House of Commons of Canada

House of CommonsMPMember of ParliamentMPsParliamentCanadian House of CommonsCanadian ParliamentHouseCommonsMember of the Canadian House of Commons
The House of Commons of Canada (Chambre des communes du Canada) is the lower chamber of the bicameral Parliament of Canada, along with the sovereign (represented by the governor general) and the Senate of Canada.wikipedia
7,349 Related Articles

Senate of Canada

SenatorSenateCanadian Senator
The House of Commons of Canada (Chambre des communes du Canada) is the lower chamber of the bicameral Parliament of Canada, along with the sovereign (represented by the governor general) and the Senate of Canada.
The Senate of Canada (Sénat du Canada) is the upper house of the Parliament of Canada, along with the House of Commons and the monarch (represented by the governor general).

Parliament of Canada

ParliamentCanadian ParliamentMP
The House of Commons of Canada (Chambre des communes du Canada) is the lower chamber of the bicameral Parliament of Canada, along with the sovereign (represented by the governor general) and the Senate of Canada.
The body consists of the Canadian monarch, represented by a viceroy, the Governor General; an upper house, the Senate; and a lower house, the House of Commons.

Centre Block

Hall of HonourCanadian Parliamentparliament buildings
The House of Commons currently meets in a temporary Commons chamber in the West Block of the parliament buildings on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, while the Centre Block, which houses the traditional Commons chamber, undergoes a ten-year renovation.
The Centre Block (Édifice du Centre) is the main building of the Canadian parliamentary complex on Parliament Hill, in Ottawa, Ontario, containing the original House of Commons and Senate chambers, as well as the offices of a number of members of parliament, senators, and senior administration for both legislative houses.

41st Canadian Parliament

41st Parliament41st41
There were 308 members in the 2011-2015 parliament (most members elected in 2011), but that number rose to 338 following the election on Monday October 19, 2015.
The 41st Canadian Parliament was in session from June 2, 2011 to August 2, 2015, with the membership of its House of Commons having been determined by the results of the 2011 federal election held on May 2, 2011.

2011 Canadian federal election

2011 federal election2011 election2011
There were 308 members in the 2011-2015 parliament (most members elected in 2011), but that number rose to 338 following the election on Monday October 19, 2015.
The 2011 Canadian federal election (formally the 41st Canadian general election) was held on Monday, May 2, 2011, to elect members to the House of Commons of Canada of the 41st Canadian Parliament.

Monarchy of Canada

Queen of CanadaCanadian monarchCanadian Royal Family
The House of Commons of Canada (Chambre des communes du Canada) is the lower chamber of the bicameral Parliament of Canada, along with the sovereign (represented by the governor general) and the Senate of Canada.
While some powers are exercisable only by the sovereign, most of the monarch's operational and ceremonial duties (such as summoning the House of Commons and accrediting ambassadors) are exercised by his or her representative, the Governor General of Canada.

2015 Canadian federal election

2015 federal election2015 election42nd Canadian federal election
There were 308 members in the 2011-2015 parliament (most members elected in 2011), but that number rose to 338 following the election on Monday October 19, 2015.
The 2015 Canadian federal election (formally the 42nd Canadian general election) was held on October 19, 2015, to elect members to the House of Commons of the 42nd Canadian Parliament.

Member of parliament

MPMemberMembers of Parliament
The House of Commons is a democratically elected body whose members are known as Members of Parliament (MPs).
The Parliament of Canada consists of the monarch, the Senate, and the House of Commons.

Electoral district (Canada)

electoral districtridingFederal riding
Members are elected by simple plurality ("first-past-the-post" system) in each of the country's electoral districts, which are colloquially known as ridings.
Each federal electoral district returns one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of Canada; each provincial or territorial electoral district returns one representative—called, depending on the province or territory, Member of the Legislative Assembly (MLA), Member of the National Assembly (MNA), Member of Provincial Parliament (MPP) or Member of the House of Assembly (MHA)—to the provincial or territorial legislature.

West Block

West
The House of Commons currently meets in a temporary Commons chamber in the West Block of the parliament buildings on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, while the Centre Block, which houses the traditional Commons chamber, undergoes a ten-year renovation.
Since 28 January 2019, it has housed the interim House of Commons Chamber, installed to accommodate the House while the Centre Block is closed.

Provinces and territories of Canada

ProvinceCanadian provinceprovincial
Seats in the House of Commons are distributed roughly in proportion to the population of each province and territory.
The legislative assemblies use a procedure similar to that of the House of Commons of Canada.

Cabinet of Canada

CabinetCanadian Cabinetfederal cabinet
Moreover, the Cabinet is responsible solely to the House of Commons.
However, the Privy Council—composed mostly of former members of parliament, current and former chief justices of Canada, and other elder statesmen—rarely meets in full; as the stipulations of responsible government require that those who directly advise the monarch and governor general on how to exercise the Royal Prerogative be accountable to the elected House of Commons of Canada, the day-to-day operation of government is guided only by a sub-group of the Privy Council made up of individuals who hold seats in parliament.

Constitution Act, 1867

British North America Act of 1867British North America Act, 1867British North America Act
The House of Commons was established in 1867, when the British North America Act (now called the Constitution Act, 1867) created the Dominion of Canada and was modelled on the British House of Commons. The House of Commons came into existence in 1867, when the British Parliament passed the British North America Act, uniting the Province of Canada (which was divided into Quebec and Ontario), Nova Scotia and New Brunswick into a single federation called the Dominion of Canada.
The Act created a federal dominion and defines much of the operation of the Government of Canada, including its federal structure, the House of Commons, the Senate, the justice system, and the taxation system.

Quebec

QuébecProvince of QuebecQC
The House of Commons came into existence in 1867, when the British Parliament passed the British North America Act, uniting the Province of Canada (which was divided into Quebec and Ontario), Nova Scotia and New Brunswick into a single federation called the Dominion of Canada.
In 2006, the House of Commons of Canada passed a symbolic motion recognizing the "Québécois as a nation within a united Canada".

Prime Minister of Canada

Prime MinisterCanadian Prime MinisterPrime Ministers
The prime minister stays in office only so long as they retain the support, or "confidence", of the lower house.
Not outlined in any constitutional document, the office exists only as per long-established convention (originating in Canada's former colonial power, the United Kingdom) that stipulates the monarch's representative, the governor general, must select as prime minister the person most likely to command the confidence of the elected House of Commons; this individual is typically the leader of the political party that holds the largest number of seats in that chamber.

Fixed election dates in Canada

fixed election datesfixed election datefixed election date law
In any case, an Act of Parliament now limits each term to four years.
During the legislative process, the Liberal-dominated Senate added an amendment listing conditions under which an election date could be modified, in order to avoid clashes with religious holidays, municipal elections, and referenda, but the House of Commons, led by Prime Minister Stephen Harper's Conservatives, rejected the amendment and the Senate did not pursue it.

Governor General of Canada

Governor GeneralGovernor-General of CanadaGovernor-General
The House of Commons of Canada (Chambre des communes du Canada) is the lower chamber of the bicameral Parliament of Canada, along with the sovereign (represented by the governor general) and the Senate of Canada.
Convention dictates, though, that the governor general must draw from the privy council an individual to act as prime minister—in almost all cases the Member of Parliament who commands the confidence of the House of Commons.

2011 Canadian Census

2011 Census2011Canada 2011 Census
The electoral quotient was defined by legislation as 111,166 for the redistribution of seats after the 2011 census and is adjusted following each decennial census by multiplying it by the average of the percentage of population change of each province since the previous decennial census.
The Statistics Act mandates a Senate and/or House of Commons (joint) committee review of the opt-in clause (for the release of one's census records after 92 years) by 2014.

John Nunziata

NUNZIATA, John V.
Most successful independent candidates have been incumbents who were expelled from their political parties (for example, John Nunziata in 1997) or who failed to win their parties' nomination (for example, Chuck Cadman in 2004).
He served three terms as a Liberal MP in the House of Commons of Canada from York South-Weston and in 1997 was elected as an Independent MP.

Chuck Cadman

Most successful independent candidates have been incumbents who were expelled from their political parties (for example, John Nunziata in 1997) or who failed to win their parties' nomination (for example, Chuck Cadman in 2004).
Charles Cadman (February 21, 1948 – July 9, 2005) was a Canadian politician and Member of Parliament (MP) from 1997 to 2005, representing the riding of Surrey North in Surrey, British Columbia.

Speaker of the House of Commons (Canada)

Speaker of the House of Commons of CanadaSpeaker of the House of CommonsSpeaker
The annual salary of each member of Parliament is, as of 2017, $172,700; members may receive additional salaries in right of other offices they hold (for instance, the Speakership).
The Speaker's role in presiding over Canada's House of Commons is similar to that of speakers elsewhere in other countries that use the Westminster system.

Question Period

Oral QuestionsQuestion Period (TV program)questions to the premier
The duties of presiding over the House are divided between the four officers aforementioned; however, the Speaker usually presides over Question Period and over the most important debates.
Question Period (période des questions), known officially as Oral Questions (questions orales) occurs each sitting day in the House of Commons of Canada.

Board of Internal Economy

The Speaker also oversees the administration of the House and is Chair of the Board of Internal Economy, the governing body for the House of Commons.
The Board of Internal Economy (Bureau de régie interne) is the body that governs the administrative and financial policies of the House of Commons of Canada.

Clerk of the House of Commons (Canada)

Clerk of the House of CommonsClerkClerk of the House of Commons of Canada
Officers of the House who are not members include the Clerk of the House of Commons, the Deputy Clerk, the Law Clerk and Parliamentary Counsel, and several other clerks.
The Clerk of the House of Commons is the senior procedural and administrative officer in the House of Commons of Canada.

Canada Elections Act

Elections ActElections Canada Actlegally
The present qualifications are outlined in the Canada Elections Act, which was passed in 2000.
The Canada Elections Act (full title: "An Act respecting the election of members to the House of Commons, repealing other Acts relating to elections and making consequential amendments to other Acts") is an Act of the Parliament of Canada which regulates the election of members of parliament to the House of Commons of Canada.