History of the United States (1776–1789)

History of the United States (1776–89)United Statesindependence17501776 to 17891776-17891776–1789Americancolonial AmericaConfederation
Between 1776 and 1789 thirteen British colonies emerged as a new independent nation that would be eventually known as The United States of America.wikipedia
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Lexington, Massachusetts

LexingtonLexington, MACambridge Farms Parish
At Lexington, Massachusetts, shots broke out with the Lexington militia, leaving eight colonists dead.

Second Continental Congress

Continental CongressCongressSecond
The Second Continental Congress issued the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776, formally launching the American Revolutionary War, the fighting of which had already started between colonial militias and the British Army in 1775.

Thirteen Colonies

American coloniescoloniescolonial
Between 1776 and 1789 thirteen British colonies emerged as a new independent nation that would be eventually known as The United States of America.

Articles of Confederation

Articles of Confederation and Perpetual UnionConfederationArticles
In 1789, Federalists replaced the Articles of Confederation, passed in 1777 as the original governing agreement between the newly independent states, with the Constitution of the United States of America, which with amendments remains the fundamental governing law of the United States today.

Treaty of Paris (1783)

Treaty of Paris1783 Treaty of ParisTreaty of Paris of 1783
Long negotiations resulted in the Treaty of Paris (1783), which provided highly favorable boundaries for the United States; it included nearly all land east of the Mississippi River and south of Canada, except British West Florida, which was awarded to Spain.

Congress of the Confederation

Confederation CongressCongressContinental Congress
The Constitution itself called for ratification by state conventions specially elected for the purpose, and the Confederation Congress recommended the Constitution to the states, asking that ratification conventions be called.

United States Declaration of Independence

Declaration of IndependenceAmerican Declaration of IndependenceU.S. Declaration of Independence
The Second Continental Congress issued the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776, formally launching the American Revolutionary War, the fighting of which had already started between colonial militias and the British Army in 1775.

American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary WarAmerican War of IndependenceAmerican Revolution
The Second Continental Congress issued the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776, formally launching the American Revolutionary War, the fighting of which had already started between colonial militias and the British Army in 1775.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonGeneral George Washington
Under the leadership of General George Washington, the Continental Army and Navy defeated the British military securing the independence of the thirteen colonies.

Continental Army

ContinentalContinental soldiersContinentals
Under the leadership of General George Washington, the Continental Army and Navy defeated the British military securing the independence of the thirteen colonies.

Continental Navy

NavyContinental13 frigates
Under the leadership of General George Washington, the Continental Army and Navy defeated the British military securing the independence of the thirteen colonies.

Republicanism in the United States

republicanismRepublicanAmerican republicanism
This new ideology was a decidedly republican political viewpoint, which rejected royalty, aristocracy, and corruption and called for sovereignty of the people and emphasized civic duty.

French and Indian War

French & Indian WarFrench and IndianSeven Years' War
In 1763 with British victory in the French and Indian War, this period of isolation came to an end with the Stamp Act of 1765.

Stamp Act 1765

Stamp ActStamp Act of 17651765 Stamp Act
In 1763 with British victory in the French and Indian War, this period of isolation came to an end with the Stamp Act of 1765.

First Continental Congress

FirstContinental Congress1st Continental Congress
They called the First Continental Congress in 1774 to inaugurate a trade boycott against Britain.

Boston Tea Party

The Boston Tea PartyTea Partytea was thrown into the harbor
When resistance in Boston culminated in the Boston Tea Party in 1773 with the dumping of taxed tea shipments into the harbor, London imposed the Intolerable Acts on the colony of Massachusetts, ended self-government, and sent in the Army to take control.

Intolerable Acts

Coercive Actsactsamong other actions
When resistance in Boston culminated in the Boston Tea Party in 1773 with the dumping of taxed tea shipments into the harbor, London imposed the Intolerable Acts on the colony of Massachusetts, ended self-government, and sent in the Army to take control.

Culper Ring

Culper Spy RingGeorge Washington Spy Ringgroup
In 1778, he formed the Culper Ring to spy on the British movements in New York City.

Benedict Arnold

ArnoldBenedictGen. Benedict Arnold
In 1780 it discovered Benedict Arnold was a traitor.

John Sullivan (general)

John SullivanGeneral John SullivanSullivan
The results of his general staff were mixed, as some of his favorites never mastered the art of command, such as John Sullivan.

Nathanael Greene

Nathaniel GreeneGreeneGeneral Nathanael Greene
Eventually, he found capable officers such as Nathanael Greene, Daniel Morgan, Henry Knox (chief of artillery), and Alexander Hamilton (chief of staff).

Daniel Morgan

Gen. Daniel Morgan
Eventually, he found capable officers such as Nathanael Greene, Daniel Morgan, Henry Knox (chief of artillery), and Alexander Hamilton (chief of staff).

Henry Knox

General KnoxKnoxGeneral Henry Knox
Eventually, he found capable officers such as Nathanael Greene, Daniel Morgan, Henry Knox (chief of artillery), and Alexander Hamilton (chief of staff).

Alexander Hamilton

HamiltonHamiltonianA. Hamilton
Eventually, he found capable officers such as Nathanael Greene, Daniel Morgan, Henry Knox (chief of artillery), and Alexander Hamilton (chief of staff).

Siege of Yorktown

YorktownBattle of Yorktownsurrender at Yorktown
The great successes at Boston (1776), Saratoga (1777), and Yorktown (1781) came from trapping the British far from base with much larger numbers of troops.