Dharma (ethics/duties), Artha (prosperity/work), Kama (desires/passions) and Moksha (liberation/freedom from the cycle of death and rebirth/salvation); karma (action, intent and consequences), Saṃsāra (cycle of death and rebirth), and the various Yogas (paths or practices to attain moksha).
Moksha, also called vimoksha, vimukti and mukti, is a term in Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism which refers to various forms of emancipation, enlightenment, liberation, and release.

Artha

wealth
Prominent themes in Hindu beliefs include the four Puruṣārthas, the proper goals or aims of human life, namely Dharma (ethics/duties), Artha (prosperity/work), Kama (desires/passions) and Moksha (liberation/freedom from the cycle of death and rebirth/salvation); karma (action, intent and consequences), Saṃsāra (cycle of death and rebirth), and the various Yogas (paths or practices to attain moksha).
Artha is also a broader concept in the scriptures of Hinduism.

Hindu denominations

Hindu denominationdenominationsHindu sects
The four largest denominations of Hinduism are the Vaishnavism, Shaivism, Shaktism and Smartism.
Hindu denominations are traditions within Hinduism centered on one or more gods or goddesses, such as Shiva, Vishnu and Brahma.

Reincarnation

reincarnatedrebirthpast lives
Prominent themes in Hindu beliefs include the four Puruṣārthas, the proper goals or aims of human life, namely Dharma (ethics/duties), Artha (prosperity/work), Kama (desires/passions) and Moksha (liberation/freedom from the cycle of death and rebirth/salvation); karma (action, intent and consequences), Saṃsāra (cycle of death and rebirth), and the various Yogas (paths or practices to attain moksha).
Reincarnation is a central tenet of Indian religions, namely Jainism, Buddhism, Sikhism and Hinduism, although there are Hindu groups that do not believe in reincarnation but believe in an afterlife.

Shaivism

ShaivaShaiviteSaivite
The four largest denominations of Hinduism are the Vaishnavism, Shaivism, Shaktism and Smartism.
Shaivism (Śaivam; சைவம்; Devanagari: शैव संप्रदाय; শৈৱ; শৈব; శైవ సాంప్రదాయం; ಶೈವ ಸಂಪ್ರದಾಯ; ശൈവമതം;ଶିବ ସମ୍ପ୍ରଦାୟଂ; ශිවාගම/ශෛවවාදය) is one of the major traditions within Hinduism that reveres Shiva as the Supreme Being.

Shaktism

ShaktaSaktaSaktism
The four largest denominations of Hinduism are the Vaishnavism, Shaivism, Shaktism and Smartism.
Shaktism (Sanskrit:, lit., "doctrine of energy, power, the eternal Goddess") is a major tradition of Hinduism, wherein the metaphysical reality is considered metaphorically feminine and Adi Parashakti is supreme.

Japa

Japa Yogachantingjapa-yoga
Hindu practices include rituals such as puja (worship) and recitations, japa, meditation, family-oriented rites of passage, annual festivals, and occasional pilgrimages.
It is a practice found in Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism, Buddhism, and Shintōism.

Religion in India

religionIndiareligions of India
Hinduism is the most widely professed faith in India, Nepal and Mauritius.
The Indian subcontinent is the birthplace of four of the world's major religions; namely Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Sikhism.

Hinduism by country

Hindu diasporaWorld Hinduism1 billion followers
Hinduism is the world's third largest religion; its followers, known as Hindus, constitute about 1.15 billion, or 15–16% of the global population.
Along with Christianity (31.5%), Islam (23.2%), Hinduism is one of the three major religions of the world by percentage of population.

Religion in Mauritius

Mauritius
Hinduism is the most widely professed faith in India, Nepal and Mauritius.
Mauritius is a religiously diverse nation, with Hinduism being the most widely professed faith.

Vedic period

VedicVedic civilizationVedic age
This "Hindu synthesis" started to develop between 500 BCE and 300 CE, after the end of the Vedic period (1500 to 500 BCE), and flourished in the medieval period, with the decline of Buddhism in India.
Vedic religion developed into Brahmanical orthodoxy, and around the beginning of the Common Era, the Vedic tradition formed one of the main constituents of"Hindu synthesis".

Sannyasa

sannyasisanyasisannyasin
Some Hindus leave their social world and material possessions, then engage in lifelong Sannyasa (monastic practices) to achieve Moksha.
An individual in Sanyasa is known as a Sannyasi (male) or Sannyasini (female) in Hinduism, which in many ways parallel to the Sadhu and Sadhvi traditions of Jain monasticism, the bhikkhus and bhikkhunis of Buddhism and the monk and nun traditions of Christianity.

Sanskrit

Sanskrit languageClassical SanskritSkt.
The word Hindū is derived from Indo-Aryan/Sanskrit root Sindhu.
It is the primary liturgical language of Hinduism and the predominant language of most works of Hindu philosophy as well as some of the principal texts of Buddhism and Jainism.

Ahiṃsā

Ahimsanon-violenceAhinsa
Hinduism prescribes the eternal duties, such as honesty, refraining from injuring living beings (ahimsa), patience, forbearance, self-restraint, and compassion, among others.
Ahimsa is one of the cardinal virtues and an important tenet of Jainism where it is first of the Pancha Mahavrata and Hinduism, and in Buddhism where it is the first of the five precepts.

Bali

Bali, IndonesiaBalineseBali Island
It is also the predominant religion in Bali, Indonesia.
This marriage also brought more Hinduism and Javanese culture to Bali.

Yoga (philosophy)

YogaYoga philosophyphilosophy of yoga
Of the historical division into six darsanas (philosophies), two schools, Vedanta and Yoga, are currently the most prominent.
Yoga philosophy is one of the six major orthodox schools of Hinduism.