History of the St. Louis Browns

St. Louis BrownsSt Louis BrownsBrownsSaint Louis BrownsSt. LouisSLBSt. Louis (AL)Los Angeles RamsMilwaukee BrewersSt Louis
The St. Louis Browns were a Major League Baseball team that originated in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, as the Milwaukee Brewers.wikipedia
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1953 St. Louis Browns season

1953St. Louis Browns1953 season
After the 1953 season, the team relocated to Baltimore, Maryland, where it became the Baltimore Orioles.
The 1953 St. Louis Browns season was a season in American baseball.

Baltimore Orioles

OriolesBaltimoreSt. Louis Browns
After the 1953 season, the team relocated to Baltimore, Maryland, where it became the Baltimore Orioles.
As one of the American League's eight charter teams in 1901, this particular franchise spent its first year as a major league club in Milwaukee, Wisconsin as the Milwaukee Brewers before moving to St. Louis, Missouri to become the St. Louis Browns in 1902.

Sportsman's Park

Busch StadiumBusch Stadium ISportsman's Park/Busch Stadium I
Hedges built a new park, known as Sportsman's Park, on the site of the old Browns' former venue.
From 1920–1953, Sportsman's Park was the home field of both the St. Louis Browns of the American League, and the St. Louis Cardinals of the National League, after which the Browns departed to become the modern-day Baltimore Orioles.

1953 in baseball

1953531953 season
*May 6 – At Sportsman's Park, Bobo Holloman of the St. Louis Browns no-hits the Philadelphia Athletics, 6–0, in his very first Major League start.

St. Louis Cardinals

St. Louis BrownsCardinalsSt. Louis
This referred to the original name of the 1880s club that by 1900 was known as the St. Louis Cardinals.
(Two years later, an unrelated St. Louis Browns team joined the American League.)

Bill DeWitt

Bill DeWitt Sr.William DeWitt Sr.
His son-in-law, Bill DeWitt, was the team's general manager.
One of his first jobs, in 1916, was selling soda pop at the St. Louis Browns' home field, Sportsman's Park.

1910 Chalmers Award

Chalmers Award1910 race for best average in the American LeagueAmerican League batting title
During this time, the Browns were best known for their role in the race for the 1910 American League batting title.
The 1910 Chalmers Award scandal was an incident in which a Major League Baseball team, the St. Louis Browns, tried but failed to give Nap Lajoie the batting title over Ty Cobb.

Branch Rickey

Rickey, Branch
Shortly after buying the team, he fired general manager Branch Rickey, who was promptly hired by the Cardinals.
Rickey played in MLB for the St. Louis Browns and New York Highlanders from 1905 through 1907.

Robert Hedges (baseball)

Robert Hedges
In 1902, he found a suitable St. Louis-based owner in carriage maker Robert Hedges.
Robert Hedges (born 1869 in Jackson County, Missouri – died April 1932 in St. Louis, Missouri) was the owner of the St. Louis Browns of the American League from through.

Red Corriden

O'Connor ordered rookie third baseman Red Corriden to play on the outfield grass.
A shortstop and third baseman in his playing days, Corriden appeared in 223 big league games with the St. Louis Browns (1910), Detroit Tigers (1912) and Chicago Cubs (1913–15), batting .205 with 131 hits.

1922 St. Louis Browns season

St. Louis Browns19221922 Browns
The 1922 Browns excited their owner by almost beating the Yankees to a pennant.
The 1922 St. Louis Browns season was a season in American baseball.

Bill Veeck

Mike VeeckBill Veeck, Jr.Bill V. Veck
In 1951, Bill Veeck, the colorful former owner of the Cleveland Indians, purchased the Browns from DeWitt.
Although Veeck had become extremely popular, an attempt in 1947 to trade Boudreau to the St. Louis Browns led to mass protests and petitions supporting Boudreau.

George Sisler

George(George) SislerGeorge Harold Sisler
The club was boasting the best players in franchise history, including future Hall of Famer George Sisler and an outfield trio of Ken Williams, Baby Doll Jacobson, and Jack Tobin, who batted .300 or better from 1919 to 1923 and in 1925.
He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the St. Louis Browns, Washington Senators and Boston Braves.

Ken Williams (baseball)

Ken WilliamsKen R. Williams Ken R. Williams
The club was boasting the best players in franchise history, including future Hall of Famer George Sisler and an outfield trio of Ken Williams, Baby Doll Jacobson, and Jack Tobin, who batted .300 or better from 1919 to 1923 and in 1925.
Williams began his major league career with the Cincinnati Reds before spending the majority of his playing days with the St. Louis Browns, and ended his career playing for the Boston Red Sox.

Baby Doll Jacobson

The club was boasting the best players in franchise history, including future Hall of Famer George Sisler and an outfield trio of Ken Williams, Baby Doll Jacobson, and Jack Tobin, who batted .300 or better from 1919 to 1923 and in 1925.
He played 11 seasons of Major League Baseball, principally with the St. Louis Browns, between 1915 and 1927.

American League

ALAmericanAmerican League (AL)
Charter member of the American League (AL), the Brewers moved to St. Louis, Missouri, after the 1901 season, where they played for 52 years as the St. Louis Browns.
the next year the original Milwaukee Brewers moved to St. Louis to become the St. Louis Browns.

St. Louis Terriers

St. LouisSt. Louis FederalsSt. Louis Terriers (FL)
In 1916, Hedges sold the Browns to Philip DeCatesby Ball, who owned the St. Louis Terriers in the by-then-defunct Federal League.
The team was owned by ice magnate Phil Ball, who later was owner of the St. Louis Browns.

Barney Pelty

Barney "the Yiddish Curver" Pelty
Pitcher Barney Pelty was a workhorse for the Browns, and a member of their starting rotation from 1904, when he pitched 31 complete games and 301 innings, through 1911.
The Boston Red Sox and the St. Louis Browns got into a bidding war for him in 1903, and the Browns won with an offer of $850 ($0 today).

Donald Lee Barnes

His estate ran the team for three years until Rickey helped broker a sale to investment banker Donald Lee Barnes.
Donald Lee Barnes (May 8, 1894 – July 20, 1962 in St. Louis, Missouri) was the owner of the St. Louis Browns of the American League from through when the team was sold to Richard Muckerman in 1945.

St. Louis

St. Louis, MissouriSt. Louis, MOSaint Louis, Missouri
Charter member of the American League (AL), the Brewers moved to St. Louis, Missouri, after the 1901 season, where they played for 52 years as the St. Louis Browns.
Previously, the St. Louis Browns played in the American League (AL) from 1902 to 1953, before moving to Baltimore, Maryland to become the current incarnation of the Orioles.

Richard Muckerman

Richard C. Muckerman
After the Series, Barnes sold the Browns to businessman Richard Muckerman.
He was the owner of the St. Louis Browns of the American League from through.

1909 Major League Baseball season

1909the following season
In 1909, the Browns rebuilt Sportsman's Park as the third concrete-and-steel park in the major leagues.

1910 Major League Baseball season

19101910 season1910 National League pennant
During this time, the Browns were best known for their role in the race for the 1910 American League batting title.