Historically black colleges and universities

Cheyney University was founded in 1837 as the Institute for Colored Youth, making it the oldest HBCU in the nation
President George H. W. Bush signs a new Executive Order on historically black colleges and universities in the White House Rose Garden, April 1989
North Carolina A&T State University is the largest HBCU in the nation.
Vice President Kamala Harris with black students attending Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Booker T. Washington, educator, orator, and advisor (Hampton)
W. E. B. Du Bois, sociologist, historian, and activist (Fisk)
Thurgood Marshall, first Black Supreme Court justice (Lincoln, Howard)
Martin Luther King Jr., leader of the civil rights movement (Morehouse)
Toni Morrison, acclaimed novelist and Nobel laureate (Howard)
Jesse Jackson, minister and politician (North Carolina A&T)
Ruth Simmons, first African-American president in the Ivy League (Dillard)
Samuel L. Jackson, actor and film producer (Morehouse)
Oprah Winfrey, talk show host and media mogul (Tenn State)
Spike Lee, film director and producer (Morehouse)
Kamala Harris, Vice President of the United States (Howard)
Taraji P. Henson, actress (Howard)
Common, rapper and actor (Florida A&M)
Chadwick Boseman actor and playwright (Howard)

Historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) are institutions of higher education in the United States that were established before the Civil Rights Act of 1964 with the intention of primarily serving the African-American community.

- Historically black colleges and universities
Cheyney University was founded in 1837 as the Institute for Colored Youth, making it the oldest HBCU in the nation

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Henry Martin Tupper, founder and first president of Shaw University

Shaw University

Henry Martin Tupper, founder and first president of Shaw University
Shaw Hall
Leonard Medical School (left) and adjoining hospital (right), c.1910
The historic campus of Shaw University
An ad for Shaw University from 1900, placed in a black-owned newspaper in Minnesota.
Estey Hall, c. 2008
James E. Cheek Learning Resources Center
Leonard Hall, c. 2008
W. C. Strudwick (1884–1932) in Shaw University football uniform, future graduate from Leonard Medical School (class of 1912) and physician in Durham, NC
Willie E Gary, one of the richest lawyers in the world.
Gladys Knight, lead singer of Gladys Knight & the Pips
Angie Brooks, first African female President of the United Nations General Assembly.

Shaw University is a private Baptist historically black university in Raleigh, North Carolina.

University namesake Clinton B. Fisk

Fisk University

University namesake Clinton B. Fisk
A class c. 1900
John Ogden, co-founder of Fisk University
Jubilee Hall
Students and teachers in training school (between 1890 and 1906)
Theological Hall (later Bennett Hall). The building was demolished.<ref>{{Cite book|last=Cohen|first=Rodney T.|url=https://books.google.com/books?id=8Nw2XHOGMh8C&q=when+was+fisk+university+bennett+hall+demolished%3F&pg=PA16|title=Fisk University|date=2001|publisher=Arcadia Publishing|isbn=978-0-7385-0677-7|language=en}}</ref>
Jubilee Hall
Fisk Memorial Chapel
Cravath Hall
Interior of Cravath Hall
Carnegie Hall

Fisk University is a private historically black university in Nashville, Tennessee.

Tennessee State University

Tennessee State University (Tennessee State, Tenn State, or TSU) is a public historically black land-grant university in Nashville, Tennessee, United States.

Jim Clyburn

American politician and retired educator serving as a Democratic member of the U.S. House of Representatives from South Carolina.

American politician and retired educator serving as a Democratic member of the U.S. House of Representatives from South Carolina.

Clyburn with President Barack Obama as he meets with House leaders
Clyburn with Nancy Pelosi and U2 lead singer Bono in 2006
Clyburn with Biden in 2022
Clyburn with his daughter Mignon in 2013

Clyburn graduated from Mather Academy (later named Boylan-Haven-Mather Academy) in Camden, South Carolina, then attended South Carolina State College (now South Carolina State University), a historically black college in Orangeburg.

Advertisement for Storer College, 1910

Storer College

Advertisement for Storer College, 1910
Undated map of Storer College campus, facing east towards the train station. Does not include Lockwood House, which is off the map toward the train station, on Fillmore Street.
Soldier's Gate, Storer College
Isabelle Stewart, Raymond McNeal, and Odetta Johnson sit on the lawn at school holding a school pennant.
Early photo of teachers and students at Storer College
Early Storer College Normal School Diploma
National Park Service reconstructed classroom at Storer College
Advertisement for Storer College, 1903 (transcription)
Poster announcing John Brown's Fort, Storer College, Harpers Ferry WV
Anthony Hall on the former Storer campus
A Storer College student, 1874. Sketch by Porte Crayon.
Left to right: Lincoln Hall (boys' dormitory), Anthony Hall, and Myrtle Hall (girls' dormitory). 1889?

Storer College was a historically black college in Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, that operated from 1867 to 1955.

Sign for "colored" waiting room at a Greyhound bus terminal in Rome, Georgia, 1943. Throughout the South there were Jim Crow laws creating "de jure" legally required segregation

Racial segregation in the United States

Segregation of facilities and services such as housing, medical care, education, employment, and transportation in the United States along racial lines.

Segregation of facilities and services such as housing, medical care, education, employment, and transportation in the United States along racial lines.

Sign for "colored" waiting room at a Greyhound bus terminal in Rome, Georgia, 1943. Throughout the South there were Jim Crow laws creating "de jure" legally required segregation
"We Cater to White Trade Only" sign on a restaurant window in Lancaster, Ohio in 1938. Ohio, like most of the North and West did not have de jure statutory enforced segregation (Jim Crow laws), but in many places still had social segregation (de facto) in the early 20th century.
An African-American man drinking at a "colored" drinking fountain in a streetcar terminal in Oklahoma City, 1939.
A black man goes into the "colored" entrance of a movie theater in Belzoni, Mississippi, 1939.
Although the ban on interracial marriage ended in California in 1948, entertainer Sammy Davis Jr. faced a backlash for his involvement with a white woman in 1957
Colored Sailors room in World War I
A black military policeman on a motorcycle in front of the "colored" MP entrance during World War II
Negro section of keypunch operators at the U.S. Census Bureau
Founded by former Confederate soldiers after the Civil War (1861–1865), the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) used violence and intimidation to prevent blacks from voting, holding political office and attending school
Stand in the Schoolhouse Door: Governor George Wallace attempts to block the enrollment of black students at the University of Alabama.
White tenants seeking to prevent blacks from moving into the Sojourner Truth housing project erected this sign. Detroit, 1942.
A sign posted above a bar that reads "No beer sold to Indians" (Native Americans). Birney, Montana, 1941.
Discrimination in a restaurant in Juneau, Alaska in 1908: "All White Help."
The Rex theater for colored people, Leland, Mississippi, 1937
Residential segregation in Milwaukee, the most segregated city in America according to the 2000 US Census. The cluster of blue dots represent black residents.
A "Colored School" in South Carolina, ca.1878

The American Missionary Association supported the development and establishment of several historically black colleges including Fisk University and Shaw University.

National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics

College athletics association for small colleges and universities in North America.

College athletics association for small colleges and universities in North America.

NAIA headquarters near the Power and Light District and Sprint Center in Downtown Kansas City.

The association furthered its commitment to African-American athletes when, in 1953, it became the first collegiate association to invite historically black colleges and universities into its membership.

Lee at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival

Spike Lee

American film director, producer, screenwriter, actor, and professor.

American film director, producer, screenwriter, actor, and professor.

Lee at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival
Lee circa 1990s
Lee at the 1999 Cannes Film Festival
Lee at the 2009 Tribeca Film Festival
Lee and his cast promoting BlacKkKlansman at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival
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Lee enrolled in Morehouse College, a historically black college in Atlanta, where he made his first student film, Last Hustle in Brooklyn.

Justin Smith Morrill

Morrill Land-Grant Acts

The Morrill Land-Grant Acts are United States statutes that allowed for the creation of land-grant colleges in U.S. states using the proceeds from sales of federally-owned land, often obtained from indigenous tribes through treaty, cession, or seizure.

The Morrill Land-Grant Acts are United States statutes that allowed for the creation of land-grant colleges in U.S. states using the proceeds from sales of federally-owned land, often obtained from indigenous tribes through treaty, cession, or seizure.

Justin Smith Morrill
Most Land-Grant Universities
Morrill Hall, on the campus of the University of Maryland, College Park (a land-grant university), is named for Senator Justin Morrill, in honor of the act he sponsored.
Beaumont Tower at Michigan State University marks the site of College Hall which is the first building in the United States to teach agricultural science.
Celebration of the 150th Anniversary of the Morrill Act, at the Library of Congress, June 23, 2012
James H. Billington and Vartan Gregorian at the Celebration of the 150th Anniversary of the Morrill Act, 2012

Among the seventy colleges and universities which eventually evolved from the Morrill Acts are several of today's historically Black colleges and universities.

Alma Adams

American politician who represents North Carolina's 12th congressional district in the United States House of Representatives.

American politician who represents North Carolina's 12th congressional district in the United States House of Representatives.

Alma Adams in 2020

Adams chairs the North Carolina Legislative Black Caucus Foundation, which gives scholarships to students who attend one of North Carolina's Historically Black Colleges and Universities.