Hot dog

hot dogsfrankfurterhotdogfrankfurterswienerhot-dogshotdogshot-dogwienersDogs
The hot dog or dog (also spelled hotdog) is a grilled or steamed link-sausage sandwich where the sausage is served in the slit of a partially sliced hot dog bun, a bun of size and shape to hold the sausage.wikipedia
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Hot dog bun

bunbunshot dog-style bun
The hot dog or dog (also spelled hotdog) is a grilled or steamed link-sausage sandwich where the sausage is served in the slit of a partially sliced hot dog bun, a bun of size and shape to hold the sausage.
A hot dog bun is a type of soft bun shaped specifically to contain a hot dog or another type of sausage.

Mustard (condiment)

mustardhoney mustardhot mustard
Typical condiments include mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise, and relish, and common garnishes include onions, sauerkraut, chili, cheese, coleslaw, and olives.
Commonly paired with meats and cheeses, mustard is also added to sandwiches, hamburgers, corn dogs, and hot dogs.

Sausage

sausagespork sausagesmoked sausage
The hot dog or dog (also spelled hotdog) is a grilled or steamed link-sausage sandwich where the sausage is served in the slit of a partially sliced hot dog bun, a bun of size and shape to hold the sausage.
Cooked sausages are made with fresh meats, and then fully cooked. They are either eaten immediately after cooking or must be refrigerated. Examples include hot dogs, Braunschweiger, and liver sausage.

Hot dog variations

Hotdog styleHot dogHot dog variants
Hot dog variants include the corn dog and pigs in a blanket.
This is a listing of regional variations on the hot dog. Different areas of the world have local variations on the type of meat used, condiments, and means of preparation, which are enumerated below.

Corn dog

corn dogscorndogcorndogs
Hot dog variants include the corn dog and pigs in a blanket.
A corn dog (also spelled corndog) is a sausage (usually a hot dog) on a stick that has been coated in a thick layer of cornmeal batter and deep fried.

Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest

Controversies" sectionHirofumi Nakajimahot dog eating contests
The hot dog's cultural traditions include the Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest and the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile.
The Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest is an annual American hot dog competitive eating competition.

Ketchup

tomato ketchuptomato saucecatsup
Typical condiments include mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise, and relish, and common garnishes include onions, sauerkraut, chili, cheese, coleslaw, and olives.
Tomato ketchup is most often used as a condiment to dishes that are usually served hot and may be fried or greasy: french fries, hamburgers, hot dogs, chicken tenders, tater tots, hot sandwiches, meat pies, cooked eggs, and grilled or fried meat.

Relish

pickle relishpicklesweet relish
Typical condiments include mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise, and relish, and common garnishes include onions, sauerkraut, chili, cheese, coleslaw, and olives.
Examples are chutneys and the North American relish, a pickled cucumber jam eaten with hot dogs or hamburgers.

Hot dog cart

cartsAll American Hot Dog Cartshot dog vendor
These types of sausages and their sandwiches were culturally imported from Germany and became popular in the United States, where the "hot dog" became a working-class street food sold at hot dog stands and carts.
A hot dog cart is a specialized mobile food stand for preparing and selling street food, specifically hot dogs, to passersby.

Hot dog stand

hot dog standshot dogHotdog Stand
These types of sausages and their sandwiches were culturally imported from Germany and became popular in the United States, where the "hot dog" became a working-class street food sold at hot dog stands and carts.
A hot dog stand is a business that sells hot dogs, usually from an external counter.

Charles Feltman

Another possible origin for serving the sausages in rolls is the pieman Charles Feltman, at Coney Island in New York City.
Charles Feltman (November 8, 1841 – September 20, 1910) was a German-American baker who invented the hot dog in 1867 at Coney Island, New York.

Nathan Handwerker

In 1916, a Polish American employee of Feltman's named Nathan Handwerker was encouraged by Eddie Cantor and Jimmy Durante, both working as waiters/musicians, to go into business in competition with his former employer.
Nathan Handwerker (June 14, 1892 – March 24, 1974) was the founder of an iconic hot dog stand that evolved into Nathan's Famous restaurants and related Nathan's retail product line.

Cuisine of New York City

New York Cityits cuisineMickey Mantle's Restaurant & Sports Bar
Hot dog preparation and condiments vary regionally in the US. Although particularly connected with New York City and its cuisine, the hot dog eventually became ubiquitous throughout the US during the 20th century, and emerged as an important part of other regional cuisines, including notably Chicago street cuisine.
* Hot dogs – Served with sauerkraut, sweet relish, onion sauce, or mustard.

Nathan's Famous

NathanNatan's Famous original locationNathan's Famous Corporation
At an earlier time in food regulation, when the hot dog was suspect, Handwerker made sure that men wearing surgeon's smocks were seen eating at Nathan's Famous to reassure potential customers.
Nathan's Famous, Inc. is an American company that operates a chain of fast food restaurants specializing in hot dogs.

Sausage sandwich

link-sausage sandwichSausagesausage butty
The hot dog or dog (also spelled hotdog) is a grilled or steamed link-sausage sandwich where the sausage is served in the slit of a partially sliced hot dog bun, a bun of size and shape to hold the sausage.
One variety, colloquially known as a hot dog, is particularly popular, especially at sporting events, carnivals, beaches, and fairs.

Street food

street-foodfood stallsstreet foods
These types of sausages and their sandwiches were culturally imported from Germany and became popular in the United States, where the "hot dog" became a working-class street food sold at hot dog stands and carts.
New York City's signature street food is the hot dog, however, New York street food also includes everything from "spicy Middle Eastern falafel or Jamaican jerk chicken to Belgian waffles"

Vienna sausage

wienerWiener WürstchenFrankfurter Würstel
The sausage used is the wiener (Vienna sausage) or frankfurter (also frank). The names of these sausages also commonly refer to their assembled sandwiches.
In some European countries, cooked and often smoked wiener sausages bought fresh from supermarkets, delicatessens and butcher shops may be called by a name (such as in German or French) which translates in English as "Vienna sausage."

Bun

bunsList of bunshamburger buns
The hot dog or dog (also spelled hotdog) is a grilled or steamed link-sausage sandwich where the sausage is served in the slit of a partially sliced hot dog bun, a bun of size and shape to hold the sausage.

Cheese

cheesesrindCheese making
Typical condiments include mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise, and relish, and common garnishes include onions, sauerkraut, chili, cheese, coleslaw, and olives.
The mother can also acquire infection from ingesting food that contains other animal products such as, unpasteurized milk, delicatessen meats, and hot dogs.

Chili con carne

chilichile verdechilis
Typical condiments include mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise, and relish, and common garnishes include onions, sauerkraut, chili, cheese, coleslaw, and olives.
A chili dog is a hot dog served with a topping of chili (usually without beans).

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
Another possible origin for serving the sausages in rolls is the pieman Charles Feltman, at Coney Island in New York City. Hot dog preparation and condiments vary regionally in the US. Although particularly connected with New York City and its cuisine, the hot dog eventually became ubiquitous throughout the US during the 20th century, and emerged as an important part of other regional cuisines, including notably Chicago street cuisine.
Central and Eastern European immigrants, especially Jewish immigrants from those regions, brought bagels, cheesecake, hot dogs, knishes, and delicatessens (or delis) to the city.

Louisiana Purchase Exposition

1904 World's FairSt. Louis World's Fair1904 St. Louis World's Fair
In another version, Antoine Feuchtwanger, or Anton Ludwig Feuchtwanger, served sausages in rolls at the World's Fair – either at the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis, or, earlier, at the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition, in Chicago – again, allegedly because the white gloves provided to customers to protect their hands were being kept as souvenirs.
Other claims are more dubious, including the hamburger and hot dog (both traditional American foods), peanut butter, iced tea, and cotton candy.

Culture of the United States

American cultureAmericanculture
The hot dog became closely associated with baseball and American culture.
Iconic American dishes such as apple pie, fried chicken, pizza, hamburgers, and hot dogs derive from the recipes of various immigrants and domestic innovations.

Coburg

BertelsdorfCallenbergCoburg, Germany
Johann Georg Lahner, an 18th/19th century butcher from the Franconian city of Coburg, is said to have brought the Frankfurter Würstchen to Vienna, where he added beef to the mixture and simply called it Frankfurter.
The National Hot Dog and Sausage Council asserts that Frankfurt is traditionally credited with originating the frankfurter.

Finger food

disheseaten without utensilsfinger foods
The history of the dish may begin with the creation of the sausage, with the placing of the sausage on bread or a bun as finger food, with the popularization of the existing dish, or with the application of the name "hot dog" to a sausage and bun combination most commonly used with ketchup or mustard and sometimes relish.
Other well-known foods that are generally eaten with the hands include hamburgers, pizza, chips, hot dogs, fruit, and bread.