History of the New York Giants (baseball)

New York GiantsNew York GothamsGiantsNew YorkNew York (NL)New York Giants baseball teambaseball team of the same nameHistory of the New York GiantsNew York Gothams/GiantsNYG
The San Francisco Giants of Major League Baseball originated in New York City as the New York Gothams in 1883 and were known as the New York Giants from 1885 until the team relocated to San Francisco after the season.wikipedia
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San Francisco Giants

GiantsNew York GiantsSan Francisco
The San Francisco Giants of Major League Baseball originated in New York City as the New York Gothams in 1883 and were known as the New York Giants from 1885 until the team relocated to San Francisco after the season.
Founded in 1883 as the New York Gothams, and renamed three years later the New York Giants, the team eventually moved to San Francisco in 1958.

Relocation of professional sports teams

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The San Francisco Giants of Major League Baseball originated in New York City as the New York Gothams in 1883 and were known as the New York Giants from 1885 until the team relocated to San Francisco after the season.

Polo Grounds

Manhattan FieldThe Polo GroundsPolo Grounds I
During most of their 75 seasons in New York City, the Giants played home games at various incarnations of the Polo Grounds in Upper Manhattan.
In baseball, the original Polo Grounds was home to the New York Metropolitans from 1880 through 1885, and the New York Giants from 1883 through 1888.

Mel Ott

Mel Ott AwardMelvin OttOtt
Numerous inductees of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York played for the New York Giants, including John McGraw, Mel Ott, Bill Terry, Willie Mays, Monte Irvin, and Travis Jackson.
Melvin Thomas Ott (March 2, 1909 – November 21, 1958), nicknamed "Master Melvin", was an American professional baseball right fielder, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Giants, from through.

Bobby Thomson

Bobby Thomson Field
Famous moments in the Giants' New York history include the 1922 World Series, in which the Giants swept the Yankees in four games, Bobby Thomson's 1951 home run known as the "Shot Heard 'Round the World", and the defensive feat by Willie Mays during the first game of the 1954 World Series known as "the Catch".
He was an outfielder and right-handed batter for the New York Giants (1946–53, 1957), Milwaukee Braves (1954–57), Chicago Cubs (1958–59), Boston Red Sox (1960), and Baltimore Orioles (1960).

Travis Jackson

Numerous inductees of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York played for the New York Giants, including John McGraw, Mel Ott, Bill Terry, Willie Mays, Monte Irvin, and Travis Jackson.
In Major League Baseball (MLB), Jackson played for the New York Giants from 1922 through 1936, winning the 1933 World Series, and representing the Giants in the MLB All-Star in 1934.

Monte Irvin

Numerous inductees of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York played for the New York Giants, including John McGraw, Mel Ott, Bill Terry, Willie Mays, Monte Irvin, and Travis Jackson.
Monford Merrill "Monte" Irvin (February 25, 1919 – January 11, 2016) was an American left fielder and right fielder in the Negro leagues and Major League Baseball (MLB) who played with the Newark Eagles (1938–1942, 1946–1948), New York Giants (1949–1955) and Chicago Cubs (1956).

New York Yankees

YankeesNew York HighlandersNew York Yankee
The Giants had intense rivalries with their fellow New York teams the New York Yankees and the Brooklyn Dodgers, facing the Yankees in six World Series and playing the league rival Dodgers multiple times per season.
Plans to add a team in New York City were blocked by the NL's New York Giants.

New York Giants

GiantsN.Y. GiantsNY Giants
The New York Giants of the National Football League are named after the team.
To distinguish themselves from the professional baseball team of the same name, the football team was incorporated as the "New York National League Football Company, Inc."

Subway Series

cross-town rivalAll New Yorkcrosstown rival
Games between any two of these three teams were known collectively as the Subway Series.
Although organized games between all-stars from New York teams against all-stars from Brooklyn teams date back to the 1850s, the first actual New York-Brooklyn "World Championship Series" occurred in 1889, a full nine years before Brooklyn was incorporated into the City of New York by the Greater New York Act of 1898, when the New York Giants squared off against (and defeated) the Brooklyn Bridegrooms, also called the "Trolley Dodgers", of the American Association.

Bill Terry

Numerous inductees of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York played for the New York Giants, including John McGraw, Mel Ott, Bill Terry, Willie Mays, Monte Irvin, and Travis Jackson.
This gained the notice of the major league New York Giants, and on September 18 they purchased his contract from the Mud Hens.

1883 New York Gothams season

1883
The Gothams, as the Giants were originally known, entered the National League seven years after its 1876 formation, in 1883, while their other club, the Metropolitans played in the rival American Association (1882-1891).
The 1883 New York Gothams season was the franchise's first season.

Shot Heard 'Round the World (baseball)

Shot Heard 'Round the WorldThe Shot Heard 'Round the Worldnow-legendary home run
Famous moments in the Giants' New York history include the 1922 World Series, in which the Giants swept the Yankees in four games, Bobby Thomson's 1951 home run known as the "Shot Heard 'Round the World", and the defensive feat by Willie Mays during the first game of the 1954 World Series known as "the Catch".
The principal National League (NL) contenders in 1951 were the New York Giants, Brooklyn Dodgers, and Philadelphia Phillies.

1888 New York Giants season

New York Giants1888Giants
The team won its first National League pennant in 1888, as well as a victory over the St. Louis Browns in an early incarnation of the pre-modern-era World Series.
The 1888 New York Giants season was the franchise's 6th season.

Jim Mutrie

James Mutrie
The Giants began as the second baseball club founded by millionaire tobacconist John B. Day and veteran amateur baseball player Jim Mutrie.
James J. Mutrie (June 13, 1851 – January 24, 1938) was an American baseball pioneer who was the co-founder and first manager of both the original New York Metropolitans and the New York Giants.

History of the Brooklyn Dodgers

Brooklyn DodgersBrooklyn RobinsBrooklyn Superbas
The Giants had intense rivalries with their fellow New York teams the New York Yankees and the Brooklyn Dodgers, facing the Yankees in six World Series and playing the league rival Dodgers multiple times per season.
They lost the 1889 championship tournament to the New York Giants and tied the 1890 championship with the Louisville Colonels.

1888 World Series

World Series18886-4
The team won its first National League pennant in 1888, as well as a victory over the St. Louis Browns in an early incarnation of the pre-modern-era World Series.
The 1888 World Series was an end-of-the-year professional baseball season championship playoff series between the National League champion New York Giants and the old American Association champion St. Louis Browns.

1889 New York Giants season

New York Giants18891889 New York Giants
They repeated as champions the next year with a pennant and world championship victory over the Brooklyn Bridegrooms.
The 1889 New York Giants season was the franchise's 7th season.

Philadelphia Phillies

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It is said that after one particularly satisfying victory over the Philadelphia Phillies, Mutrie (who was also the team's manager) stormed into the dressing room and exclaimed, "My big fellows! My giants!"
The Phillies finished the 1917 season in second place with a record of 87-65, ten games behind the New York Giants (baseball team).

National League

NLNationalNational League of Professional Baseball Clubs
The Gothams, as the Giants were originally known, entered the National League seven years after its 1876 formation, in 1883, while their other club, the Metropolitans played in the rival American Association (1882-1891).
In 1883, the New York Gothams and Philadelphia Phillies began National League play.

Andrew Freedman

Andrew Freedman Home
Four years later, Talcott sold the Giants to Andrew Freedman, a real estate developer with ties to the Tammany Hall, the political machine of the Democratic Party that ran New York City.
Freedman was the owner of the New York Giants of the National League from 1895 through 1902.

Major League Baseball

MLBMajor LeagueMajor Leagues
The San Francisco Giants of Major League Baseball originated in New York City as the New York Gothams in 1883 and were known as the New York Giants from 1885 until the team relocated to San Francisco after the season.
O'Malley was also influential in persuading the rival New York Giants to move west to become the San Francisco Giants.

John McGraw

McGrawJohn J. McGrawJohn "Mugsy" McGraw
Numerous inductees of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York played for the New York Giants, including John McGraw, Mel Ott, Bill Terry, Willie Mays, Monte Irvin, and Travis Jackson.
John Joseph McGraw (April 7, 1873 – February 25, 1934), nicknamed "Little Napoleon" and "Mugsy", was a Major League Baseball (MLB) player and manager of the New York Giants.

John T. Brush

John Brush
Hiring "Mr. McGraw," as his players referred to him, was one of Freedman's last significant moves as owner of the Giants, since after that 1902 season he was forced to sell his interest in the club to John T. Brush.
John Tomlinson Brush (June 15, 1845 – November 26, 1912) was an American sports executive who is primarily remembered as the owner of the New York Giants Major League Baseball franchise from 1890 until his death.

Amos Rusie

Freedman was one of the most detested owners in baseball history, getting into heated disputes with other owners, writers and his own players, most famously with star pitcher Amos Rusie, author of the first Giants no-hitter.
He had a 10-season career in the National League (NL), which consisted of one season with the Indianapolis Hoosiers in, eight with the New York Giants from to, and one with the Cincinnati Reds in.