House of Hanover

HanoverianHanoverHanoveriansHanoverian dynastyHanoverian Crownroyal familyBrunswick-LüneburgHanoverian monarchyHanoverian royal familyBritish royal family
The House of Hanover (Haus Hannover), whose members are known as Hanoverians, is a German royal house that ruled Hanover, Great Britain, and Ireland at various times during the 17th through 20th centuries.wikipedia
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George I of Great Britain

George IKing George IKing George
George I became the first Hanoverian monarch of Great Britain and Ireland in 1714.
At the age of 54, after the death of his second cousin Anne, Queen of Great Britain, George ascended the British throne as the first monarch of the House of Hanover.

Queen Victoria

Victoriathe QueenQueen
At Victoria's death in 1901, the throne of the United Kingdom passed to her eldest son Edward VII, a member of the House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha.
She was the last British monarch of the House of Hanover.

Dynasty

dynasticroyal housedynasties
The House of Hanover (Haus Hannover), whose members are known as Hanoverians, is a German royal house that ruled Hanover, Great Britain, and Ireland at various times during the 17th through 20th centuries.
House of Hanover ( 1884–1901) – Somaliland under British rule

House of Este

Ested'EsteEstense
The House of Hanover is now the only surviving branch of the House of Welf, which is the senior branch of the House of Este.
The elder, German branch of the House of Este, known as the Younger House of Welf, included dukes of Bavaria and Brunswick-Lüneburg and produced Britain's Hanoverian monarchs, as well as one Emperor of Russia (Ivan VI) and one Holy Roman Emperor (Otto IV).

Principality of Calenberg

CalenbergBrunswick-CalenbergDuke of Brunswick-Calenberg
When the Duchy of Brunswick-Lüneburg was divided in 1635, George inherited the Principality of Calenberg and moved his residence to Hanover.
Calenberg was ruled by the House of Hanover from 1635 onwards; the princes received the ninth electoral dignity of the Holy Roman Empire in 1692.

Duchy of Brunswick-Lüneburg

BrunswickBrunswick-LüneburgDuke of Brunswick-Lüneburg
When the Duchy of Brunswick-Lüneburg was divided in 1635, George inherited the Principality of Calenberg and moved his residence to Hanover. The house originated in 1635 as a cadet branch of the House of Brunswick-Lüneburg, growing in prestige until Hanover became an Electorate in 1692. George I, George II, and George III also served as electors and dukes of Brunswick-Lüneburg, informally, Electors of Hanover (cf.
In 1714, the Hanoverian branch of the family succeeded to the throne of Great Britain, which they would rule in personal union with Hanover until 1837.

Act of Settlement 1701

Act of SettlementHanoverian succession1701 Act of Settlement
Ernest Augustus, 4th son of Duke George, Prince of Calenberg (1679–1698). He became Prince of Calenberg on the death of his brother John Frederick. He was elevated to prince-elector of the Holy Roman Empire in 1692. Ernest Augustus's wife, Sophia of the Palatinate, was declared heiress of the throne of England by the Act of Settlement of 1701, which decreed Roman Catholics could not accede to the throne. Sophia was at that time the senior eligible Protestant descendant of James I of England.
On Queen Anne's death, Sophia's son duly became King George I and started the Hanoverian dynasty in Britain.

Hanover

HannoverHanover, GermanyHannover, Germany
George I, George II, and George III also served as electors and dukes of Brunswick-Lüneburg, informally, Electors of Hanover (cf.
From 1714 to 1837, Hanover was by personal union the family seat of the Hanoverian Kings of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, under their title of the dukes of Brunswick-Lüneburg (later described as the Elector of Hanover).

Kingdom of Great Britain

Great BritainBritishBritain
George I became the first Hanoverian monarch of Great Britain and Ireland in 1714.
The Act of Settlement required that the heir to the English throne be a descendant of the Electress Sophia of Hanover and not be a Catholic; this brought about the Hanoverian succession of George I in 1714.

George III of the United Kingdom

George IIIKing George IIIKing George
George III (r. 1760–1820) Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany (r. 1764–1802), second son of George III
He was the third British monarch of the House of Hanover, but unlike his two predecessors, he was born in Great Britain, spoke English as his first language, and never visited Hanover.

William IV of the United Kingdom

William IVKing William IVDuke of Clarence
William IV (r. 1830–37)
The third son of George III, William succeeded his elder brother George IV, becoming the last king and penultimate monarch of Britain's House of Hanover.

Kingdom of Hanover

HanoverHanoverianHannover
The Kingdom of Hanover came to an end in 1866 when it was annexed by Kingdom of Prussia and the king of Hanover (and duke of Cumberland) forced to go into exile in Austria.
The kingdom was ruled by the House of Hanover, a cadet branch of the House of Welf, in personal union with the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until 1837.

Sophia of Hanover

Sophia, Electress of HanoverSophiaElectress Sophia
Ernest Augustus, 4th son of Duke George, Prince of Calenberg (1679–1698). He became Prince of Calenberg on the death of his brother John Frederick. He was elevated to prince-elector of the Holy Roman Empire in 1692. Ernest Augustus's wife, Sophia of the Palatinate, was declared heiress of the throne of England by the Act of Settlement of 1701, which decreed Roman Catholics could not accede to the throne. Sophia was at that time the senior eligible Protestant descendant of James I of England.
Initially a landless cadet, Ernest Augustus succeeded in having the House of Hanover raised to electoral dignity in 1692.

Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany

Duke of YorkDuke of York and AlbanyFrederick, Duke of York
Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany (r. 1764–1802), second son of George III
Prince Frederick Augustus, or the Duke of York as he became in later life, belonged to the House of Hanover.

Herrenhausen Palace

HerrenhausenSchloss Herrenhausen
His Herrenhausen Palace in Hanover had been completely destroyed during World War II. His eldest son, Prince Ernest Augustus, sold his remaining property at Herrenhausen Gardens in 1961, but kept the nearby Princely House, a small palace built in 1720 by George I for his daughter Anna Louise.
Herrenhausen Palace (German: Schloss Herrenhausen) is a former royal summer residence of the House of Hanover in the Herrenhausen district of the German city of Hanover.

Electorate of Brunswick-Lüneburg

HanoverHanoverianElectorate of Hanover
The house originated in 1635 as a cadet branch of the House of Brunswick-Lüneburg, growing in prestige until Hanover became an Electorate in 1692.
As part of the German Mediatisation of 25 February 1803, the Electorate received the Prince-Bishopric of Osnabrück in real union, whose every second ruler had been alternately members of the House of Hanover since 1662.

Ernest Augustus, Duke of Brunswick

Ernest AugustusErnest Augustus, Prince of Hanover and Duke of BrunswickErnst August
The 1866 rift between the House of Hanover and the House of Hohenzollern was settled only by the 1913 marriage of Princess Viktoria Luise of Prussia to Ernest Augustus, Duke of Brunswick, the last king's grandson.
This marriage ended the decades-long rift between the Houses of Hohenzollern and Hanover.

Princess Victoria Louise of Prussia

Victoria Louise of PrussiaPrincess Viktoria LuisePrincess Victoria Louise
The 1866 rift between the House of Hanover and the House of Hohenzollern was settled only by the 1913 marriage of Princess Viktoria Luise of Prussia to Ernest Augustus, Duke of Brunswick, the last king's grandson.
It was hailed in the press as the end of the rift between the House of Hanover and House of Hohenzollern that had existed since the 1866 annexation.

Free State of Brunswick

BrunswickBraunschweigBrunswickian
After having left Brunswick Palace, the duke and his family moved back to their exile seat Cumberland Castle at Gmunden, Austria, but in 1924 he received Blankenburg Castle and some other estates in a settlement with the Free State of Brunswick, and moved there in 1930.
From 1913 it was ruled by Duke Ernest Augustus of the House of Hanover.

Prince Ernest Augustus of Hanover (1914–1987)

Prince Ernest Augustus of HanoverErnest Augustus, Prince of HanoverPrince Ernest Augustus
His Herrenhausen Palace in Hanover had been completely destroyed during World War II. His eldest son, Prince Ernest Augustus, sold his remaining property at Herrenhausen Gardens in 1961, but kept the nearby Princely House, a small palace built in 1720 by George I for his daughter Anna Louise.
Ernst August, Hereditary Prince of Brunswick, Prince of Hanover (Ernst August Prinz von Hannover; 18 March 1914 – 9 December 1987) was head of the House of Hanover from 1953 until his death.

British prince

Prince of the United KingdomPrincePrince of Great Britain and Ireland
In 1914 the title of a Prince of Great Britain and Ireland was additionally granted to the members of the house by King George V.
After the accession of George I (the first monarch from the House of Hanover), it became customary for the sons of the sovereign and grandsons of the sovereign in the male line to be titled 'Prince' and styled His Royal Highness (abbreviated HRH). Great-grandsons of the sovereign were princes styled His Highness (abbreviated HH).

King of Hanover

HanoverKing
personal union). From 1814, when Hanover became a kingdom, the British monarch was also King of Hanover.
House of Hanover

Prince Ernst August of Hanover (born 1983)

Prince Ernst August of HanoverPrince Ernst AugustHereditary Prince Ernst August
It is now his grandson Ernest Augustus's private home, along with Marienburg Castle.
In 2004, his father signed over to him the German property of the House of Hanover, including Marienburg Castle and the agricultural estates of Calenberg Castle.

Ernest Augustus, Crown Prince of Hanover

Prince Ernest AugustusDuke of CumberlandCrown Prince Ernest Augustus of Hanover
By semi-Salic law, the House of Hanover would have acceded to the Duchy of Brunswick, but there had been strong Prussian pressure against having George V of Hanover or his son, the Duke of Cumberland, succeed to a member state of the German Empire, at least without strong conditions, including swearing to the German constitution.
Ernst August was the last Hanoverian prince to hold a British royal title and the Order of the Garter.

Herrenhausen Gardens

HerrenhausenHerrenhäuser Gärten, HanoverBerggarten
His Herrenhausen Palace in Hanover had been completely destroyed during World War II. His eldest son, Prince Ernest Augustus, sold his remaining property at Herrenhausen Gardens in 1961, but kept the nearby Princely House, a small palace built in 1720 by George I for his daughter Anna Louise.
It suffered immense damage during World War II (the Royal Air Force were requested by the British Royal Family not to attack the palace, at the time still owned by the House of Hanover, but in fact it was hit by bombs during an air raid in 1943).