Hubei

Hubei ProvinceHupehHubei, ChinaCommunist Party SecretaryGovernorHupeiHu-peDeputy Secretary General of Hubei People's GovernmentEGovernor of Hubei
Hubei (formerly Hupeh) is a landlocked province in Central China.wikipedia
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Hunan

Hunan ProvinceHunan, ChinaHu-nan
It borders Henan to the north, Anhui to the east, Jiangxi to the southeast, Hunan to the south, Chongqing to the west, and Shaanxi to the northwest. Qin was succeeded by the Han dynasty in 206 BC, which established the province (zhou) of Jingzhou in what is now Hubei and Hunan.
Located in the middle reaches of the Yangtze watershed, it borders the province-level divisions of Hubei to the north, Jiangxi to the east, Guangdong and Guangxi to the south, Guizhou to the west, and Chongqing to the northwest.

Anhui

Anhui ProvinceAnhweiAnhui, China
It borders Henan to the north, Anhui to the east, Jiangxi to the southeast, Hunan to the south, Chongqing to the west, and Shaanxi to the northwest.
The province is located across the basins of the Yangtze River and the Huai River, bordering Jiangsu to the east, Zhejiang to the southeast, Jiangxi to the south, Hubei to the southwest, Henan to the northwest, and Shandong for a short section in the north.

Dongting Lake

Lake DongtingDongtingTungting Lake
The name of the province means "north of the lake", referring to its position north of Dongting Lake.
The provinces of Hubei and Hunan are named after their location relative to the lake: Hubei means "North of the Lake" and Hunan, "South of the Lake".

Jiangxi

Jiangxi ProvinceKiangsiJiangsi
It borders Henan to the north, Anhui to the east, Jiangxi to the southeast, Hunan to the south, Chongqing to the west, and Shaanxi to the northwest.
Spanning from the banks of the Yangtze river in the north into hillier areas in the south and east, it shares a border with Anhui to the north, Zhejiang to the northeast, Fujian to the east, Guangdong to the south, Hunan to the west, and Hubei to the northwest.

Central China

Centralcentral partCentral Region
Hubei (formerly Hupeh) is a landlocked province in Central China.
Central China is a geographical and a loosely defined cultural region that includes the provinces of Henan, Hubei and Hunan.

Shaanxi

Shaanxi ProvinceShensiShǎnxī
It borders Henan to the north, Anhui to the east, Jiangxi to the southeast, Hunan to the south, Chongqing to the west, and Shaanxi to the northwest. During the Warring States period (475–221 BC) Chu became the major adversary of the upstart State of Qin to the northwest (in what is now Shaanxi province), which began to assert itself by outward expansionism.
It lies in central China, bordering the provinces of Shanxi (NE, E), Henan (E), Hubei (SE), Chongqing (S), Sichuan (SW), Gansu (W), Ningxia (NW), and Inner Mongolia (N).

Yichang

IchangYichang CityYichang, Hubei
The high-profile Three Gorges Dam is located at Yichang, in the west of the province.
Yichang is a prefecture-level city located in western Hubei province, China.

Henan

Henan ProvinceHenan, ChinaHonan
It borders Henan to the north, Anhui to the east, Jiangxi to the southeast, Hunan to the south, Chongqing to the west, and Shaanxi to the northwest.
Its neighboring provinces are Shaanxi, Shanxi, Hebei, Shandong, Anhui and Hubei.

Three Gorges Dam

Three GorgesThree Gorges ProjectChina
The high-profile Three Gorges Dam is located at Yichang, in the west of the province.
The Three Gorges Dam is a hydroelectric gravity dam that spans the Yangtze River by the town of Sandouping, in Yiling District, Yichang, Hubei province, China.

E (state)

EState of EE state
Hubei is officially abbreviated to "undefined", an ancient name associated with the eastern part of the province since the State of E of the Western Zhou dynasty, while a popular name for Hubei is "undefined" (Chǔ), after the powerful State of Chu that existed in the area during the Eastern Zhou dynasty.
The State of E (IPA:/ɤ̂/), whose Middle and Old Chinese name has been reconstructed as Ngak (IPA:/ŋˤak/), was an ancient Chinese state in the area of present-day Henan and Hubei in China from around the 12th century BCE until its overthrow in 863 BCE.

Wuhan

Wuhan, ChinaWuhan, HubeiWuchang Shipyard
The provincial capital is Wuhan, a major transportation thoroughfare and the political, cultural, and economic hub of Central China. The Qing dynasty, however, continued to maintain a Viceroy of Huguang, one of the most well-known being Zhang Zhidong, whose modernizing reforms made Hubei (especially Wuhan) into a prosperous center of commerce and industry.
Wuhan is the capital and largest city of the Chinese province of Hubei.

Yangtze

Yangtze RiverYangzi RiverChangjiang
Chu was nominally a tributary state of the Zhou dynasty, and it was itself an extension of the Chinese civilization that had emerged some centuries before in the north; but it was also a culturally unique blend of northern and southern culture, and was a powerful state that held onto much of the middle and lower Yangtze River, with power extending northwards into the North China Plain.
In Hubei Province, the river is also called the Jing Jiang or the "Jing River" after Jingzhou.

Liu Bei

Lau Beifirst emperor of ShuLiu
After his death, Liu Biao's realm was surrendered by his successors to Cao Cao, a powerful warlord who had conquered nearly all of north China; but in the Battle of Red Cliffs, warlords Liu Bei and Sun Quan drove Cao Cao out of Jingzhou.
Liu Bei overcame his many defeats to carve out his own realm, which at its peak spanned present-day Sichuan, Chongqing, Guizhou, Hunan, and parts of Hubei and Gansu.

Liu Biao

Lady CaiLady ChoiLau Biu
Towards the end of the Han dynasty in the beginning of the 3rd century, Jingzhou was ruled by regional warlord Liu Biao.
He is best known for serving as the Governor of Jing Province (covering present-day Hubei and Hunan) from 192 until his death in 208.

Jingzhou (ancient China)

Jing ProvinceJingzhouJing
Qin was succeeded by the Han dynasty in 206 BC, which established the province (zhou) of Jingzhou in what is now Hubei and Hunan.
It usually corresponded with the modern-day provinces of Hubei and Hunan until the Sui dynasty, after which it referred to the city of Jingzhou.

Chongqing

ChungkingChongqing MunicipalityChongqing, China
It borders Henan to the north, Anhui to the east, Jiangxi to the southeast, Hunan to the south, Chongqing to the west, and Shaanxi to the northwest.
It borders the following provinces: Hubei in the east, Hunan in the southeast, Guizhou in the south, Sichuan in the west and northwest, and Shaanxi to the north in its northeast corner.

Eastern Wu

WuKingdom of WuWu Kingdom
Liu Bei then took control of Jingzhou; he went on to conquer Yizhou (the Sichuan Basin), but lost Jingzhou to Sun Quan; for the next few decades Jingzhou was controlled by the Wu Kingdom, ruled by Sun Quan and his successors.
During its existence, Wu's capital was at Jianye (present-day Nanjing, Jiangsu), but at times it was also at Wuchang (武昌; present-day Ezhou, Hubei).

Spring and Autumn period

Spring and AutumnChunqiuthe Spring and Autumn period
By the Spring and Autumn period (770–476 BC), the territory of today's Hubei was part of the powerful State of Chu.

Battle of Red Cliffs

Battle of ChibiRed CliffsBattle of Chi Bi
After his death, Liu Biao's realm was surrendered by his successors to Cao Cao, a powerful warlord who had conquered nearly all of north China; but in the Battle of Red Cliffs, warlords Liu Bei and Sun Quan drove Cao Cao out of Jingzhou.
The Yangtze River in the area of Jing Province (covering present-day Hubei and Hunan provinces) was key to the success of this strategy.

Viceroy of Huguang

HuguangGovernor-general of Huguangviceroy
The Qing dynasty, however, continued to maintain a Viceroy of Huguang, one of the most well-known being Zhang Zhidong, whose modernizing reforms made Hubei (especially Wuhan) into a prosperous center of commerce and industry.
The Viceroy of Huguang had jurisdiction over Hubei and Hunan provinces, which were previously a single province called "Huguang Province" in the Ming dynasty, hence the name "Huguang".

Huangshi

DayeCity of HuangshiHuangshi County
The Huangshi/Daye area, south-east of Wuhan, became an important center of mining and metallurgy.
Huangshi is a prefecture-level city in southeastern Hubei province, People's Republic of China.

Daye

Daye CountyDaye CityCity of Daye
The Huangshi/Daye area, south-east of Wuhan, became an important center of mining and metallurgy.
Daye is a county-level city in eastern Hubei province, China.

Wuchang Uprising

uprising in Wuchang1911 revolution1911 revolution in China
In 1911 the Wuchang Uprising took place in modern-day Wuhan, overthrowing the Qing dynasty and establishing the Republic of China.
The Wuchang Uprising was an armed rebellion against the ruling Qing dynasty that took place in Wuchang (now Wuchang District of Wuhan), Hubei, China on October 10, 1911, which was the beginning of the Xinhai Revolution that successfully overthrew China's last imperial dynasty.

Xianning

Tongcheng (通城), HubeiCity of XianningHsien-ning
As the fears of a nuclear war increased during the time of Sino-Soviet border conflicts in the late 1960s, the Xianning prefecture of Hubei was chosen as the site of Project 131, an underground military command headquarters.
Xianning is a prefecture-level city in southeastern Hubei province, People's Republic of China, bordering Jiangxi to the southeast and Hunan to the southwest.

Qin (state)

QinState of QinQin state
During the Warring States period (475–221 BC) Chu became the major adversary of the upstart State of Qin to the northwest (in what is now Shaanxi province), which began to assert itself by outward expansionism.
In the meantime, Qin launched several attacks on Chu and eventually sacked the Chu capital city of Chen (陳; present-day Jiangling County, Hubei province).