History of Zanzibar

island's long historylong historyResidentResident of ZanzibarSultanate of ZanzibarZanzibarZanzibar, History of
People have lived in Zanzibar for 20,000 years.wikipedia
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Zanzibar Revolution

revolution1964 revolution1964 Zanzibar Revolution
A month later, the bloody Zanzibar Revolution, in which several thousand Arabs and Indians were killed and thousands more expelled and expropriated, led to the Republic of Zanzibar and Pemba.
With a long history of Arab rule dating back to 1698, Zanzibar was an overseas territory of Oman until it achieved independence in 1858 under its own Sultanate.

John Rankine (colonial administrator)

Sir John RankineJohn Dalzell RankineJohn Rankine
Rankine served as Resident of Zanzibar from 1952 to 1954, an office his father, Richard Rankine, had previously held from 1929 to 1937.

Zanzibar

ZanzibariZanzibar, TanzaniaCommittee of Six
People have lived in Zanzibar for 20,000 years.

History

historical recordshistoricalhistoric
History properly starts when the islands became a base for traders voyaging between the African Great Lakes, the Arabian peninsula, and the Indian subcontinent.

African Great Lakes

Great LakesGreat Lakes regionGreat Lakes region of Africa
History properly starts when the islands became a base for traders voyaging between the African Great Lakes, the Arabian peninsula, and the Indian subcontinent.

Indian subcontinent

IndiasubcontinentIndian
History properly starts when the islands became a base for traders voyaging between the African Great Lakes, the Arabian peninsula, and the Indian subcontinent.

Unguja

Unguja IslandZanzibar IslandZanzibar
Unguja offered a protected and defensible harbor, so although the archipelago had few products of value, Omanis and Yemenis settled in what became Zanzibar City (Stone Town) as a convenient point from which to trade with towns on the Swahili Coast.

Yemen

Republic of YemenYemeniJemen
Unguja offered a protected and defensible harbor, so although the archipelago had few products of value, Omanis and Yemenis settled in what became Zanzibar City (Stone Town) as a convenient point from which to trade with towns on the Swahili Coast.

Zanzibar City

ZanzibarZanzibar TownKikwajuni
Unguja offered a protected and defensible harbor, so although the archipelago had few products of value, Omanis and Yemenis settled in what became Zanzibar City (Stone Town) as a convenient point from which to trade with towns on the Swahili Coast.

Swahili coast

Southeast AfricaSwahiliSwahili City States
Unguja offered a protected and defensible harbor, so although the archipelago had few products of value, Omanis and Yemenis settled in what became Zanzibar City (Stone Town) as a convenient point from which to trade with towns on the Swahili Coast.

Mosque

mosquesmasjidMasjids
They established garrisons on the islands and built the first mosques in the African Great Lakes.

Age of Discovery

Age of ExplorationAge of Discoveriesexplorer
During the Age of Exploration, the Portuguese Empire was the first European power to gain control of Zanzibar, and kept it for nearly 200 years.

Portuguese Empire

PortuguesePortugalPortuguese colonies
During the Age of Exploration, the Portuguese Empire was the first European power to gain control of Zanzibar, and kept it for nearly 200 years.

Oman

Sultanate of OmanOmaniOmani Empire
Unguja offered a protected and defensible harbor, so although the archipelago had few products of value, Omanis and Yemenis settled in what became Zanzibar City (Stone Town) as a convenient point from which to trade with towns on the Swahili Coast. In 1698, Zanzibar fell under the control of the Sultanate of Oman, which developed an economy of trade and cash crops, with a ruling Arab elite and a Bantu general population.

Cash crop

cash cropscommodity cropcash-crop
In 1698, Zanzibar fell under the control of the Sultanate of Oman, which developed an economy of trade and cash crops, with a ruling Arab elite and a Bantu general population.

Arabs

ArabArab peopleArabian
In 1698, Zanzibar fell under the control of the Sultanate of Oman, which developed an economy of trade and cash crops, with a ruling Arab elite and a Bantu general population.

Dutch Empire

DutchDutch coloniesDutch colony
Plantations were developed to grow spices; hence, the moniker of the Spice Islands (a name also used of Dutch colony the Moluccas, now part of Indonesia).

Maluku Islands

MoluccasMalukuSpice Islands
Plantations were developed to grow spices; hence, the moniker of the Spice Islands (a name also used of Dutch colony the Moluccas, now part of Indonesia).

Indonesia

Republic of IndonesiaIndonesianIndonesian Republic
Plantations were developed to grow spices; hence, the moniker of the Spice Islands (a name also used of Dutch colony the Moluccas, now part of Indonesia).

Ivory trade

ivoryivory tradingtrade in ivory
Another major trade good was ivory, the tusks of elephants that were killed on the Tanganyika mainland - a practice that is still in place to this day.

Tanganyika

Republic of TanganyikamainlandTanzania Mainland
Another major trade good was ivory, the tusks of elephants that were killed on the Tanganyika mainland - a practice that is still in place to this day.

Arab slave trade

slavesslave tradetrans-Saharan slave trade
The third pillar of the economy was slaves, which gave Zanzibar an important place in the Arab slave trade, the Indian Ocean equivalent of the better-known Triangular Trade.

Indian Ocean

IndianIndoSouthern Indian Ocean
The third pillar of the economy was slaves, which gave Zanzibar an important place in the Arab slave trade, the Indian Ocean equivalent of the better-known Triangular Trade.

Triangular trade

Triangle Tradetriangular slave tradeAtlantic triangular slave trade
The third pillar of the economy was slaves, which gave Zanzibar an important place in the Arab slave trade, the Indian Ocean equivalent of the better-known Triangular Trade.