A report on Historically black colleges and universities

Cheyney University was founded in 1837 as the Institute for Colored Youth, making it the oldest HBCU in the nation
President George H. W. Bush signs a new Executive Order on historically black colleges and universities in the White House Rose Garden, April 1989
North Carolina A&T State University is the largest HBCU in the nation.
Vice President Kamala Harris with black students attending Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Booker T. Washington, educator, orator, and advisor (Hampton)
W. E. B. Du Bois, sociologist, historian, and activist (Fisk)
Thurgood Marshall, first Black Supreme Court justice (Lincoln, Howard)
Martin Luther King Jr., leader of the civil rights movement (Morehouse)
Toni Morrison, acclaimed novelist and Nobel laureate (Howard)
Jesse Jackson, minister and politician (North Carolina A&T)
Ruth Simmons, first African-American president in the Ivy League (Dillard)
Samuel L. Jackson, actor and film producer (Morehouse)
Oprah Winfrey, talk show host and media mogul (Tenn State)
Spike Lee, film director and producer (Morehouse)
Kamala Harris, Vice President of the United States (Howard)
Taraji P. Henson, actress (Howard)
Common, rapper and actor (Florida A&M)
Chadwick Boseman actor and playwright (Howard)

Historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) are institutions of higher education in the United States that were established before the Civil Rights Act of 1964 with the intention of primarily serving the African-American community.

- Historically black colleges and universities
Cheyney University was founded in 1837 as the Institute for Colored Youth, making it the oldest HBCU in the nation

63 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Locations of eight Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference members

Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference

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Locations of eight Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference members

The Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) is a collegiate athletic conference whose full members are historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in the Southeastern and the Mid-Atlantic United States.

Southwestern Athletic Conference

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A medal podium at the 2021 SWAC Outdoor Track and Field Championship

The Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC) is a collegiate athletic conference headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama, which is made up of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in the Southern United States.

Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association

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College athletic conference affiliated with the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) at the Division II level.

College athletic conference affiliated with the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) at the Division II level.

CIAA institutions mostly consist of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs).

Tuskegee University

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History class at Tuskegee, 1902
Original campus buildings on the Miller plantation, 1882
Booker T. Washington
The Oaks, Booker T. Washington's home on the Tuskegee campus, c. 1906
George Washington Carver (front row, center) poses with fellow faculty of Tuskegee Institute in this c. 1902 photograph taken by Frances Benjamin Johnston.
Tuskegee Institute, c. 1916
Tuskegee University Chapel (1969)
The Tuskegee University Kellogg Hotel & Conference Center
A view of the Tuskegee University campus – White Hall bell tower
College of Veterinary Medicine – Fredrick D Patterson Hall
College of Engineering – Luther H. Foster Hall has long been home to one of the nation's best engineering programs containing: Aerospace Science Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Materials Science Engineering, Mechanical and Military Science
Tuskegee University School of Nursing – Basil O'Connor Hall. Tuskegee Institute Training School of Nurses was registered with the State Board of Nursing in Alabama in September 1892 under the auspices of Tuskegee University's John A. Andrew Memorial Hospital. In 1948, the School began its baccalaureate program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing. This program has the distinction of being the first Baccalaureate Nursing program in the State of Alabama.
Robert R. Taylor School of Architecture and Construction Science is home to one of only 2 NAAB-accredited, architecture professional degree programs in the state of Alabama. It is also home to one of the top Construction Science and Management degree programs in the nation.
Tuskegee University's historic Cleveland Leigh Abbott Memorial Alumni Stadium, completed 1924. The stadium was the first of its kind to be built at any HBCU in the south.
The Lifting the Veil of Ignorance statue of Booker T. Washington was designed by sculptor Charles Keck and unveiled on April 5, 1922. The statue depicts Dr. Washington lifting the veil of ignorance off his people, who had once been enslaved, by showing them the ways of a better life through education and skills.
James Henry Meriwether Henderson Hall is Tuskegee University's new Agricultural Life Science Teaching, Extension and Research Building. Henderson Hall provides labs for teaching introductory courses in animal, plant, soil, and environmental sciences as well as biology and chemistry.
Built in 1906 and completely renovated in 2013, Tompkins Hall serves as the primary student dining facility and student center. The building includes a ballroom, an auditorium, a game room, a retail restaurant, and a 24-hour student study with healthy food vending machines. It is home to the offices of the Student Government Association.
The Legacy Museum houses: The African collection (contains approximately 900 items), the antiques and miscellaneous items collection and The Lovette W. Harper Collection of African Art. Third Floor exhibition contains "The United States Public Health Service Untreated Syphilis Study in the Negro Male, Macon County, Alabama 1932-1972."
Booker T. Washington is laid to rest in the Tuskegee University Campus Cemetery. Many other notable university people are interred on the Tuskegee campus including: George Washington Carver, Cleveland L. Abbott, William L. Dawson, Luther Hilton Foster (4th president), Frederick D. Patterson (3rd president), many other Washington family members and others.
Tuskegee University provides on-campus apartment style living for students in the Commons Apartments located across the campus in three different locations
Margaret Murray Washington Hall is home to Office of Admission, University Bookstore and additional dining services for the students
"The Avenue" is one of the main pedestrian corridors on campus that is rarely open to vehicular traffic
Booker T. Washington Boulevard is the main drive into the campus of Tuskegee University
Tuskegee University's campus has a park like setting and features many large green areas
College of Veterinary Medicine Williams Bowie Hall
Tuskegee football game
Main entrance to the campus
A scenic campus corridor
Interior view of the Tuskegee Chapel
Fall at Tuskegee University
George Washington Carver Museum
The Main Library, Hollis Burke Frissell now known as the Ford Motor Company Library/Learning Resource Center
Campus banners
Andrew F. Brimmer College of Business and Information Sciences
Daniel "Chappie" James Center
Daniel "Chappie" James Center -Tuskegee basketball pre-game warm-up
Daniel "Chappie" James Center basketball game
Tuskegee University campus partial view of the "Valley" and the Kellogg Hotel & Conference Center
I-85 exit for Tuskegee University

Tuskegee University (Tuskegee or TU) is a private, historically black land-grant university in Tuskegee, Alabama.

African Americans

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Ethnic group consisting of Americans with partial or total ancestry from sub-Saharan Africa.

Ethnic group consisting of Americans with partial or total ancestry from sub-Saharan Africa.

Slaves processing tobacco in 17th-century Virginia, illustration from 1670
The first slave auction at New Amsterdam in 1655, illustration from 1895 by Howard Pyle
Reproduction of a handbill advertising a slave auction in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1769
Crispus Attucks, the first "martyr" of the American Revolution. He was of Native American and African-American descent.
Frederick Douglass, ca 1850
Slaves Waiting for Sale: Richmond, Virginia, 1853. Note the new clothes. The domestic slave trade broke up many families, and individuals lost their connection to families and clans.
Harriet Tubman, around 1869
A group of White men pose for a 1919 photograph as they stand over the Black victim Will Brown who had been lynched and had his body mutilated and burned during the Omaha race riot of 1919 in Omaha, Nebraska. Postcards and photographs of lynchings were popular souvenirs in the U.S.
Rosa Parks being fingerprinted after being arrested for not giving up her seat on a bus to a White person
March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, August 28, 1963, shows civil rights leaders and union leaders
Black Lives Matter protest in response to the fatal shooting of Philando Castile in July 2016
Proportion of African Americans in each U.S. state, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico as of the 2020 United States Census
U.S. Census map indicating U.S. counties with fewer than 25 Black or African-American inhabitants
Graph showing the percentage of the African-American population living in the American South, 1790–2010. Note the major declines between 1910 and 1940 and 1940–1970, and the reverse trend post-1970. Nonetheless, the absolute majority of the African-American population has always lived in the American South.
Former slave reading, 1870
Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson is director of New York City's Hayden Planetarium
The US homeownership rate according to race
This graph shows the real median US household income by race: 1967 to 2011, in 2011 dollars.
"Lift Every Voice and Sing" being sung by the family of Barack Obama, Smokey Robinson and others in the White House in 2014
Genetic clustering of 128 African Americans, by Zakharaia et al. (2009). Each vertical bar represents an individual. The color scheme of the bar plot matches that in the PCA plot.
Al Sharpton led the Commitment March: Get Your Knee Off Our Necks protest on August 28, 2020.
Although the ban on interracial marriage ended in California in 1948, entertainer Sammy Davis Jr. faced a backlash for his involvement with a White woman in 1957
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. remains the most prominent political leader in the American civil rights movement and perhaps the most influential African-American political figure in general.
BET founder Robert L. Johnson with former U.S. President George W. Bush
A traditional soul food dinner consisting of fried chicken with macaroni and cheese, collard greens, breaded fried okra and cornbread
Mount Zion United Methodist Church is the oldest African-American congregation in Washington, D.C.
Masjid Malcolm Shabazz in Harlem, New York City
This parade float displayed the word "Afro-Americans" in 1911.
Michelle Obama was the First Lady of the United States; she and her husband, President Barack Obama, are the first African Americans to hold these positions.
Racially segregated Negro section of keypunch operators at the US Census Bureau

To maintain self-esteem and dignity, African Americans such as Anthony Overton and Mary McLeod Bethune continued to build their own schools, churches, banks, social clubs, and other businesses.

Lincoln University (Pennsylvania)

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Brown Memorial Chapel
The Student Union Building (SUB)
alt=Civil rights activist James Farmer|James Farmer
alt=Fritz Pollard, posing with a football|Fritz Pollard

Lincoln University (LU) is a public state-related historically black university near Oxford, Pennsylvania.

Morehouse College

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A view of an entrance to the campus' courtyard.
Morehouse's 2013 graduates during President Obama commencement address
Graves Hall, Century Campus, and Benjamin Mays' tomb
Kilgore Campus Center
Ray Charles Performing Arts Center
Historic Chapel Bell outside of Sale Hall
Obelisk in front of King Chapel dedicated to theologian and civil rights leader Howard Thurman
2005–2006 Morehouse College Mock Trial Team after it obtained an "Honorable Mention" award in their first appearance at the American Mock Trial Association National Championship Tournament in 2006
Martin Luther King Jr. delivering "I Have a Dream" at the 1963 Washington, D.C. Civil Rights March

Morehouse College is a private historically black men's liberal arts college in Atlanta, Georgia.

Clark Atlanta University

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Stone Hall, c. 1910
Bust of W.E.B. DuBois by Ayokunle Odeleye at Clark Atlanta University

Clark Atlanta University (CAU or Clark Atlanta) is a private, Methodist, historically black research university in Atlanta, Georgia.

Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference

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College athletic conference affiliated with the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) at the Division II level.

College athletic conference affiliated with the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) at the Division II level.

Old SIAC logo

Formed in 1913, it consists mostly of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), with all but one member located in the Southern United States.

Official portrait, 1976

Thurgood Marshall

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American lawyer and civil rights activist who served as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from October 1967 until October 1991.

American lawyer and civil rights activist who served as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from October 1967 until October 1991.

Official portrait, 1976
Henry Highland Garnet School (P.S. 103), where Marshall attended elementary school
Marshall in 1957
Thurgood Marshall photographed in 1967 in the Oval Office
U.S. Senator Ben Cardin (left) and Maryland Attorney General Doug Gansler talk in Lawyers Mall, near a statue of Thurgood Marshall. (October 2007).

He attended Lincoln University, a historically black university in Pennsylvania.