Horace Kallen

Horace Mayer Kallen
Horace Meyer Kallen (August 11, 1882 – February 16, 1974) was a Polish-born American philosopher who supported pluralism and Zionism.wikipedia
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George Santayana

SantayanaSantayana, GeorgeGeorge '''Santayana
Kallen studied philosophy at Harvard University under George Santayana; in 1903, he received a BA magna cum laude.
Some of his Harvard students became famous in their own right, including T. S. Eliot, Robert Frost, Gertrude Stein, Horace Kallen, Walter Lippmann, and W. E. B. Du Bois.

Bierutów

BernstadtBernstadt (Bierutów)Bernstadt an der Weide
Horace Meyer Kallen was born on August 11, 1882, in the town of Bernstadt, Austrian Silesia (now Bierutów, Lower Silesian Voivodeship, Poland).
Horace Kallen (1882–1974), German-American philosopher

The New School

New School for Social ResearchNew SchoolThe New School for Social Research
In 1911, he moved to teach philosophy at the University of Wisconsin–Madison until 1918, when he was named a professor at The New School in New York City as a founding member, where he remained for the rest of his career.
Founders included economist and literary scholar Alvin Johnson, historian Charles A. Beard, economists Thorstein Veblen and James Harvey Robinson, and philosophers Horace M. Kallen and John Dewey.

Sidney Hook

Sydney HookHookHook, Sidney
By 1933, Kallen and his colleague Sidney Hook were serving on the ACLU's academic freedom committee.
By 1933, Hook and New School colleague Horace M. Kallen were serving also on the ACLU's academic freedom committee.

William James

JamesWilliamJames, William
He was acquainted with William James, whose last unfinished book he edited.
Among James's students at Harvard University were luminaries such as Boris Sidis, Theodore Roosevelt, George Santayana, W. E. B. Du Bois, G. Stanley Hall, Ralph Barton Perry, Gertrude Stein, Horace Kallen, Morris Raphael Cohen, Walter Lippmann, Alain Locke, C. I. Lewis, and Mary Whiton Calkins.

Cultural pluralism

pluralisticpluralismcultural
Kallen is credited with coining the term cultural pluralism.
The idea of cultural pluralism in the United States has its roots in the transcendentalist movement and was developed by pragmatist philosophers such as Horace Kallen, William James and John Dewey, and later thinkers such as Randolph Bourne.

List of American philosophers

American Philosophers
List of American philosophers
Horace Kallen

Immanuel Velikovsky

VelikovskyVelikovsky affair
In 1939 he became acquainted with Immanuel Velikovsky and became a lifelong friend, informal literary advisor, mentor, and advocate.
More recently, James Gilbert, professor of history at University of Maryland, challenged this traditional version with an account that focused on the intellectual rivalry between Velikovsky's ally Horace Kallen and Harlow Shapley.

John Day Company

John DayJohn Day publishersJohn Day publishing house
College Prolongs Infancy, John Day (1932)
Horace Meyer Kallen, College Prolongs Infancy

Pluralism (political philosophy)

pluralismpolitical pluralismpluralistic
Horace Meyer Kallen (August 11, 1882 – February 16, 1974) was a Polish-born American philosopher who supported pluralism and Zionism.

Zionism

ZionistZionistsZionist movement
Horace Meyer Kallen (August 11, 1882 – February 16, 1974) was a Polish-born American philosopher who supported pluralism and Zionism.

Austrian Silesia

SilesiaUpper and Lower SilesiaDuchy of Upper and Lower Silesia
Horace Meyer Kallen was born on August 11, 1882, in the town of Bernstadt, Austrian Silesia (now Bierutów, Lower Silesian Voivodeship, Poland).

Lower Silesian Voivodeship

Lower SilesiaLower Silesiandolnośląskie
Horace Meyer Kallen was born on August 11, 1882, in the town of Bernstadt, Austrian Silesia (now Bierutów, Lower Silesian Voivodeship, Poland).

Poland

🇵🇱PolishPOL
Horace Meyer Kallen was born on August 11, 1882, in the town of Bernstadt, Austrian Silesia (now Bierutów, Lower Silesian Voivodeship, Poland).

Harvard University

HarvardHarvard CollegeHarvard University’s
Kallen studied philosophy at Harvard University under George Santayana; in 1903, he received a BA magna cum laude.

Latin honors

magna cum laudesumma cum laudecum laude
Kallen studied philosophy at Harvard University under George Santayana; in 1903, he received a BA magna cum laude.

Woodrow Wilson

WilsonPresident WilsonPresident Woodrow Wilson
That same year, Kallen was personally hired by future American President Woodrow Wilson, then Princeton University's president, to become the first Jew to ever teach at the university.

Princeton University

PrincetonCollege of New JerseyPrinceton College
That same year, Kallen was personally hired by future American President Woodrow Wilson, then Princeton University's president, to become the first Jew to ever teach at the university.

Jews

JewishJewJewish people
That same year, Kallen was personally hired by future American President Woodrow Wilson, then Princeton University's president, to become the first Jew to ever teach at the university.

University of Oxford

OxfordOxford UniversityUniversity
In 1908, Kallen received his doctorate and was awarded a Sheldon Travelling Fellowship to study at Oxford University.

Rhodes Scholarship

Rhodes ScholarRhodes ScholarsRhodes
He was also a lifetime friend of Alain Locke, whom he met at Harvard and who was the first African-American Rhodes Scholar; and would remain the only one until the 1960s.

Philosophy

philosophicalphilosopherhistory of philosophy
He lectured in philosophy at Harvard from his graduation until 1911, occasionally working as a logic instructor at Clark College in Worcester, Massachusetts.

Logic

logicianlogicallogics
He lectured in philosophy at Harvard from his graduation until 1911, occasionally working as a logic instructor at Clark College in Worcester, Massachusetts.

Clark University

ClarkClark (MA)Clark College
He lectured in philosophy at Harvard from his graduation until 1911, occasionally working as a logic instructor at Clark College in Worcester, Massachusetts.

Worcester, Massachusetts

WorcesterWorcester, MAWorcester, Mass.
He lectured in philosophy at Harvard from his graduation until 1911, occasionally working as a logic instructor at Clark College in Worcester, Massachusetts.