Home run

home runsHRhomerhomershomeredHRshomerunhome-runhomerunssolo home run
In baseball, a home run (abbreviated HR) is scored when the ball is hit in such a way that the batter is able to circle the bases and reach home safely in one play without any errors being committed by the defensive team in the process.wikipedia
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Inside-the-park home run

inside-the-parkinside the parkinside-the-park grand slam
There is also the "inside-the-park" home run where the batter reaches home safely while the baseball is in play on the field.
In baseball, an inside-the-park home run is a play where a batter hits a home run without hitting the ball out of the field of play.

Baseball

playerbaseball playerbaseball team
In baseball, a home run (abbreviated HR) is scored when the ball is hit in such a way that the batter is able to circle the bases and reach home
If the ball is hit in the air within the foul lines over the entire outfield (and outfield fence, if there is one), or otherwise safely circles all the bases, it is a home run: the batter and any runners on base may all freely circle the bases, each scoring a run.

Double (baseball)

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In professional baseball, a batted ball that goes over the outfield wall after touching the ground (i.e. a ball that bounces over the outfield wall) becomes an automatic double. If any defensive play on an inside-the-park home run is labeled an error by the official scorer, a home run is not scored; instead, it is scored as a single, double, or triple, and the batter-runner and any applicable preceding runners are said to have taken all additional bases on error.
A double is a type of hit (the others being the single, triple and home run) and is sometimes called a "two-bagger" or "two-base hit".

1960 World Series

1960World SeriesWorld Series Champion
The first was the 1960 World Series when Bill Mazeroski of the Pittsburgh Pirates hit a 9th inning solo home run in the 7th game of the series off New York Yankees pitcher Ralph Terry to give the Pirates the World Championship.
It is most notable for the Game 7, ninth-inning home run hit by Bill Mazeroski, the only time a winner-take-all World Series game has ended with a walk-off home run.

Ralph Kiner

KinerKiner, Ralph
Home runs are among the most popular aspects of baseball and, as a result, prolific home run hitters are usually the most popular among fans and consequently the highest paid by teams—hence the old saying, "Home run hitters drive Cadillacs, and singles hitters drive Fords (coined, circa 1948, by veteran pitcher Fritz Ostermueller, by way of mentoring his young teammate, Ralph Kiner).
Kiner's string of seasons leading the league in home runs reached seven in 1952, when he hit 37. This also was the last of a record six consecutive seasons in which he led Major League Baseball in home runs, all under the guidance of manager Billy Meyer and Pirate great Honus Wagner.

Ichiro Suzuki

Ichirorelentless trainingSuzuki Ichirō
Ichiro Suzuki of the American League team hit a fly ball that caromed off the right-center field wall in the opposite direction from where National League right fielder Ken Griffey, Jr. was expecting it to go. By the time the ball was relayed, Ichiro had already crossed the plate standing up. This was the first inside-the-park home run in All-Star Game history, and led to Suzuki being named the game's Most Valuable Player.
Ichiro also hit 13 home runs and had 29 stolen bases, helping him to earn his first of three straight Pacific League MVP (Most Valuable Player) awards.

Shot Heard 'Round the World (baseball)

Shot Heard 'Round the WorldThe Shot Heard 'Round the WorldShot Heard Round the World
Along with Mazeroski's 1960 shot, the most famous walk-off or sudden-death homer would probably be the "Shot Heard 'Round the World" hit by Bobby Thomson to win the 1951 National League pennant for the New York Giants, along with many other game-ending home runs that famously ended some of the most important and suspenseful baseball games.
In baseball, the "Shot Heard 'Round the World" was a game-winning home run by New York Giants outfielder and third baseman Bobby Thomson off Brooklyn Dodgers pitcher Ralph Branca at the Polo Grounds in New York City on October 3, 1951, to win the National League (NL) pennant.

Hit (baseball)

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When a home run is scored, the batter is also credited with a hit and a run scored, and an RBI for each runner that scores, including himself.
A home run is also scored as a hit.

Ground rule double

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This is colloquially referred to as a "ground rule double" because the rule is not strictly written into the rules of baseball, but is rather a rule of the field (or "grounds") being used.
An automatic double is the term used to refer to a fairly hit ball leaving the field in circumstances that do not merit a home run, as described in Major League Baseball (MLB) rules 5.05(a)(6) through 5.05(a)(9).

Run batted in

Runs batted inRBIRBIs
When a home run is scored, the batter is also credited with a hit and a run scored, and an RBI for each runner that scores, including himself.
However, critics, particularly within the field of sabermetrics, argue that RBIs measure the quality of the lineup more than it does the player himself since an RBI can only be credited to a player if one or more batters preceding him in the batting order reached base (the exception to this being a home run, in which the batter is credited with driving himself in, not just those already on base).

1993 World Series

1993World Series11 years later
The second time was the 1993 World Series when Joe Carter of the Toronto Blue Jays hit a 9th inning 3-run home run off Philadelphia Phillies pitcher Mitch Williams in Game 6 of the series, to help the Toronto Blue Jays capture their second World Series Championship in a row.
With Toronto ahead three games to two in the Series, but trailing Game 6 by a score of 6-5 with one out in the bottom of the ninth inning, with runners on first and second base and a count of two balls and two strikes, Joe Carter hit a game-winning three-run home run to win Game 6 by a score of 8-6 and the series four-games-to-two for Toronto, its second consecutive championship (the first team to repeat as champions since the 1977–78 Yankees).

Toronto Blue Jays

Blue JaysTorontoTOR
The second time was the 1993 World Series when Joe Carter of the Toronto Blue Jays hit a 9th inning 3-run home run off Philadelphia Phillies pitcher Mitch Williams in Game 6 of the series, to help the Toronto Blue Jays capture their second World Series Championship in a row.
Toronto won the snowy affair 9–5, led by Doug Ault's two home runs.

Rickey Henderson

In MLB, Rickey Henderson holds the career record with 81 lead-off home runs.
He holds the major league records for career stolen bases, runs, unintentional walks and leadoff home runs.

Ian Kinsler

Craig Biggio holds the National League career record with 53, third overall to Henderson, and Soriano with 54. As of 2018, Ian Kinsler held the career record among active players, with 48 leadoff home runs, which also ranked him fourth all-time.
Kinsler has twice hit 30 home runs and stolen 30 bases in the same season (2009 and 2011), and is one of 12 ballplayers in major league history who have had multiple 30–30 club seasons.

Baseball field

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In modern baseball, the feat is typically achieved by hitting the ball over the outfield fence between the foul poles (or making contact with either foul pole) without first touching the ground, resulting in an automatic home run.
Foul poles, if present, help umpires judge whether a fly ball hit above the fence line is foul (out of play) or fair (a home run).

Triple (baseball)

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The speed of the runner is crucial as even triples are relatively rare in most modern ballparks. If any defensive play on an inside-the-park home run is labeled an error by the official scorer, a home run is not scored; instead, it is scored as a single, double, or triple, and the batter-runner and any applicable preceding runners are said to have taken all additional bases on error.
The trend for modern ballparks is to have smaller outfields (often increasing the number of home runs); it has ensured that the career and season triples leaders mostly consist of those who played early in Major League Baseball history, generally in the dead-ball era.

Fernando Tatís

Fernando Tatis
On April 23, 1999, Fernando Tatís made history by hitting two grand slams in one inning, both against Chan Ho Park of the Los Angeles Dodgers.
He hit 34 home runs with 107 RBIs and 21 stolen bases, with a .298 batting average.

Forbes Field

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On July 25, 1956, Roberto Clemente became the only MLB player to have ever scored a walk-off inside-the-park grand slam in a 9–8 Pittsburgh Pirates win over the Chicago Cubs, at Forbes Field.
Barney Dreyfuss "hated cheap home runs and vowed he'd have none in his park", which led him to design a large playing field for Forbes Field.

Manny Ramirez

Manny RamírezMannyRamirez
On April 22, 2007 the Boston Red Sox were trailing the New York Yankees 3–0 when Manny Ramirez, J. D. Drew, Mike Lowell and Jason Varitek hit back-to-back-to-back-to-back home runs to put them up 4–3.
He was a nine-time Silver Slugger and was one of 25 players to hit 500 career home runs.

Craig Biggio

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Craig Biggio holds the National League career record with 53, third overall to Henderson, and Soriano with 54. As of 2018, Ian Kinsler held the career record among active players, with 48 leadoff home runs, which also ranked him fourth all-time.
He also holds the NL record for most times leading off a game with a home run (53), and is one of only five players with 250 home runs and 400 steals.

Bryce Harper

Bryce Aron Max HarperBrycer Harper
The most recent occurrence was on July 27, 2017, when the Washington Nationals hit four in a row against the Milwaukee Brewers in Nationals Park as Brian Goodwin, Wilmer Difo, Bryce Harper and Ryan Zimmerman homered off pitcher Michael Blazek.
He won the NL Rookie of the Year Award in 2012, and tied for the NL lead in home runs in the 2015 Major League Baseball season.

Single (baseball)

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If any defensive play on an inside-the-park home run is labeled an error by the official scorer, a home run is not scored; instead, it is scored as a single, double, or triple, and the batter-runner and any applicable preceding runners are said to have taken all additional bases on error.
Hitters who focus on hitting singles rather than doubles or home runs are often called "contact hitters".

Boston Red Sox

Red SoxBostonBoston Americans
On April 22, 2007 the Boston Red Sox were trailing the New York Yankees 3–0 when Manny Ramirez, J. D. Drew, Mike Lowell and Jason Varitek hit back-to-back-to-back-to-back home runs to put them up 4–3. On July 29, 2003 against the Texas Rangers, Bill Mueller of the Boston Red Sox became the only player in major league history to hit two grand slams in one game from opposite sides of the plate.
Yastrzemski won the American League Triple Crown (the most recent player to accomplish such a feat until Miguel Cabrera did so in 2012), hitting .326 with 44 home runs and 121 runs batted in.

In flight

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In modern times a home run is most often scored when the ball is hit over the outfield wall between the foul poles (in fair territory) before it touches the ground (in flight), and without being caught or deflected back onto the field by a fielder.
If a batted ball passes out of the playing field in flight and is fair, it is an automatic home run, entitling the batter and all runners to score without liability to be put out.

Oracle Park

San FranciscoAT&T ParkSan Francisco, California
An example of an unexpected bounce occurred during the 2007 Major League Baseball All-Star Game at AT&T Park in San Francisco on July 10, 2007.
In the first game of that series, the Giants lost 6–5, highlighted by three home runs from the Dodgers' Kevin Elster.