House of Habsburg

HabsburgHabsburgsHabsburg dynastyHouse of AustriaHouse of Habsburg-LorraineAustrian Imperial and Royal FamilyHabsburg EmpireHabsburg familyAustrianHabsburg-Lorraine
The House of Habsburg (alternatively spelled Hapsburg in English) and also officially called the House of Austria (Haus Österreich in German, Casa de Austria in Spanish), was one of the most influential and distinguished royal houses of Europe.wikipedia
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Habsburg Spain

SpainSpanishSpanish Habsburgs
The house also produced kings of Bohemia, Hungary, Croatia, Galicia, Portugal and Spain with their respective colonies, as well as rulers of several principalities in the Netherlands and Italy.
Habsburg Spain refers to Spain over the 16th and 17th centuries (1516–1700), when it was ruled by kings from the House of Habsburg (also associated with its role in the history of Central and Eastern Europe).

Dynasty

dynasticroyal housedynasties
The House of Habsburg (alternatively spelled Hapsburg in English) and also officially called the House of Austria (Haus Österreich in German, Casa de Austria in Spanish), was one of the most influential and distinguished royal houses of Europe.
For example, after the 1914 assassinations of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his morganatic wife, Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, their son Maximilian, Duke of Hohenberg, was bypassed for the Austro-Hungarian throne because he was not a Habsburg dynast.

Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor

Charles VEmperor Charles VCharles I of Spain
From the 16th century, following the reign of Charles V, the dynasty was split between its Austrian and Spanish branches.
Head of the rising House of Habsburg during the first half of the 16th century, his dominions in Europe included the Holy Roman Empire extending from Germany to northern Italy with direct rule over the Austrian hereditary lands and the burgundian Low Countries, and a unified Spain with its southern Italian kingdoms of Naples, Sicily, and Sardinia.

Kingdom of Hungary

HungaryHungarianHungarian Kingdom
The house also produced kings of Bohemia, Hungary, Croatia, Galicia, Portugal and Spain with their respective colonies, as well as rulers of several principalities in the Netherlands and Italy.
The House of Habsburg held the Hungarian throne after the Battle of Mohács until 1918 and also played a key role in the liberation wars against the Ottoman Empire.

Habsburg Netherlands

NetherlandsFlemishLord of the Netherlands
The house also produced kings of Bohemia, Hungary, Croatia, Galicia, Portugal and Spain with their respective colonies, as well as rulers of several principalities in the Netherlands and Italy.
Habsburg Netherlands (Habsburgse Nederlanden; Pays-Bas des Habsbourg), also referred to as Belgica or Flanders, is the collective name of Holy Roman Empire fiefs in the Low Countries held by the House of Habsburg.

Charles II of Spain

Charles IICarlos IIKing Charles II
The senior Spanish branch ended upon the death of Charles II of Spain in 1700 and was replaced by the House of Bourbon.
Charles II (Carlos; 6 November 1661 – 1 November 1700), also known as El Hechizado or the Bewitched, was the last Habsburg ruler of the Spanish Empire.

Kingdom of Bohemia

BohemiaBohemianBohemian Kingdom
The house also produced kings of Bohemia, Hungary, Croatia, Galicia, Portugal and Spain with their respective colonies, as well as rulers of several principalities in the Netherlands and Italy.
The kingdom was established by the Přemyslid dynasty in the 12th century from Duchy of Bohemia, later ruled by the House of Luxembourg, the Jagiellonian dynasty, and since 1526 by the House of Habsburg and its successor house Habsburg-Lorraine.

Oñate treaty

secret treatylaterwho would soon succeed his uncle
In the 16th century, the family separated into the senior Spanish and the junior Austrian branches, who settled their mutual claims in the Oñate treaty.
The Oñate treaty of 29 July 1617 was a secret treaty between the Austrian and Spanish branches of the House of Habsburg.

Duchy of Austria

AustriaAustrianduchy
He moved the family's power base to the Duchy of Austria, which the Habsburgs ruled until 1918. In a crucial step towards the creation of his own power base in the Eastern Alps, Rudolpf led a coalition against king Ottokar II of Bohemia who had taken advantage of the Great Interregnum in order to expand southwards, taking over first the Babenberg (Austria, Styria, Savinja), and then the Spanheim inheritance (Carinthia and Carniola).
After the ruling dukes of the House of Babenberg became extinct in male line, there was as much as three decades of rivalry on inheritance and rulership, until the German king Rudolf I took over the dominion as the first monarch of the Habsburg dynasty in 1276.

Spanish Empire

SpanishSpainSpanish colonies
A series of dynastic marriages enabled the family to vastly expand its domains to include Burgundy, Spain and its colonial empire, Bohemia, Hungary, and other territories.
The Spanish princesses married the heirs of Portugal, England and the House of Habsburg.

House of Bourbon

BourbonBourbonsBourbon dynasty
The senior Spanish branch ended upon the death of Charles II of Spain in 1700 and was replaced by the House of Bourbon.
In 1700, at the death of Charles II of Spain, the Spanish Habsburgs became extinct in the male line.

Kingdom of Croatia (Habsburg)

Kingdom of CroatiaCroatiaCroatian
The house also produced kings of Bohemia, Hungary, Croatia, Galicia, Portugal and Spain with their respective colonies, as well as rulers of several principalities in the Netherlands and Italy.
The bulk of the Croatian nobility convened the Croatian Parliament in Cetin and chose to join the Habsburg monarchy under the Austrian king Ferdinand I von Habsburg.

Emperor

empressemperorsSamraat
Although technically an elective title, by the late 16th century the imperial title had in practice come to be inherited by the Habsburg Archdukes of Austria and following the Thirty Years' War their control over the states (outside the Habsburg Monarchy, i.e. Austria, Bohemia and various territories outside the empire) had become nearly non-existent.

Holy Roman Emperor

EmperorHoly Roman EmperorsImperial
By marrying Elisabeth of Luxembourg, the daughter of Holy Roman Emperor Sigismund in 1437, Duke Albert V (1397–1439) of the Albertine line became the ruler of Bohemia and Hungary, expanding the family's political horizons.
Following the late medieval crisis of government, the Habsburgs kept possession of the title without interruption from 1440–1740.

Otto II, Count of Habsburg

Otto IIOtto II of Habsburg
His grandson Otto II was the first to take the fortress name as his own, adding "Count of Habsburg" to his title.
Otto II (died 8 November 1111) was a Graf (Count) of Habsburg and one of the founding members of the Habsburg family.

Capetian dynasty

CapetianCapetiansCapetian kings
Along with the Capetian dynasty, it was one of the two most powerful continental European royal families, dominating European politics for nearly five centuries.
Along with the House of Habsburg, it was one of the two most powerful continental European royal families, dominating European politics for nearly five centuries.

Adalrich, Duke of Alsace

AdalrichEtichoEtichon
The progenitor of the House of Habsburg may have been Guntram the Rich, a count in the Breisgau who lived in the 10th century, and forewith farther back as the early medieval Adalrich, Duke of Alsace, father of the Etichonids from which Habsburg derives.
undefined 683 AD), also known as Eticho, was the Duke of Alsace, the founder of the family of the Etichonids and of the Habsburg, and an important and influential figure in the power politic of late seventh-century Austrasia.

Francis I, Holy Roman Emperor

Francis IFrancis StephenEmperor Francis I
It was succeeded by the descendants of his eldest daughter Maria Theresa's marriage to Francis III, Duke of Lorraine.
He was connected with the Habsburgs through his grandmother Eleonore, daughter of Emperor Ferdinand III.

Duchy of Burgundy

BurgundyBurgundianBurgundians
A series of dynastic marriages enabled the family to vastly expand its domains to include Burgundy, Spain and its colonial empire, Bohemia, Hungary, and other territories.
The extinction of the dynasty led to the absorption of the duchy itself into the French crown lands by King Louis XI, while the bulk of the Burgundian possessions in the Low Countries passed to the Habsburg archduke, Maximilian I of Austria, son of Emperor Frederick III, by his marriage with Charles' daughter, Mary.

Babenberg

House of BabenbergBabenbergerBabenbergs
In a crucial step towards the creation of his own power base in the Eastern Alps, Rudolpf led a coalition against king Ottokar II of Bohemia who had taken advantage of the Great Interregnum in order to expand southwards, taking over first the Babenberg (Austria, Styria, Savinja), and then the Spanheim inheritance (Carinthia and Carniola).
Originally from Bamberg in the Duchy of Franconia (present-day Bavaria), the Babenbergs ruled the Imperial Margraviate of Austria from its creation in 976 AD until its elevation to a duchy in 1156, and from then until the extinction of the line in 1246, whereafter they were succeeded by the House of Habsburg.

Kyburg family

KyburgCounts of KyburgKyburgs
Territorially, they often profited from the extinction of other noble families such as the House of Kyburg.
The family was one of the four most powerful noble families in the Swiss plateau beside the House of Habsburg, House of Zähringen and the House of Savoy during the 12th century.

Interregnum (Holy Roman Empire)

Great InterregnumInterregnum Imperial ''interregnum
In a crucial step towards the creation of his own power base in the Eastern Alps, Rudolpf led a coalition against king Ottokar II of Bohemia who had taken advantage of the Great Interregnum in order to expand southwards, taking over first the Babenberg (Austria, Styria, Savinja), and then the Spanheim inheritance (Carinthia and Carniola).
The crisis of government of the Holy Roman Empire and the German kingdom thus lasted throughout the late medieval period, and ended only with the rise of the House of Habsburg on the eve of the German Reformation and the Renaissance.

Habsburg Castle

HabsburgHabichtsburg
The House takes its name from Habsburg Castle, a fortress built in the 1020s in present-day Switzerland, in the canton of Aargau, by Count Radbot of Klettgau, who named his fortress Habsburg.
Habsburg Castle is the originating seat of the House of Habsburg, which became one of the leading imperial and royal dynasties in Europe.

Further Austria

VorderösterreichAnterior AustriaVorlande
In the long term, this indeed succeeded, but Rudolph's brothers ignored the rule, leading to the separation of the Albertian and Leopoldian family lines in 1379: the former would maintain Austria proper, while the latter would rule over Styria, Carinthia, Carniola, which became known as Inner Austria, as well as Tyrol and the original Habsburg lands in Swabia, now known as Further Austria.
Further Austria, Outer Austria or Anterior Austria (Vorderösterreich, formerly die Vorlande (pl.)) was the collective name for the early (and later) possessions of the House of Habsburg in the former Swabian stem duchy of south-western Germany, including territories in the Alsace region west of the Rhine and in Vorarlberg.

Leopoldian line

Leopoldinian lineLeopoldian
In the long term, this indeed succeeded, but Rudolph's brothers ignored the rule, leading to the separation of the Albertian and Leopoldian family lines in 1379: the former would maintain Austria proper, while the latter would rule over Styria, Carinthia, Carniola, which became known as Inner Austria, as well as Tyrol and the original Habsburg lands in Swabia, now known as Further Austria.
The Leopoldian line was a sequence of descent in the Habsburg dynasty begun by Duke Leopold III of Austria, who, after the death of his elder brother Rudolf IV, divided the Habsburg hereditary lands with his brother Albert III according to the 1379 Treaty of Neuberg.