Housing tenure

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Housing tenure refers to the financial arrangements under which someone has the right to live in a house or apartment.wikipedia
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Apartment

apartment buildingflatsflat
Housing tenure refers to the financial arrangements under which someone has the right to live in a house or apartment.
The housing tenure of apartments also varies considerably, from large-scale public housing, to owner occupancy within what is legally a condominium (strata title or commonhold), to tenants renting from a private landlord (see leasehold estate).

Public housing

social housinghousing projecthousing projects
In the case of tenancy, the landlord may be a private individual, a non-profit organization such as a housing association, or a government body, as in public housing.
Public housing is a form of housing tenure in which the property is owned by a government authority, which may be central or local.

Renting

rentrentedrental
The most frequent forms are tenancy, in which rent is paid to a landlord, and owner-occupancy.
Examples include letting out real estate (real property) for the purpose of housing tenure (where the tenant rents a residence to live in), parking space for a vehicle(s), storage space, whole or portions of properties for business, agricultural, institutional, or government use, or other reasons.

Owner-occupancy

home ownershipowner-occupierhomeowner
The most frequent forms are tenancy, in which rent is paid to a landlord, and owner-occupancy.
Owner-occupancy or home-ownership is a form of housing tenure where a person, called the owner-occupier, owner-occupant, or home owner, owns the home in which they live.

Housing cooperative

cooperative housingco-opcooperative
A housing cooperative, housing co-op, or housing company (especially in Finland ), is a legal entity, usually a cooperative or a corporation, which owns real estate, consisting of one or more residential buildings; it is one type of housing tenure.

House

housingdwellingsresidence
Housing tenure refers to the financial arrangements under which someone has the right to live in a house or apartment.

Land trust

trusttrust landtrusts
Individuals use land trusts as an alternative type of housing tenure to owner occupancy mainly for privacy and to avoid probate.

Home

domesticresidenceprivate residence
Apartments may be owned by an owner/occupier by leasehold tenure or rented by tenants (two types of housing tenure).

Leasehold estate

tenantsleaseholdtenant
The most frequent forms are tenancy, in which rent is paid to a landlord, and owner-occupancy.

Landlord

landlordslandladylicensed victualler
The most frequent forms are tenancy, in which rent is paid to a landlord, and owner-occupancy.

Mortgage law

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The basic forms of tenure can be subdivided, for example an owner-occupier may own a house outright, or it may be mortgaged.

Nonprofit organization

non-profitnon-profit organizationnonprofit
In the case of tenancy, the landlord may be a private individual, a non-profit organization such as a housing association, or a government body, as in public housing.

Housing association

housing associationsRegistered Social Landlordhousing trust
In the case of tenancy, the landlord may be a private individual, a non-profit organization such as a housing association, or a government body, as in public housing.

Survey methodology

surveysurveysstatistical survey
Surveys used in social science research frequently include questions about housing tenure, because it is a useful proxy for income or wealth, and people are less reluctant to give information about it.

Social science

social sciencessocial scientistsocial
Surveys used in social science research frequently include questions about housing tenure, because it is a useful proxy for income or wealth, and people are less reluctant to give information about it.

Proxy (statistics)

proxyproxiesproxy variable
Surveys used in social science research frequently include questions about housing tenure, because it is a useful proxy for income or wealth, and people are less reluctant to give information about it.

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