Hippocrates

HippocraticHippocrates of CosHippocrates of KosHippokratesHippocrateanHipocrateHippocratic medicineHippocratic school of medicineHippocratic theoryBuqrat
Hippocrates of Kos, also known as Hippocrates II, was a Greek physician of the Age of Pericles (Classical Greece), who is considered one of the most outstanding figures in the history of medicine.wikipedia
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Ancient Greek medicine

Greek physicianGreek medicineMedicine in ancient Greece
This intellectual school revolutionized medicine in ancient Greece, establishing it as a discipline distinct from other fields with which it had traditionally been associated (theurgy and philosophy), thus establishing medicine as a profession.
Hippocrates, known as the "Father of Modern Medicine", established a medical school at Cos and is the most important figure in ancient Greek medicine.

Hippocratic Corpus

HippocraticAphorismsCorpus Hippocraticum
However, the achievements of the writers of the Corpus, the practitioners of Hippocratic medicine and the actions of Hippocrates himself were often conflated; thus very little is known about what Hippocrates actually thought, wrote, and did. He is also credited with greatly advancing the systematic study of clinical medicine, summing up the medical knowledge of previous schools, and prescribing practices for physicians through the Hippocratic Corpus and other works.
The Hippocratic Corpus (Latin: Corpus Hippocraticum), or Hippocratic Collection, is a collection of around 60 early Ancient Greek medical works strongly associated with the physician Hippocrates and his teachings.

Fifth-century Athens

Age of PericlesGolden Age of AthensGolden Age
Hippocrates of Kos, also known as Hippocrates II, was a Greek physician of the Age of Pericles (Classical Greece), who is considered one of the most outstanding figures in the history of medicine.
The playwrights Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides all lived and worked in 5th century BC Athens, as did the historians Herodotus and Thucydides, the physician Hippocrates, and the philosophers Plato and Socrates.

History of medicine

medical historianmedicinehistorian of medicine
Hippocrates of Kos, also known as Hippocrates II, was a Greek physician of the Age of Pericles (Classical Greece), who is considered one of the most outstanding figures in the history of medicine.
A towering figure in the history of medicine was the physician Hippocrates of Kos (c.

Hippocratic Oath

The Hippocratic OathOathOath of Hippocrates
Hippocrates is commonly portrayed as the paragon of the ancient physician, and credited with coining the Hippocratic Oath, which is still relevant and in use today.
Although it is traditionally attributed to the Greek doctor Hippocrates and it is usually included in the Hippocratic Corpus, most modern scholars do not regard it as having been written by Hippocrates himself.

Polybus (physician)

Polybus
The two sons of Hippocrates, Thessalus and Draco, and his son-in-law, Polybus, were his students.
Polybus (fl. c. 400 BC) was one of the pupils of Hippocrates, and also his son-in-law.

Galen

Galen of PergamonGalenic medicineGalenus
According to Galen, a later physician, Polybus was Hippocrates' true successor, while Thessalus and Draco each had a son named Hippocrates (Hippocrates III and IV).
Galen's understanding of anatomy and medicine was principally influenced by the then-current theory of humorism (also known as the four humors – black bile, yellow bile, blood, and phlegm), as advanced by ancient Greek physicians such as Hippocrates.

Larissa

LarisaLarissa, GreeceArchbishop of Larissa
He died, probably in Larissa, at the age of 83, 85 or 90, though some say he lived to be well over 100.
Hippocrates, the "Father of Medicine", died here.

Thessalus (physician)

ThessalusThessalos
The two sons of Hippocrates, Thessalus and Draco, and his son-in-law, Polybus, were his students.
Thessalus,, a physician from ancient Greece, and the son of Hippocrates, the famous physician.

Asclepeion

AsclepieionAsclepieiaAsclepion
Hippocrates was probably trained at the asklepieion of Kos, and took lessons from the Thracian physician Herodicus of Selymbria.
Hippocrates is said to have received his medical training at an asclepeion on the isle of Kos.

Hippocrates (physicians)

HippocratesHippocrates (physician)Hippocrates I
Hippocrates of Kos, also known as Hippocrates II, was a Greek physician of the Age of Pericles (Classical Greece), who is considered one of the most outstanding figures in the history of medicine. According to Galen, a later physician, Polybus was Hippocrates' true successor, while Thessalus and Draco each had a son named Hippocrates (Hippocrates III and IV). Soranus said that Hippocrates learned medicine from his father and grandfather (Hippocrates I), and studied other subjects with Democritus and Gorgias.
Hippocrates was the name of several physicians in the time of Ancient Greece, some of whom were in the same family as the celebrated Hippocrates of Kos (Hippocrates II).

Draco (physician)

DracoDraco II
The two sons of Hippocrates, Thessalus and Draco, and his son-in-law, Polybus, were his students.
Draco (or Dracon, Δράκον) was the name of several physicians in the family of Hippocrates.

Vis medicatrix naturae

naturevis medicatrix naturæ
The therapeutic approach was based on "the healing power of nature" ("vis medicatrix naturae" in Latin).
Vis medicatrix naturae (literally "the healing power of nature", and also known as natura medica) is the Latin rendering of the Greek Νόσων φύσεις ἰητροί ("Nature is the physician(s) of diseases"), a phrase attributed to Hippocrates.

Gorgias

Encomium of HelenGorgias of LeontiniGorgianic
Soranus said that Hippocrates learned medicine from his father and grandfather (Hippocrates I), and studied other subjects with Democritus and Gorgias.
Additionally, although they are not described as his students, Gorgias is widely thought to have influenced the styles of the historian Thucydides, the tragic playwright Agathon, the doctor Hippocrates, the rhetorician Alcidamas, and the poet and commentator Lycophron.

Democritus

Democritus of AbderaDemocriteanAtomism
Soranus said that Hippocrates learned medicine from his father and grandfather (Hippocrates I), and studied other subjects with Democritus and Gorgias.
Diogenes Laertius says that he was friends with Hippocrates, and he quotes Demetrius saying: "It would seem that he also went to Athens and was not anxious to be recognized, because he despised fame, and that while he knew of Socrates, he was not known to Socrates, his words being, `I came to Athens and no one knew me.'" Aristotle placed him among the pre-Socratic natural philosophers.

Kos

CosCoanKos Island
Hippocrates was probably trained at the asklepieion of Kos, and took lessons from the Thracian physician Herodicus of Selymbria. Historians agree that Hippocrates was born around the year 460 BC on the Greek island of Kos; other biographical information, however, is likely to be untrue. The Hippocratic school or Koan school achieved greater success by applying general diagnoses and passive treatments.
The island first became a center for learning during the Ptolemaic dynasty, and Hippocrates, Apelles, Philitas and possibly Theocritus came from the area.

Hippocratic bench

The Hippocratic bench and other devices were used to this end.
The Hippocratic bench or scamnum was a device invented by Hippocrates (c.

Humorism

humorshumoursfour humours
However, Hippocrates did work with many convictions that were based on what is now known to be incorrect anatomy and physiology, such as Humorism.
Hippocrates is the one usually credited with applying this idea to medicine.

Asclepiad (title)

AsclepiadAsclepiades of Bithynia
Plato mentions Hippocrates in two of his dialogues: in Protagoras, Plato describes Hippocrates as "Hippocrates of Kos, the Asclepiad"; while in Phaedrus, Plato suggests that "Hippocrates the Asclepiad" thought that a complete knowledge of the nature of the body was necessary for medicine.
Asclepiad (Greek: Ἀσκληπιάδης, pl.: Ἀσκληπιάδαι) was a title borne by many Ancient Greek medical doctors, notably Hippocrates of Kos.

Medical diagnosis

diagnosisdiagnosticdiagnostic criteria
The Hippocratic school or Koan school achieved greater success by applying general diagnoses and passive treatments.
Hippocrates was known to make diagnoses by tasting his patients' urine and smelling their sweat.

Soranus of Ephesus

SoranusSoranosSoranum Ephesium
Soranus of Ephesus, a 2nd-century Greek physician, was Hippocrates' first biographer and is the source of most personal information about him.
The Life of Hippocrates probably formed one of the collection of medical biographies by Soranus referred to in the Suda, and is valuable as the only authority for the life of the great physician, with the exception of articles in the Suda and in Stephanus of Byzantium (s.v. Κώς).

Herodicus

Herodicus of Selymbria
Hippocrates was probably trained at the asklepieion of Kos, and took lessons from the Thracian physician Herodicus of Selymbria.
The first use of therapeutic exercise for the treatment of disease and maintenance of health is credited to him, and he is believed to have been one of the tutors of Hippocrates.

Medicine

medicalmedical scienceclinical medicine
He is also credited with greatly advancing the systematic study of clinical medicine, summing up the medical knowledge of previous schools, and prescribing practices for physicians through the Hippocratic Corpus and other works.
While the laws generally require medical doctors to be trained in "evidence based", Western, or Hippocratic Medicine, they are not intended to discourage different paradigms of health.

Nail clubbing

clubbingdigital clubbingfinger clubbing
He is given credit for the first description of clubbing of the fingers, an important diagnostic sign in chronic lung disease, lung cancer and cyanotic heart disease.
Clubbing has been recognized as a sign of disease since the time of Hippocrates.

Physiology

physiologistphysiologicalphysiologically
However, Hippocrates did work with many convictions that were based on what is now known to be incorrect anatomy and physiology, such as Humorism.
The study of human physiology as a medical field originates in classical Greece, at the time of Hippocrates (late 5th century BC).