History of film

film historianfilm historyhistory of cinemahistorianearly cinemacinemacinema historyfilmfilm historianshistory
Although the start of the history of film is not clearly defined, the commercial, public screening of ten of Lumière brothers' short films in Paris on 28 December 1895 can be regarded as the breakthrough of projected cinematographic motion pictures.wikipedia
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Kinetoscope

kinetographKinetophonepeephole viewing of motion picture devices
The Execution of Mary Stuart, produced by the Edison Company for viewing with the Kinetoscope, showed Mary Queen of Scots being executed in full view of the camera.
The Kinetoscope is an early motion picture exibition device.

D. W. Griffith

D.W. GriffithGriffithD.W. Grifter
In the 1900s, continuity of action across successive shots was achieved and the first close-up shot was introduced (some claim D. W. Griffith was the inventor).
Griffith is one of the founders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and among the most important figures in the history of film.

Vitascope

EdisonEdison Vitascopefilm projector
Porter, a projectionist, was hired by Thomas Edison to develop his new projection model known as the Vitascope.
The company realized that their Kinetoscope would soon be a thing of the past with the rapidly advancing proliferation of early cinematic engineering.

Film editing

film editoreditorediting
He used cross-cutting editing method to show simultaneous action in different places.
The history of film has included many women editors such as Dede Allen, Anne Bauchens, Margaret Booth, Barbara McLean, Anne V. Coates, Adrienne Fazan, Verna Fields, Blanche Sewell and Eda Warren.

Film

motion picturemoviecinema
Film as an art form has drawn on several earlier traditions in the fields such as (oral) storytelling, literature, theatre and visual arts.
Fields of academic study have been created that are derivative or dependent on the existence of film, such as film criticism, film history, divisions of film propaganda in authoritarian governments, or psychological on subliminal effects (e.g., of a flashing soda can during a screening).

Cinema of India

IndianIndian cinemaIndian film
The trend thrived best in India, where the influence of the country's traditional song-and-dance drama made the musical the basic form of most sound films (Cook, 1990); virtually unnoticed by the Western world for decades, this Indian popular cinema would nevertheless become the world's most prolific.
Ray is regarded as one of the greatest auteurs of 20th century cinema, with Dutt and Ghatak.

Hollywood

Hollywood, CaliforniaHollywood, CAHollywood, Los Angeles, California
The American film industry, or "Hollywood", as it was becoming known after its new geographical center in Hollywood, a neighborhood in Los Angeles, California, gained the position it has held, more or less, ever since: film factory for the world and exporting its product to most countries.
History of film

Visual arts

visual artistvisual artvisual
Film as an art form has drawn on several earlier traditions in the fields such as (oral) storytelling, literature, theatre and visual arts.
History of film

Silent film

silentsilent erasilent films
Roundhay Garden Scene is an 1888 short silent film recorded by French inventor Louis Le Prince.
Some lost films, such as the 1927 film London After Midnight have been the subject of considerable interest by film collectors and historians.

Phenakistiscope

phenakistoscopephénakisticopeearly moving picture
stroboscopic "persistence of vision" animation devices (phénakisticope since 1832, zoetrope since 1866, flip book since 1868)
History of film

Jean-Luc Godard

GodardGodardianJean Luc Godard
One of the most famous was The Apu Trilogy (1955–1959) from critically acclaimed Bengali film director Satyajit Ray, whose films had a profound influence on world cinema, with directors such as Akira Kurosawa, Martin Scorsese, James Ivory, Abbas Kiarostami, Elia Kazan, François Truffaut, Steven Spielberg, Carlos Saura, Jean-Luc Godard, Isao Takahata, Gregory Nava, Ira Sachs, Wes Anderson and Danny Boyle being influenced by his cinematic style.
Along with showing knowledge of film history through homages and references, several of his films expressed his political views; he was an avid reader of existential and Marxist philosophy.

Marx Brothers

The Marx BrothersMarx BrosMarx Brother
Dialogue now took precedence over "slapstick" in Hollywood comedies: the fast-paced, witty banter of The Front Page (1931) or It Happened One Night (1934), the sexual double entrendres of Mae West (She Done Him Wrong, 1933) or the often subversively anarchic nonsense talk of the Marx Brothers (Duck Soup, 1933).
The Marx Brothers' stage shows became popular just as motion pictures were evolving to "talkies".

Star Wars (film)

Star WarsA New HopeStar Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
The Hidden Fortress was also the inspiration behind George Lucas' Star Wars (1977).
Today, it is regarded as one of the most important films in the history of motion pictures.

Cinematography

cinematographercinematographiccinema
Although the start of the history of film is not clearly defined, the commercial, public screening of ten of Lumière brothers' short films in Paris on 28 December 1895 can be regarded as the breakthrough of projected cinematographic motion pictures.
History of cinema

Auguste and Louis Lumière

Lumière brothersLumièreLouis Lumière
Although the start of the history of film is not clearly defined, the commercial, public screening of ten of Lumière brothers' short films in Paris on 28 December 1895 can be regarded as the breakthrough of projected cinematographic motion pictures.
History of film

World cinema

foreign filmforeignforeign films
The 1950s was considered a "Golden Age" for non-English cinema.
History of film

Cinema of the United States

HollywoodAmericanUnited States
The American film industry, or "Hollywood", as it was becoming known after its new geographical center in Hollywood, a neighborhood in Los Angeles, California, gained the position it has held, more or less, ever since: film factory for the world and exporting its product to most countries.
History of film

Phantasmagoria

phantasmagoricphantasmagorical
Around 1790 this was developed into multi-media ghost shows known as phantasmagoria that could feature mechanical slides, rear projection, mobile projectors, superimposition, dissolves, live actors, smoke (sometimes to project images upon), odors, sounds and even electric shocks.
History of film

Come Along, Do!

Real film continuity, involving action moving from one sequence into another, is attributed to British film pioneer Robert W. Paul's Come Along, Do!, made in 1898 and one of the first films to feature more than one shot.
The film has cinematographic significance as the first example of film continuity.

Film industry

FilmMotion picturesmovie industry
In Britain, the Cinematograph Act 1909 was the first primary legislation to specifically regulate the film industry.
The period between the years 1927 (the effective end of the silent era) to 1948 is considered the age of the "Hollywood studio system", or, in a more common term, the Golden Age of Hollywood.

Peter Bogdanovich

Bogdanovich, Peter
It also, however, resulted in some failures, including Peter Bogdanovich's At Long Last Love and Michael Cimino's hugely expensive Western epic Heaven's Gate, which helped to bring about the demise of its backer, United Artists.
Peter Bogdanovich (born July 30, 1939) is an American director, writer, actor, producer, critic and film historian.

Cinema of Italy

ItalianItalian filmItaly
The great strength of the Italian industry was historical epics, with large casts and massive scenery.
History of cinema

Cinema of Germany

GermanGermanyWest German
The German film industry was seriously weakened by the war.
History of cinema

Raj Kapoor

RajRaj Kapoor’sRaj Kapoor Special Contribution Award
Many of the most critically acclaimed Asian films of all time were produced during this decade, including Yasujirō Ozu's Tokyo Story (1953), Satyajit Ray's The Apu Trilogy (1955–1959) and Jalsaghar (1958), Kenji Mizoguchi's Ugetsu (1954) and Sansho the Bailiff (1954), Raj Kapoor's Awaara (1951), Mikio Naruse's Floating Clouds (1955), Guru Dutt's Pyaasa (1957) and Kaagaz Ke Phool (1959), and the Akira Kurosawa films Rashomon (1950), Ikiru (1952), Seven Samurai (1954) and Throne of Blood (1957).
Film historians and movie buffs speak of him as the "Charlie Chaplin of Indian cinema," since he often portrayed a tramp-like figure, who, despite adversity, was still cheerful and honest.

The Story of Film: An Odyssey

Episode 1The Story of Film
The Story of Film: An Odyssey
The Story of Film: An Odyssey is a 2011 British documentary film about the history of film, presented on television in 15 one-hour chapters with a total length of over 900 minutes.