Hollenhorst plaque

Hollenhorst's plaqueplaques of Hollenhorst
A Hollenhorst plaque is a cholesterol embolus that is seen in a blood vessel of the retina.wikipedia
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Cholesterol embolism

cholesterol embolicholesterolCholesterol embolus
A Hollenhorst plaque is a cholesterol embolus that is seen in a blood vessel of the retina.
Emboli to the eye can be seen by ophthalmoscopy and are known as plaques of Hollenhorst.

Robert Hollenhorst

Dr. Robert Hollenhorst
The phenomenon is named after the American ophthalmologist Dr. Robert Hollenhorst (1913–2008) who first described their significance in 1961.
Dr. Robert W. Hollenhorst (12 August 1913, St. Cloud, Minnesota – 10 January 2008, Rochester, Minnesota) was an American ophthalmologist remembered for describing Hollenhorst plaques.

Blood vessel

vascularblood vesselsintravascular
A Hollenhorst plaque is a cholesterol embolus that is seen in a blood vessel of the retina.

Retina

retinal diseasesretinalretinal disease
A Hollenhorst plaque is a cholesterol embolus that is seen in a blood vessel of the retina.

Physician

doctormedical doctorphysicians
It is usually seen when a physician performs ophthalmoscopy, during which a plaque will appear bright, refractile, and yellow.

Ophthalmoscopy

ophthalmoscopefundoscopyfundoscopic
It is usually seen when a physician performs ophthalmoscopy, during which a plaque will appear bright, refractile, and yellow.

Internal carotid artery

internal carotid arteriesinternal carotidinternal
It is caused by an embolus lodged within the retinal vessel that originated from an atheromatous plaque in a more proximal (upstream) vessel, usually the internal carotid artery.

Atherosclerosis

atheroscleroticatherogenesisatherosclerotic plaques
It is often an indication of a previous ischemic episode in the eye and is a sign of severe atherosclerosis.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
The phenomenon is named after the American ophthalmologist Dr. Robert Hollenhorst (1913–2008) who first described their significance in 1961.

Ophthalmology

ophthalmologistophthalmicoculist
The phenomenon is named after the American ophthalmologist Dr. Robert Hollenhorst (1913–2008) who first described their significance in 1961.