The "Big Three" at the Yalta Conference, Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin. Behind them stand, from the left, Field Marshal Sir Alan Brooke, Fleet Admiral Ernest King, Fleet Admiral William D. Leahy, General of the Army George Marshall, Major General Laurence S. Kuter, General Aleksei Antonov, Vice Admiral Stepan Kucherov, and Admiral of the Fleet Nikolay Kuznetsov.
Soviet Prime Minister Vyacheslav Molotov signs the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact. Behind him stand (left) Foreign Minister Joachim von Ribbentrop of Germany and (right) Joseph Stalin. The non-aggression pact had a secret protocol attached in which arrangements were made for a partition of Poland's territory.
Soviet, American and British diplomats during the Yalta conference
Polish infantry in action during the Invasion of Poland in September 1939
Yalta American Delegation in Livadia Palace from left to right: Secretary of State Edward Stettinius, Maj. Gen. L. S. Kuter, Admiral E. J. King, General George C. Marshall, Ambassador Averell Harriman, Admiral William Leahy, and President F. D. Roosevelt. Livadia Palace, Crimea, RSFSR
Polish anti-aircraft artillery in September 1939
A Big Three meeting room
Polish cavalry at Battle of the Bzura
Leaders of the Big Three at the negotiating table at the Yalta conference
Survivor of bombing of Warsaw
Allied-occupied territories (red) on 15 February 1945, four days after the end of the conference
Soviet invasion of Poland, September 1939
Poland's old and new borders, 1945 – Kresy in light red
Poland was partitioned in 1939 as agreed by Germany and the Soviet Union in their treaty; division of Polish territories in 1939–41
The eventual partition of Germany into Allied Occupation Zones: {{legend|#69AB69|British zone}} {{legend|#2464D8|French zone (two exclaves) and beginning in 1947, the Saar protectorate}} {{legend|#FCA93E|American zone, including Bremen}} {{legend|#FF5555|Soviet zone, later the GDR}} {{legend|#FFFFCF|Polish and Soviet annexed territory}}
Changes in administration of Polish territories following the 1941 German invasion of the Soviet Union
Partition plan from Winston Churchill: {{legend|#C9A091|North German state}} {{legend|#9195C9|South German state, including modern Austria and Hungary}} {{legend|#92C991|West German state}}
Hans Frank
Morgenthau Plan: {{legend|#FF6464|North German state}} {{legend|#6464FF|South German state}} {{legend|#64ff64|International zone}} {{legend|#C8C8C8|Territory lost from Germany (Saarland to France, Upper Silesia to Poland, East Prussia, partitioned between Poland and the Soviet Union)}}
Public execution of 54 Poles in Rożki village, 1942
From left to right: Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin. Also present are Soviet Foreign Minister Vyacheslav Molotov (far left); Field Marshal Sir Alan Brooke, Admiral of the Fleet Sir Andrew Cunningham, RN, Marshal of the RAF Sir Charles Portal, RAF, (standing behind Churchill); General George C. Marshall, Chief of Staff of the United States Army, and Fleet Admiral William D. Leahy, USN, (standing behind Roosevelt)
Photos from The Black Book of Poland, published in London in 1942 by the Polish Government-in-Exile
One of the mass graves of the Katyn massacre (spring 1940), exhumed in 1943. The number of victims is estimated at 22,000, with a lower limit of confirmed dead of 21,768. Of them 4,421 were from Kozelsk, 3,820 from Starobelsk, 6,311 from Ostashkov, and 7,305 from Byelorussian and Ukrainian prisons.
Wanda Wasilewska
German recruitment poster: "Let's do agricultural work in Germany: report immediately to your Vogt"
An announcement of fifty Poles tried and sentenced to death by a Standgericht in retaliation for the assassination of one German policeman, 1944
Battalion Zośka soldiers in Wola during the Warsaw Uprising
Warsaw Uprising in the Old Town
Starving Jewish children in the Warsaw Ghetto (1940–1943), during the German occupation of Poland
The entrance to the Auschwitz I concentration camp, established by Nazi Germany in Poland
Victims of a massacre committed by the UPA in the village of Lipniki in Volhynia, 1943
Władysław Sikorski
Polish volunteers to Anders' Army, released from a Soviet POW camp
January 1945 aerial photo of destroyed Warsaw
The PKWN Manifesto was issued on 22 July 1944
The legacy of World War II: Poland's old and new borders

In the east, Soviet forces were 65 km from Berlin, having already pushed back the Germans from Poland, Romania, and Bulgaria.

- Yalta Conference

The fate of Poland had been determined in a series of negotiations that included the conferences in Tehran, Yalta, and Potsdam.

- History of Poland (1939–1945)
The "Big Three" at the Yalta Conference, Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin. Behind them stand, from the left, Field Marshal Sir Alan Brooke, Fleet Admiral Ernest King, Fleet Admiral William D. Leahy, General of the Army George Marshall, Major General Laurence S. Kuter, General Aleksei Antonov, Vice Admiral Stepan Kucherov, and Admiral of the Fleet Nikolay Kuznetsov.

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