Homo antecessor

H. antecessorEarly humans
Homo antecessor is a proposed archaic human species of the Lower Paleolithic, known to have been present in Western Europe (Spain, England and France) between about 1.2 million and 0.8 million years ago (Mya).wikipedia
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Archaic humans

archaic humanarchaic ''Homo sapiensarchaic
Homo antecessor is a proposed archaic human species of the Lower Paleolithic, known to have been present in Western Europe (Spain, England and France) between about 1.2 million and 0.8 million years ago (Mya).
The term typically includes Homo neanderthalensis (430+–25 ka), Denisovans, Homo rhodesiensis (300–125 ka), Homo heidelbergensis (600–200 ka), and Homo antecessor.

Homo erectus

H. erectusDmanisi ManPithecanthropus erectus'' (later redesignated ''Homo erectus'')
antecessor as a separate species consider the fossils in question an early form of H. heidelbergensis or as a European variety of H. erectus''.
erectus may not be literally extinct (in the sense of having no surviving descendants) as it has been hypothesized that on several levels it may be a direct ancestor of later hominins including Homo heidelbergensis, Homo antecessor, Homo neanderthalensis, Homo denisova, and Homo sapiens''.

Homo heidelbergensis

H. heidelbergensisRhodesian ManH. rhodesiensis
antecessor as a separate species consider the fossils in question an early form of H. heidelbergensis or as a European variety of H. erectus''.
Its exact relation both to the earlier Homo antecessor and Homo ergaster, and to the later lineages of Neanderthals, Denisovans, and modern humans is unclear.

Human

humanshuman beinghuman beings
Arsuaga also claims that the frequency range of audition is similar to H. sapiens, which makes him suspect that ''H.
erectus spread through Eurasia from c. 500,000 years ago evolving into H. antecessor, H. heidelbergensis and H. neanderthalensis''.

England

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿EnglishENG
Evidence of early human presence in England and France has later been tentatively associated with ''H.
The earliest known evidence of human presence in the area now known as England was that of Homo antecessor, dating to approximately 780,000 years ago.

Eudald Carbonell

CarbonellEudald Carbonell Roura
It was described in 1997 by Eudald Carbonell, Juan Luis Arsuaga and J. M. Bermúdez de Castro, who based on its "unique mix of modern and primitive traits" classified it as a previously unknown archaic human species. Archaeologist Eudald Carbonell of the Universidad Rovira i Virgili in Tarragona, Spain and palaeoanthropologist Juan Luis Arsuaga of the Complutense University of Madrid discovered Homo antecessor remains at the Gran Dolina site in the Sierra de Atapuerca, east of Burgos, Spain.
His findings include the discovery of Homo antecessor, and well-preserved remains of Homo heidelbergensis.

Atapuerca Mountains

AtapuercaSierra de AtapuercaSima de los Huesos
antecessor'' were found at two sites in the Sierra de Atapuerca region of northern Spain (Gran Dolina and Sima del Elefante). Archaeologist Eudald Carbonell of the Universidad Rovira i Virgili in Tarragona, Spain and palaeoanthropologist Juan Luis Arsuaga of the Complutense University of Madrid discovered Homo antecessor remains at the Gran Dolina site in the Sierra de Atapuerca, east of Burgos, Spain.
This "exceptional reserve of data" has been deposited during extensive Lower Paleolithic presence, as the Atapuerca Mountains served as the preferred occupation site of Homo erectus, Homo antecessor (or Homo erectus antecessor), Homo heidelbergensis and Homo neanderthalensis communities.

Spain

SpanishESPKingdom of Spain
Archaeologist Eudald Carbonell of the Universidad Rovira i Virgili in Tarragona, Spain and palaeoanthropologist Juan Luis Arsuaga of the Complutense University of Madrid discovered Homo antecessor remains at the Gran Dolina site in the Sierra de Atapuerca, east of Burgos, Spain.
In Atapuerca fossils have been found of the earliest known hominins in Europe, the Homo antecessor.

Burgos

Burgos, SpainMuseo de BurgosMuseum of Burgos
Archaeologist Eudald Carbonell of the Universidad Rovira i Virgili in Tarragona, Spain and palaeoanthropologist Juan Luis Arsuaga of the Complutense University of Madrid discovered Homo antecessor remains at the Gran Dolina site in the Sierra de Atapuerca, east of Burgos, Spain.
Early humans occupied sites around Burgos as early as 800,000 years ago.

Homo

early humansearly humanhumans
The fossils associated with Homo antecessor represent the oldest direct fossil record of the presence of Homo in Europe.
The species status of H. rudolfensis, H. ergaster, H. georgicus, H. antecessor, H. cepranensis, H. rhodesiensis, H. neanderthalensis, Denisova hominin, Red Deer Cave people, and H. floresiensis remains under debate.

Prehistoric Norfolk

Happisburghearliest period
In 2010, stone tool finds were reported in Happisburgh, Norfolk, England, dated to about 950,000 years ago, the earliest known evidence for hominin presence in Northern Europe.
Homo antecessor evidence in Norfolk.

Pakefield

Pakefield, East AngliaPakefield, Suffolk
In 2005, flint tools and teeth from the same strata as fossils of the water vole Mimomys savini, a key dating species, were found in the cliffs at Pakefield near Lowestoft in Suffolk.
This suggests that hominins can be dated in England to 700,000 years ago, potentially a cross between Homo antecessor and Homo heidelbergensis.

Early expansions of hominins out of Africa

out of AfricaOut of Africa Iearly dispersal
Later waves of expansion are proposed around 1.4 Ma (early Acheulean industries), associated with Homo antecessor and 0.8 Ma (cleaver-producing Acheulean groups, associated with Homo heidelbergensis).

Neanderthal

NeanderthalsHomo neanderthalensisNeanderthal man
Happisburgh is close to the 53rd parallel north, which also represents the known northern limit of the Neanderthal range in the Middle Paleolithic.
800 kya has H. antecessor as the LCA; however, different variations of this model would push the date back to 1 million years ago.

Happisburgh footprints

human footprintsfootprintsearliest footprints in Europe
In May 2013, sets of fossilized footprints were discovered in an estuary at Happisburgh.
The footprints measured between 140 and 260 mm, thought to equate to heights between 0.9 and 1.7 m. It is believed that the individuals who made them were from the species Homo antecessor, known to have lived in the Atapuerca Mountains of Spain around 800,000 years ago.

Lower Paleolithic

Lower PalaeolithicEarly Stone AgeLower
Homo antecessor is a proposed archaic human species of the Lower Paleolithic, known to have been present in Western Europe (Spain, England and France) between about 1.2 million and 0.8 million years ago (Mya).

Western Europe

WesternWestern EuropeanWest European
Homo antecessor is a proposed archaic human species of the Lower Paleolithic, known to have been present in Western Europe (Spain, England and France) between about 1.2 million and 0.8 million years ago (Mya).

Juan Luis Arsuaga

Arsuaga
It was described in 1997 by Eudald Carbonell, Juan Luis Arsuaga and J. M. Bermúdez de Castro, who based on its "unique mix of modern and primitive traits" classified it as a previously unknown archaic human species. Archaeologist Eudald Carbonell of the Universidad Rovira i Virgili in Tarragona, Spain and palaeoanthropologist Juan Luis Arsuaga of the Complutense University of Madrid discovered Homo antecessor remains at the Gran Dolina site in the Sierra de Atapuerca, east of Burgos, Spain.

Chronospecies

paleosubspeciesPaleospeciesfaunal turnover
H. antecessor has been proposed as a chronospecies intermediate between H. erectus (c.

Homo ergaster

H. ergasterTelanthropus capensisAtlanthropus
H. antecessor has been proposed as a chronospecies intermediate between H. erectus (c.

Principle of Priority

prioritynomenclatural prioritydefined earlier
heidelbergensis, which by the taxonomic principle of priority would extend the range of H.

Mitochondrial DNA

mtDNAmitochondrialmitochondrial genome
A 2013 analysis of mitochondrial DNA of a 400,000-year-old femur the Sima de los Huesos site suggested a closer link of Iberian ''H.

Denisovan

DenisovansDenisova homininHomo denisova
heidelbergensis'' to the Denisova hominins of Siberia than to Neanderthals.

Nuclear DNA

nuclearnDNAnuclear genome
However, an analysis of nuclear DNA published by the same team in 2016 established that the Sima hominins are, after all, genetically closer to Neanderthals than to Denisovans.

Robustness (morphology)

robustrobustnessgracile
antecessor, yet it was likely to have been more robust than H.