Hughes Aircraft Company

Hughes AircraftHughesHughes Space and CommunicationsHughes Aircraft CorporationHughes Space and Communications CompanyHughes AerospaceHughes Aircraft Co.Hughes Missile SystemsHoward Hughes Aircraft Companyaviation
The Hughes Aircraft Company was a major American aerospace and defense contractor founded in 1932 by Howard Hughes in Glendale, California as a division of Hughes Tool Company.wikipedia
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Howard Hughes

Howard Robard Hughes, Jr.Howard R. HughesHughes
The Hughes Aircraft Company was a major American aerospace and defense contractor founded in 1932 by Howard Hughes in Glendale, California as a division of Hughes Tool Company.
Hughes formed the Hughes Aircraft Company in 1932, hiring numerous engineers and designers.

Hughes Electronics

HughesHughes Electronics CorporationHughes Electronics Corp.
Hughes Aircraft was acquired by General Motors from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in 1985 and was put under the umbrella of Hughes Electronics, now known as DirecTV, until GM sold its assets to Raytheon in 1997.
Hughes Electronics Corporation was formed in 1985 when Hughes Aircraft was sold by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute to General Motors for $5.2 billion.

Hughes H-4 Hercules

Spruce GooseH-4 HerculesHughes H-4
The company was known for producing, among other products, the Hughes H-4 Hercules Spruce Goose aircraft, the atmospheric entry probe carried by the Galileo spacecraft, and the AIM-4 Falcon guided missile. These included the famous Hughes H-4 Hercules, better known by the public's nickname for it, the Spruce Goose, the H-1 racer, D-2, and the XF-11.
The Hughes H-4 Hercules (also known as the Spruce Goose; registration NX37602) is a prototype strategic airlift flying boat designed and built by the Hughes Aircraft Company.

DirecTV

Direct TVDirectTVDirecTV Sports
Hughes Aircraft was acquired by General Motors from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in 1985 and was put under the umbrella of Hughes Electronics, now known as DirecTV, until GM sold its assets to Raytheon in 1997.
In 1953, Howard Hughes created the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), to which he transferred full ownership of Hughes Aircraft.

AIM-4 Falcon

FalconHughes FalconFalcon missile
The company was known for producing, among other products, the Hughes H-4 Hercules Spruce Goose aircraft, the atmospheric entry probe carried by the Galileo spacecraft, and the AIM-4 Falcon guided missile.
Hughes Aircraft was awarded a contract for a subsonic missile under the project designation MX-798, which soon gave way to the supersonic MX-904 in 1947.

Hughes Tool Company

Sharp-Hughes Tool CompanyHughes ToolHughes Tool Company Ltd
The Hughes Aircraft Company was a major American aerospace and defense contractor founded in 1932 by Howard Hughes in Glendale, California as a division of Hughes Tool Company.
In 1932, Hughes formed Hughes Aircraft Company as a division of the Hughes Tool Company.

Hughes XF-11

XF-11calamitous plane wreckF-11
These included the famous Hughes H-4 Hercules, better known by the public's nickname for it, the Spruce Goose, the H-1 racer, D-2, and the XF-11.
The Hughes XF-11 was a prototype military reconnaissance aircraft, designed and flown by Howard Hughes and built by Hughes Aircraft for the United States Army Air Forces.

Playa Vista, Los Angeles

Playa VistaPlaya Vista, CaliforniaPlaya Vista, Los Angeles, California
However the plant's hangars at Hughes Airport, location of present-day Playa Vista in the Westside of Los Angeles, California, were primarily used as a branch plant for the construction of other companies' designs.
The area was the headquarters of Hughes Aircraft Company from 1941 to 1985 and the site of the construction of the Hughes H-4 Hercules "Spruce Goose" aircraft.

Hughes Airport (California)

Hughes AirportHughesHughes Aircraft Plant,
During World War II the company designed and built several prototype aircraft at Hughes Airport.
The Hughes Airport was a private airport owned by Howard Hughes for the Hughes Aircraft Company.

Galileo (spacecraft)

GalileoGalileo spacecraftGalileo'' spacecraft
The company was known for producing, among other products, the Hughes H-4 Hercules Spruce Goose aircraft, the atmospheric entry probe carried by the Galileo spacecraft, and the AIM-4 Falcon guided missile.
NASA's Ames Research Center managed the atmospheric probe, which was built by Hughes Aircraft Company.

Los Angeles

Los Angeles, CaliforniaLos Angeles, CALos Angeles, United States
However the plant's hangars at Hughes Airport, location of present-day Playa Vista in the Westside of Los Angeles, California, were primarily used as a branch plant for the construction of other companies' designs.
Calship built hundreds of Liberty Ships and Victory Ships on Terminal Island, and the Los Angeles area was the headquarters of six of the country's major aircraft manufacturers (Douglas Aircraft Company, Hughes Aircraft, Lockheed, North American Aviation, Northrop Corporation, and Vultee).

Harold L. George

Harold GeorgeHarold Lee George
The company then expanded into the booming electronics field, eventually employing 3,300 Ph.D.s. Hughes hired Ira Eaker, Harold L. George, and Tex Thornton to run the company.
Following the war, he helped Hughes Aircraft become a very profitable company, and was twice elected mayor of Beverly Hills, California.

Raytheon

Raytheon CompanySubmarine Signal CompanyRaytheon Corporation
Hughes Aircraft was acquired by General Motors from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in 1985 and was put under the umbrella of Hughes Electronics, now known as DirecTV, until GM sold its assets to Raytheon in 1997.
Also in 1997, Raytheon acquired the aerospace and defense business of Hughes Aircraft Company from Hughes Electronics Corporation, a subsidiary of General Motors, which included a number of product lines previously purchased by Hughes Electronics, including the former General Dynamics missile business (Pomona facility), the defense portion of Delco Electronics (Delco Systems Operations), and Magnavox Electronic Systems.

Simon Ramo

Ramo, SimonRamo-Wooldridge CorporationRamo-Woolridge Corporation
Two Hughes engineers, Simon Ramo and Dean Wooldridge, had new ideas on the packaging of electronics to make complete fire control systems.
In 1946 he returned to California to become director of research for the electronics department of Hughes Aircraft, and his career became coupled with that of Dean Wooldridge.

TRW Inc.

TRWRamo-WooldridgeRamo-Wooldridge Corporation
Ramo and Wooldridge, having failed to reach an agreement with Howard Hughes regarding management problems, resigned in September 1953 and founded the Ramo-Wooldridge Corporation, later to join Thompson Products to form the Thompson-Ramo-Wooldridge based in Canoga Park, with Hughes leasing space for nuclear research programs (present day West Hills (Canoga Park).
In 1950, Simon Ramo and Dean Wooldridge while working for Hughes Aircraft, led the development of the Falcon radar-guided missile, among other projects.

Lawrence A. Hyland

Hyland, Lawrence A.L.A. "Pat" Hyland
The next year, L.A. "Pat" Hyland was hired as vice president and general manager of Hughes Aircraft; he would ultimately become company president and CEO after Howard Hughes' death in 1976.
He is one of three individuals, with whom are credited in major contributions to the invention of radar, but is probably best known as the man who transformed Hughes Aircraft from Howard Hughes' aviation "hobby shop" into one of the world's leading technology companies.

Gregory Jarvis

Greg JarvisGregory B. JarvisGregory Bruce Jarvis
Greg Jarvis and Ronald McNair, two of the astronauts on the last flight of the Space Shuttle Challenger, were Hughes alumni.
Gregory Bruce Jarvis (August 24, 1944 – January 28, 1986) was an American engineer who died during the destruction of the Space Shuttle Challenger on mission STS-51-L, where he was serving as payload specialist for Hughes Aircraft.

Tex Thornton

Charles B. "Tex" ThorntonCharles Bates "Tex" ThorntonCharles B. Thornton
The company then expanded into the booming electronics field, eventually employing 3,300 Ph.D.s. Hughes hired Ira Eaker, Harold L. George, and Tex Thornton to run the company.
Thornton left Ford in 1948 to work for Hughes Aircraft.

Syncom

Syncom 3Syncom 2Syncom 1
Hughes Space and Communications Group and the Hughes Space Systems Division built the world's first geosynchronous communications satellite, Syncom, in 1963 and followed by the first geosynchronous weather satellite, ATS-1, in 1966.
The three early Syncom satellites were experimental spacecraft built by Hughes Aircraft Company's facility in Culver City, California, by a team led by Harold Rosen, Don Williams, and Thomas Hudspeth.

Galileo Probe

GalileoGalileo'' probeGalileo space probe
Hughes also built Pioneer Venus in 1978, which performed the first extensive radar mapping of Venus, and the Galileo probe that flew to Jupiter in the 1990s.
The 339 kg probe was built by Hughes Aircraft Company at its El Segundo, California plant, and measured about 1.3 m across.

Aerospace manufacturer

aerospace industryAerospaceaircraft industry
The Hughes Aircraft Company was a major American aerospace and defense contractor founded in 1932 by Howard Hughes in Glendale, California as a division of Hughes Tool Company.
Raytheon acquired Hughes Aircraft Company for $9.5 billion in 1997.

Canoga Park, Los Angeles

Canoga ParkCanoga Park, CaliforniaCanoga Park, Los Angeles, California
Ramo and Wooldridge, having failed to reach an agreement with Howard Hughes regarding management problems, resigned in September 1953 and founded the Ramo-Wooldridge Corporation, later to join Thompson Products to form the Thompson-Ramo-Wooldridge based in Canoga Park, with Hughes leasing space for nuclear research programs (present day West Hills (Canoga Park).
Other aerospace companies followed: including Atomics International, Thompson Ramo Wooldridge-TRW, Hughes Aircraft, Rockwell International, Boeing, and Teledyne.

Communications satellite

satellite communicationssatellitecommunication satellite
Hughes Space and Communications Group and the Hughes Space Systems Division built the world's first geosynchronous communications satellite, Syncom, in 1963 and followed by the first geosynchronous weather satellite, ATS-1, in 1966.
An immediate antecedent of the geostationary satellites was the Hughes Aircraft Company's Syncom 2, launched on July 26, 1963.

Fullerton, California

FullertonFullerton, CACity of Fullerton
Hughes Aircraft Ground Systems Group was located in Fullerton, California.
The 293 acre Hughes Aircraft Company's Ground Systems Group campus in western Fullerton was redeveloped into a major new residential and commercial district, called Amerige Heights, in 2001–2004.

Tucson, Arizona

TucsonTucson, AZTucson, Arizona Territory
In 1951 Hughes Aircraft Co. built a missile plant in Tucson, Arizona.
Raytheon Missile Systems (formerly Hughes Aircraft Co.), Texas Instruments, IBM, Intuit Inc., Universal Avionics, Honeywell Aerospace, Sunquest Information Systems, Sanofi-Aventis, Ventana Medical Systems, Inc., and Bombardier Aerospace all have a significant presence in Tucson.