Hotspot (Wi-Fi)

Wi-Fi hotspothotspothotspotsWi-Fi hotspotsWiFi HotspotWi-Fi Hot Spotwireless hotspotWiFi hotspotshot spotsWi-Fi
A hotspot is a physical location where people may obtain Internet access, typically using Wi-Fi technology, via a wireless local-area network (WLAN) using a router connected to an Internet service provider.wikipedia
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Wi-Fi

WiFiwireless internetwireless
A hotspot is a physical location where people may obtain Internet access, typically using Wi-Fi technology, via a wireless local-area network (WLAN) using a router connected to an Internet service provider. The public can use a laptop or other suitable portable device to access the wireless connection (usually Wi-Fi) provided.
An access point (or hotspot) often has a range of about 20 m indoors while some modern access points claim up to a 150 m range outdoors.

Wi-Fi positioning system

Wi-Fi positioningWi-Fi-based positioning system (WPS)Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi positioning is a method for geolocation based on the positions of nearby hotspots.
Wi-Fi positioning system (WPS), WiPS or WFPS is a geolocation system that uses the characteristics of nearby Wi-Fi hotspots and other wireless access points to discover where a device is located.

Internet access

broadband internetbroadband Internet accessbroadband
A hotspot is a physical location where people may obtain Internet access, typically using Wi-Fi technology, via a wireless local-area network (WLAN) using a router connected to an Internet service provider.
Coffee shops, shopping malls, and other venues increasingly offer wireless access to computer networks, referred to as hotspots, for users who bring their own wireless-enabled devices such as a laptop or PDA.

Piggybacking (Internet access)

piggybackingpiggybackpiggy-backing
A customer of a business providing hotspot service, such as a hotel or café, is generally not considered to be piggybacking, though non-customers or those outside the premises who are simply in reach may be.

Coffeehouse

cafécafecoffee shop
Public hotspots may be created by a business for use by customers, such as coffee shops or hotels. Public hotspots are often found at airports, bookstores, coffee shops, department stores, fuel stations, hotels, hospitals, libraries, public pay phones, restaurants, RV parks and campgrounds, supermarkets, train stations, and other public places.
One of the original uses of the café, as a place for information exchange and communication, was reintroduced in the 1990s with the Internet café or Hotspot.

RV park

caravan parkcaravan parksrecreational vehicle park
Public hotspots are often found at airports, bookstores, coffee shops, department stores, fuel stations, hotels, hospitals, libraries, public pay phones, restaurants, RV parks and campgrounds, supermarkets, train stations, and other public places.

Opportunistic Wireless Encryption

OWE
The Opportunistic Wireless Encryption (OWE) standard provides encrypted communication in open Wi-Fi networks, alongside the WPA3 standard, but is not yet widely implemented.
Opportunistic Wireless Encryption (OWE) is an extension to IEEE 802.11 which adds a standard for opportunistic encryption for use with an open Wi-Fi network.

Tethering

mobile hotspottetherTethered
The use of a private hotspot to enable other personal devices to access the WAN (usually but not always the Internet) is a form of bridging, and known as tethering.
Mobile hotspots may be protected by a PIN or password.

Internet

onlinethe Internetweb
The use of a private hotspot to enable other personal devices to access the WAN (usually but not always the Internet) is a form of bridging, and known as tethering.
Hotspots providing such access include Wi-Fi cafes, where users need to bring their own wireless devices such as a laptop or PDA.

Wireless Broadband Alliance

Wireless Broadband Alliance (WBA) Member
In 2016 the Wireless Broadband Alliance predicted a steady annual increase from 5.2m public hotspots in 2012 to 10.5m in 2018.
To achieve this, the WBA promotes interoperability initiatives including the Next Generation Hotspot (NGH), Wi-Fi Roaming and the WBA's Interoperability Compliance Program.

Wireless access point

access pointaccess pointsWAP
Public hotspots are typically created from wireless access points configured to provide Internet access, controlled to some degree by the venue.
An AP is differentiated from a hotspot, which is the physical location where Wi-Fi access to a WLAN is available.

Securing Adolescents from Exploitation-Online Act of 2007

Securing Adolescents From Exploitation-Online Act
The Securing Adolescents From Exploitation-Online Act of 2007 ( H.R. 3791) is a U.S. House bill stating that anyone offering an open Wi-Fi Internet connection to the public, who "obtains actual knowledge of any facts or circumstances" in relation to illegal visual media such as "child pornography" transferred over that connection, must register a report of their knowledge to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.

Wireless security

wireless encryptionWireless LAN Securitysecurity
If router security is not activated or if the owner deactivates it for convenience, it creates a free hotspot.

IEEE 802.11u

802.11uu
Hotspot 2.0 is based on the IEEE 802.11u standard, which is a set of protocols published in 2011 to enable cellular-like roaming.
The Wi-Fi Alliance uses IEEE 802.11u in its "Wi-Fi Certified Passpoint" program, also known as "Hotspot 2.0".

Local area network

LANlocal networklocal
Public access wireless local area networks (LANs) were first proposed by Henrik Sjödin at the NetWorld+Interop conference in The Moscone Center in San Francisco in August 1993.
Guests are often offered Internet access via a hotspot service.

Router (computing)

routerroutersnetwork router
A hotspot is a physical location where people may obtain Internet access, typically using Wi-Fi technology, via a wireless local-area network (WLAN) using a router connected to an Internet service provider.

Internet service provider

ISPInternet service providersISPs
A hotspot is a physical location where people may obtain Internet access, typically using Wi-Fi technology, via a wireless local-area network (WLAN) using a router connected to an Internet service provider.

Cellular network

cellularmobile networkcellular networks
A private hotspot, often called a tether, may be configured on a smartphone or tablet that has a mobile network data plan, to allow Internet access to other devices via Bluetooth pairing, or through the RNDIS protocol over USB, or even when both the hotspot device and the device[s] accessing it are connected to the same Wi-Fi network but one which does not provide Internet access.

Bluetooth

Bluetooth 4.0Bluetooth 5.0Bluetooth 2.0
A private hotspot, often called a tether, may be configured on a smartphone or tablet that has a mobile network data plan, to allow Internet access to other devices via Bluetooth pairing, or through the RNDIS protocol over USB, or even when both the hotspot device and the device[s] accessing it are connected to the same Wi-Fi network but one which does not provide Internet access.

RNDIS

Remote NDISMicrosoft RNDIS
A private hotspot, often called a tether, may be configured on a smartphone or tablet that has a mobile network data plan, to allow Internet access to other devices via Bluetooth pairing, or through the RNDIS protocol over USB, or even when both the hotspot device and the device[s] accessing it are connected to the same Wi-Fi network but one which does not provide Internet access.

USB

USB 2.0Universal Serial BusMicro USB
A private hotspot, often called a tether, may be configured on a smartphone or tablet that has a mobile network data plan, to allow Internet access to other devices via Bluetooth pairing, or through the RNDIS protocol over USB, or even when both the hotspot device and the device[s] accessing it are connected to the same Wi-Fi network but one which does not provide Internet access.

USB On-The-Go

USB OTGOTGUSB-OTG
Similarly, a Bluetooth or USB OTG can be used by a mobile device to provide Internet access via Wi-Fi instead of a mobile network, to a device that itself has neither Wi-Fi nor mobile network capability.

Laptop

laptop computerlaptopsnotebook computer
The public can use a laptop or other suitable portable device to access the wireless connection (usually Wi-Fi) provided.

Personal digital assistant

PDAPDAspersonal digital assistants
Of the estimated 150 million laptops, 14 million PDAs, and other emerging Wi-Fi devices sold per year for the last few years, most include the Wi-Fi feature.