Hoklo people

HokkienHokloHokkiensHokkien peopleMinnanHoklosMinnan peopleHokkien ChineseHoklo TaiwaneseFukiens
The Hoklo people or Hokkien people are Han Chinese people whose traditional ancestral homes are in southern Fujian, China and speakers of Hokkien which is the prestige dialect of the Southern Min varieties.wikipedia
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Han Chinese

HanChineseHan people
The Hoklo people or Hokkien people are Han Chinese people whose traditional ancestral homes are in southern Fujian, China and speakers of Hokkien which is the prestige dialect of the Southern Min varieties.
Hoklo immigrants from Quanzhou settled in coastal regions, and those from Zhangzhou tended to gather on inland plains, while the Hakka inhabited hilly areas.

Hokkien

Hokkien ChineseHokkien languageHokkien dialect
The Hoklo people or Hokkien people are Han Chinese people whose traditional ancestral homes are in southern Fujian, China and speakers of Hokkien which is the prestige dialect of the Southern Min varieties. "Hoklo people" of this page refers to people whose native language is the Quanzhang Minnan (Hokkien-Taiwanese) spoken in Southern Fujian (China's province), Taiwan, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, the Philippines and by many overseas Chinese throughout Southeast Asia.
Many ethnic Han Chinese emigrants to the region were Hoklo from southern Fujian, and brought the language to what is now Burma (Myanmar), Indonesia (the former Dutch East Indies) and present day Malaysia and Singapore (formerly Malaya and the British Straits Settlements).

Fujian

Fujian ProvinceFukienHokkien
The Hoklo people or Hokkien people are Han Chinese people whose traditional ancestral homes are in southern Fujian, China and speakers of Hokkien which is the prestige dialect of the Southern Min varieties.
Today, most Taiwanese are descendants of Hokkien people from Southern Fujian.

Southern Min

Min NanHokkienMinnan
The Hoklo people or Hokkien people are Han Chinese people whose traditional ancestral homes are in southern Fujian, China and speakers of Hokkien which is the prestige dialect of the Southern Min varieties.
The Southern Min dialects spoken in Taiwan, collectively known as Taiwanese, is a first language for most of the Hoklo people, the main ethnicity of Taiwan.

Chen Jiongming

Ch'en Chiung-MingChen Chiung-mingChen Jiong Ming
There have been many famous Hoklo people throughout history, notably Koxinga, Su Song, Chen Boda, Howqua, Wee Cho Yaw, Lee Kong Chian, Momofuku Ando, Yuan T. Lee, Sergio Osmeña, Chuan Leekpai, Corazon Aquino and Chen Jiongming.
Ch’en Chiung-ming, later written as Chen Jiongming, (18 January 1878 – 22 September 1933), was a Hailufeng Hokkien revolutionary figure in the early period of the Republic of China.

Chuan Leekpai

ChuanChuan Likphai
There have been many famous Hoklo people throughout history, notably Koxinga, Su Song, Chen Boda, Howqua, Wee Cho Yaw, Lee Kong Chian, Momofuku Ando, Yuan T. Lee, Sergio Osmeña, Chuan Leekpai, Corazon Aquino and Chen Jiongming.
Chuan is ethnic Hokkien, coming from a third-generation Thai Chinese family.

Minnan region

Southern FujianMin-nanMinnan
"Hoklo people" of this page refers to people whose native language is the Quanzhang Minnan (Hokkien-Taiwanese) spoken in Southern Fujian (China's province), Taiwan, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, the Philippines and by many overseas Chinese throughout Southeast Asia.
It is the native homeland of the Hokkien people who speak the Hokkien language or Minnan language, a variety of Southern Min.

Yuan T. Lee

Yuan Tseh LeeLee Yuan-tsehY. T. Lee
There have been many famous Hoklo people throughout history, notably Koxinga, Su Song, Chen Boda, Howqua, Wee Cho Yaw, Lee Kong Chian, Momofuku Ando, Yuan T. Lee, Sergio Osmeña, Chuan Leekpai, Corazon Aquino and Chen Jiongming.
Lee was born to a Hokkien family in Shinchiku City (modern-day Hsinchu city) in northern Taiwan, which was then under Japanese rule, to Lee Tze-fan, an artist, and Ts'ai P'ei, an elementary school teacher from Goseikō Town, Taichū Prefecture (Wuqi, Taichung).

Taiwanese Hokkien

TaiwaneseHokkienTaiwanese Minnan
Despite the many ways to write Hoklo in Chinese, the term Holo is used in Taiwan to refer to the ethnicity and language (Taiwanese Hokkien).
It is spoken by the Taiwanese Hoklo people, who descended from immigrants from southern Fujian during the Qing dynasty.

Su Song

Su SungEndless power-transmitting chain driveSong, Su
There have been many famous Hoklo people throughout history, notably Koxinga, Su Song, Chen Boda, Howqua, Wee Cho Yaw, Lee Kong Chian, Momofuku Ando, Yuan T. Lee, Sergio Osmeña, Chuan Leekpai, Corazon Aquino and Chen Jiongming.
Su Song was of Hokkien ancestry who was born in modern-day Fujian, near medieval Quanzhou.

Taiwanese people

Taiwanesepeople of TaiwanTaiwan
About 70% of the Taiwanese people descend from Hoklo immigrants who arrived to the island prior to the start of Japanese rule in 1895.
The category of Han Chinese consists of the three main groups: Hoklo, Hakka, and mainland Chinese.

Taiwan

Republic of ChinaFormosaRepublic of China (Taiwan)
"Hoklo people" of this page refers to people whose native language is the Quanzhang Minnan (Hokkien-Taiwanese) spoken in Southern Fujian (China's province), Taiwan, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, the Philippines and by many overseas Chinese throughout Southeast Asia.
Alternatively, the ethnic groups of Taiwan may be roughly divided among the Hoklo (70%), the Hakka (14%), the Waishengren (14%), and indigenous peoples (2%).

Teochew dialect

TeochewChaozhouTeochew language
In Hakka, Teochew, and Cantonese, Hoklo may be written as Hoglo and 學佬.
In Singapore, Teochew remains the ancestral language of many Chinese Singaporeans, with the Teochews making up second largest Chinese group in Singapore, after the Hokkiens.

Hoklo Taiwanese

HokloHokkiens from TaiwanTaiwan
After the 1960s, many Hokkiens from Taiwan began immigrating to the United States and Canada.
Hoklo Taiwanese are a major ethnic group in Taiwan whose ancestry is wholly or partially Hoklo.

Chinese Singaporeans

ChineseChinese SingaporeanSingaporean Chinese
They consist of "persons of Chinese origin" such as the Hokkiens, Teochews, Hainanese, Cantonese, Hakka, Hokchias and Foochows, Henghuas, Shanghainese, Northern Chinese, etc."

Xiamen

AmoyXiamen, ChinaXiamen, Fujian
They could be categorized as originating from Xiamen, Quanzhou and Zhangzhou based on their dialects and districts of origin.
While it is widely spoken in and around Xiamen, especially by its native speakers, the Amoy dialect has no official status.

Han Taiwanese

HanTaiwaneseTaiwanese Han
They include the Taiwanese Minnan and Hakka people that arrived in Taiwan before World War II and the post-World War II Han immigrants.

Teochew people

TeochewTeochewsTeochew Chinese
The Teochews were often called Fulao (Hoklo) because they came mostly from Henan and Shanxi via Fujian, with well-maintained language and customs from ancient north-central China.

Demographics of Taiwan

TaiwanDemographics of Taiwanese AboriginesEthnicity of Taiwan
The ROC government reports that 95 to 97 percent of Taiwan's population is of Han Chinese ethnicity, which includes Hoklo, Hakka, and other ethnic groups originating from mainland China.

Chinese people in Myanmar

Burmese ChineseChineseSino-Burmese
* Hokkien Chinese (Burmese: eingyi shay, or let shay lit. long-sleeved jackets) from Fujian Province.

Malaysian Chinese

ChineseChinese Malaysianethnic Chinese
The Hoklo or Hokkien-lang (as they are known in these countries) are the largest dialect group among the Malaysian Chinese, Singapore and southern part of Thailand.
By the late 19th century with the second wave of migration through the British colonial rule, the Hokkien of southern Fujian led by many of their wealthy and powerful individuals with skills in finance and maritime shipping became the dominant immigrant group as the first group of ethnic Chinese to settle in large numbers with their language become a contact language among Chinese of different linguistics background.

Hoklo Americans

Hokkien and Hoklo Americans
'''The Hoklo people are a Han Chinese subgroup with ancestral roots in Southern Fujian and Eastern Guangdong, particularly around the modern prefecture-level cities of Quanzhou, Zhangzhou, Xiamen and Chaoshan area.They are also known by various endonyms (Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Hok-ló-lâng / Hō-ló-lâng / Ho̍h-ló-lâng / Hô-ló-lâng), or other related terms such as Hoklo people, Banlam (Minnan) people (閩南儂; Bân-lâm-lâng), Hokkien people (福建儂; Hok-kiàn-lâng) or Teochew people (潮州人;Tiê-tsiu-lâng).

Lufeng, Guangdong

LufengLufeng DistrictChangshan
The Minnan speaking people in Haifeng and Lufeng are known as Hailufeng Hokkiens or Hailufeng Minnan, in a narrow scope, but are often mistaken by outsiders as Chaozhou/Teochew people in Hong Kong and Southeast Asia.
More specifically, a considerable percentage of the population belong to the Minnan sub group; the rest are Teochews, Hakka and Ming Dynasty Jianghuai military speakers.

Chinese Indonesians

Chinese IndonesianChineseChinese-Indonesian
The Hoklo or Hokkien-lang are also the largest group among the Chinese Indonesians.
The first group of Chinese people to settle in large numbers during the early 18th century fleeing from Qing persecution were the Teochews from Chaozhou, the Hakkas from Chengxiang county (now renamed Meixian), Huizhou (pronounced Fuizhew in Hakka) and rural county of Dabu (pronounced Thaipo in Hakka), the Cantonese from Guangdong and various different ethnic dialect groups who left the trading city ports of southern Fujian including Hokkiens, Hakkas, etc. Descendants of Hokkiens are the dominant group in eastern Indonesia, Central and East Java and the western coast of Sumatra.

Amoy dialect

AmoyXiamenXiamen dialect
Hokkien has 5 to 7 tones or 7 to 9 tones according to traditional sense, depending on variety of hokkien spoken such as the Amoy dialect for example has 7-8 tones.