History of the United States Democratic Party

Democratic PartyDemocraticDemocratDemocratsHistory of the Democratic Party (United States)HistDemocratHistory of the Democratic Partymodern Democratic Party Democrats Democrat
The Democratic Party is the oldest voter-based political party in the world and the oldest existing political party in the United States, tracing its heritage back to the anti-Federalists and the Jeffersonian Democratic-Republican Party of the 1790s.wikipedia
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Andrew Jackson

JacksonJacksonianPresident Andrew Jackson
During the Second Party System (from 1832 to the mid-1850s) under Presidents Andrew Jackson, Martin Van Buren and James K. Polk, the Democrats usually bested the opposition Whig Party by narrow margins.
In reaction to the alleged "corrupt bargain" between Adams and Henry Clay and the ambitious agenda of President Adams, Jackson's supporters founded the Democratic Party.

Democratic-Republican Party

Democratic-RepublicanDemocratic-RepublicansRepublican
The Democratic Party is the oldest voter-based political party in the world and the oldest existing political party in the United States, tracing its heritage back to the anti-Federalists and the Jeffersonian Democratic-Republican Party of the 1790s.
One faction of the Democratic-Republicans eventually coalesced into the modern Democratic Party, while the other faction ultimately formed the core of the Whig Party.

William Jennings Bryan

BryanWilliam J. Bryanpolitician
The agrarian element, marching behind the slogan of free silver (i.e. in favor of inflation), captured the party in 1896 and nominated William Jennings Bryan in the 1896, 1900 and 1908 presidential elections, although he lost every time.
Beginning in 1896, he emerged as a dominant force in the Democratic Party, standing three times as the party's nominee for President of the United States in the 1896, 1900, and 1908 elections.

History of the United States Republican Party

Republican PartyRepublicanRepublicans
From 1860 to 1932 in the era of the American Civil War to the Great Depression, the opposing Republican Party, organized in the mid-1850s from the ruins of the Whig Party and some other smaller splinter groups, was dominant in presidential politics.
At its inception, Republican Party had almost no presence in the Southern United States; by 1858, however it had enlisted former Whigs and former Free Soil Democrats to form majorities in nearly every Northern state.

Political party

political partiespartyparties
The Democratic Party is the oldest voter-based political party in the world and the oldest existing political party in the United States, tracing its heritage back to the anti-Federalists and the Jeffersonian Democratic-Republican Party of the 1790s.
The transformation from loose factions into organised modern political parties is considered to have first occurred in either the United Kingdom or the United States, with the United Kingdom's Conservative Party and the Democratic Party of the United States both frequently called the world's first modern political party.

Second Party System

eraera in American politicspartisan politics
During the Second Party System (from 1832 to the mid-1850s) under Presidents Andrew Jackson, Martin Van Buren and James K. Polk, the Democrats usually bested the opposition Whig Party by narrow margins. The spirit of Jacksonian democracy animated the party from the early 1830s to the 1850s, shaping the Second Party System, with the Whig Party as the main opposition.
Two major parties dominated the political landscape: the Democratic Party, led by Andrew Jackson, and the Whig Party, assembled by Henry Clay from the National Republicans and from other opponents of Jackson.

Adlai Stevenson II

Adlai StevensonAdlai E. StevensonStevenson
A new Republican Party President was only elected later in the following decade of the early 1950s with the losses by two-time nominee, the Governor of Illinois Adlai Stevenson (grandson of the former Vice President with the same name of the 1890s) to the very popular war hero and commanding general in World War II, General Dwight D. Eisenhower (in 1952 and 1956).
A member of the Democratic Party, Stevenson served in numerous positions in the federal government during the 1930s and 1940s, including the Agricultural Adjustment Administration (AAA), Federal Alcohol Administration, Department of the Navy, and the State Department.

Republican Party (United States)

RepublicanRepublican PartyR
A new Republican Party President was only elected later in the following decade of the early 1950s with the losses by two-time nominee, the Governor of Illinois Adlai Stevenson (grandson of the former Vice President with the same name of the 1890s) to the very popular war hero and commanding general in World War II, General Dwight D. Eisenhower (in 1952 and 1956).
Founded in the Northern states in 1854 by abolitionists, ex-Whigs, and ex-Free Soilers, the Republican Party quickly became the principal opposition to the dominant Democratic Party and the briefly popular Know Nothing Party.

Fifth Party System

Fifth
Starting with 32nd President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1932 during the Great Depression, the party dominated the Fifth Party System, with its progressive liberal policies and programs with the New Deal coalition to combat the emergency bank closings and the continuing financial depression since the famous Wall Street Crash of 1929 and later going into the crises leading up to World War II.
This era of Democratic Party dominance emerged from the realignment of the voting blocs and interest groups supporting the Democratic Party into the New Deal coalition following the Great Depression.

Manifest destiny

Western expansionwestward expansionAmerican expansion
Democrats strongly supported Manifest Destiny and most Whigs strongly opposed it.
Historians have emphasized that "manifest destiny" was a contested concept—Democrats endorsed the idea but many prominent Americans (such as Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant, and most Whigs) rejected it.

Jacksonian democracy

JacksonianJacksonian DemocratJacksonian Democrats
The spirit of Jacksonian democracy animated the party from the early 1830s to the 1850s, shaping the Second Party System, with the Whig Party as the main opposition.
Jackson's supporters began to form the modern Democratic Party.

United States House of Representatives

U.S. RepresentativeU.S. House of RepresentativesUnited States Representative
Over the same period, the Democrats proved more competitive with the Republicans in Congressional politics, enjoying House of Representatives majorities (as in the 65th Congress) in 15 of the 36 Congresses elected, although only in five of these did they form the majority in the Senate.
The Democratic Party and Republican Party each held majorities in the House at various times.

Jeffersonian democracy

JeffersonianJeffersoniansJeffersonian Democrat
As Mary Beth Norton explains: The Democrats represented a wide range of views but shared a fundamental commitment to the Jeffersonian concept of an agrarian society.
Jeffersonian democracy persisted as an element of the Democratic Party into the early 20th century, as exemplified by the rise of Jacksonian democracy and the three presidential candidacies of William Jennings Bryan.

Missouri

MOState of MissouriMissouri, USA
Important Democratic progressive/liberal leaders included 33rd and 36th Presidents Harry S. Truman of Missouri (1945–1953) and Lyndon B. Johnson of Texas (1963–1969), respectively; and the earlier Kennedy brothers of 35th President John F. Kennedy of Massachusetts (1961–1963), Senators Robert F. Kennedy of New York and Senator Ted Kennedy of Massachusetts who carried the flag for modern American liberalism.
Folk was elected governor as a progressive reformer and Democrat in the 1904 election.

1952 United States presidential election

19521952 presidential election1952 election
A new Republican Party President was only elected later in the following decade of the early 1950s with the losses by two-time nominee, the Governor of Illinois Adlai Stevenson (grandson of the former Vice President with the same name of the 1890s) to the very popular war hero and commanding general in World War II, General Dwight D. Eisenhower (in 1952 and 1956).
The expected candidate for the Democratic nomination was incumbent President Harry S. Truman.

War Democrat

War DemocratsUnion Dem.anti-secession Democrats
During the Civil War, Northern Democrats divided into two factions: the War Democrats, who supported the military policies of President Lincoln; and the Copperheads, who strongly opposed them.
War Democrats in American politics of the 1860s were members of the [[History of the United States Democratic Party#Civil War, Reconstruction, and the Gilded Age: 1854–1896|Democratic Party]] who supported the Union and rejected the policies of the Copperheads (or Peace Democrats).

Copperhead (politics)

CopperheadsCopperheadPeace Democrats
During the Civil War, Northern Democrats divided into two factions: the War Democrats, who supported the military policies of President Lincoln; and the Copperheads, who strongly opposed them.
In the 1860s, the Copperheads, also known as Peace Democrats, were a faction of Democrats in the Union who opposed the American Civil War and wanted an immediate peace settlement with the Confederates.

Union (American Civil War)

UnionUnionistNorth
During the Civil War, Northern Democrats divided into two factions: the War Democrats, who supported the military policies of President Lincoln; and the Copperheads, who strongly opposed them.
The Democratic Party strongly supported the war at the beginning in 1861, but by 1862, was split between the War Democrats and the anti-war element known as Peace Democrats, led by the extremist "Copperheads".

August Belmont

August Belmont Sr.August Belmont, Sr.August Belmont & Co.
Led by Stephen A. Douglas, James K. Polk, Franklin Pierce and New York financier August Belmont, this faction explains, broke with the agrarian and strict constructionist orthodoxies of the past and embraced commerce, technology, regulation, reform and internationalism.
He arrived in the previously prospering United States during the first waves of the financial/economic recession of the Panic of 1837, shortly after the end of the iconic two-term administration of President Andrew Jackson, the nation's first Democratic administration.

Radical Republicans

Radical RepublicanRadicalRadicals
In the 1866 elections, the Radical Republicans won two-thirds majorities in Congress and took control of national affairs.
They were opposed during the War by the moderate Republicans (led by United States President Abraham Lincoln), and by the pro-slavery and anti-Reconstruction Democratic Party as well as liberals in the North during Reconstruction.

New Departure (United States)

New DepartureNew Departure (Democrats)New Departure Democrats
Realizing that the old issues were holding it back, the Democrats tried a "New Departure" that downplayed the War and stressed such issues as corruption and white supremacy, the latter of which it wholeheartedly supported.
The New Departure refers to the political strategy used by the Democratic Party in the United States after 1865 to distance itself from its pro-slavery and Copperhead history in an effort to broaden its political base, and focus on issues where it had more of an advantage, especially economic issues.

Modern liberalism in the United States

liberalliberalsLiberalism
Important Democratic progressive/liberal leaders included 33rd and 36th Presidents Harry S. Truman of Missouri (1945–1953) and Lyndon B. Johnson of Texas (1963–1969), respectively; and the earlier Kennedy brothers of 35th President John F. Kennedy of Massachusetts (1961–1963), Senators Robert F. Kennedy of New York and Senator Ted Kennedy of Massachusetts who carried the flag for modern American liberalism.
The Democratic Party included the Northern and Western liberals on one hand and the generally conservative Southern whites on the other.

Ulysses S. Grant

Ulysses GrantGrantPresident Grant
Many former Democrats became Republicans, especially soldiers such as generals Ulysses S. Grant and John A. Logan.
The Liberal Republicans and Democrats united behind Grant's opponent in the presidential election of 1872, but Grant was handily re-elected.

Rutherford B. Hayes

HayesRutherford HayesPresident Hayes
The Compromise of 1877 put Republican Rutherford B. Hayes in the White House in exchange for removing federal troops that were propping up the three remaining Republican governments in the South.
He lost the popular vote to Democrat Samuel J. Tilden, but he won an intensely disputed electoral-college vote after a Congressional commission awarded him twenty contested electoral votes.

Doughface

apparent sympathiesDoughfacesnorthern man with southern feelings
Buchanan, a Northern "Doughface" (his base of support was in the pro-slavery South), split the party on the issue of slavery in Kansas when he attempted to pass a federal slave code as demanded by the South.
Typically it was applied to a Northern Democrat who was more often allied with the Southern Democrats than with the majority of Northern Democrats.