A report on Huichol

Huichol women and children
Location of the Huichols in western Mexico
A Nayarit tomb figure in the permanent collection of The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.
Photo of Huichol woman and child.
Representation of the god Kauyumari (Blue Deer)
Altar of the dead in wixarika school.
Lophophora williamsii pm 2
Huichol yarn painting
This blue beaded Huichol art bear depicts symbols of peyote, scorpion, and corn.
Wixarika artist with a big lion sculpture covered with crystal beads in Arte Marakame gallery.
Huichol mara'akame (shaman).

Indigenous people of Mexico and the United States living in the Sierra Madre Occidental range in the states of Nayarit, Jalisco, Zacatecas, and Durango, as well as in the United States in the states of California, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas.

- Huichol
Huichol women and children

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Jalisco

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One of the 31 states which, along with Mexico City, comprise the 32 Federal Entities of Mexico.

One of the 31 states which, along with Mexico City, comprise the 32 Federal Entities of Mexico.

Along the shore of Lake Chapala
Near the Primavera Forest
View of a sunny day near Mascota, Jalisco in January
A Wixárika man making a beaded jaguar head
Regions of Jalisco
Four physiographic regions of Jalisco
View of Mascota, Jalisco
Figure; 2nd century; ceramic; height: 7.9 cm (3 in.); Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York City)
Cristóbal de Olid leads Spanish soldiers with Tlaxcalan allies in the conquests of Jalisco, 1522. From Lienzo de Tlaxcala.
Painting of Prisciliano Sánchez, first governor of the state
View of Puerto Vallarta
Colorful painted egg shells, filled with confetti, handmade by village children and used to celebrate the most important traditions of Ajijic, Jalisco.
Typical Mariachi of Jalisco.
Akron Stadium
Chivas banner at a game
Parroquia de Santiago Apostol, in Tequila
Parroquia de San Antonio, in Tapalpa
Parroquia de Nuestra Señora de la Asuncion, en Lagos de Moreno
Parroquia de San Miguel Arcangel in San Miguel el Alto
Guadalajara Cathedral
Parroquia de San Francisco in Tepatitlán de Morelos
Catedral Basílica de Nuestra Señora de San Juan de los Lagos in San Juan de los Lagos, 2nd most visited religious center in the country
Basilica of Our Lady of Zapopan, in Zapopan
Basilica de Nuestra Señora del Rosario, in Talpa de Allende
Parroquia de Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe, in Puerto Vallarta

The state is home to two significant indigenous populations, the Huichols and the Nahuas.

Nayarit

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One of the 31 states that, along with Mexico City, comprise the Federal Entities of Mexico.

One of the 31 states that, along with Mexico City, comprise the Federal Entities of Mexico.

Map of Nayarit before the Spanish Conquest of the Aztec Empire
The colonial contaduría (accounting offices) in the old port town of San Blas
Sayulita on Nayarit's Pacific coast, a former fishing village now mostly given over to tourism, part of the area now marketed as "La Riviera Nayarit"
Archeological zone of Los Toriles
The state capital, Tepic, seen from the Cerro de la Cruz. Tepic is home to some 340,000 people.
Shrimp fisherman on the coast of Nayarit

Home to Uto-Aztecan indigenous peoples such as the Huichol and Cora, the region was exposed to the conquistadores, Hernán Cortés and Nuño de Guzmán, in the 16th century.

Men at Wirikuta

Wirikuta

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Men at Wirikuta

Wirikuta is a desert, sacred to the Wixárika (Huichol) Indians high in the mountains of central Mexico, between the Sierra Madre Oriental and the Zacatecas ranges, near Real de Catorce.

San Andrés Cohamiata

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San Andrés Cohamiata is an autonomously governed Wixárika (Huichol) village located in Mezquitic, Jalisco, Mexico.

Durango

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One of the 31 states which make up the 32 Federal Entities of Mexico, situated in the northwest of the country.

One of the 31 states which make up the 32 Federal Entities of Mexico, situated in the northwest of the country.

View toward the canyon at the Mexiquillo (es) nature reserve.
Desert tortoise in the Mapimí Biosphere Reserve
El Picacho in the Valleys region of the state
Mexicaneros during Candlemas celebrations in San Pedro Jícaras
Small Tepehuan carrying bag in traditional design
Azatlan-style pottery at the Durango City Archeological Museum.
Captain Francisco de Ibarra
Catedral basílica de Victoria de Durango
Photo of Gen. Pancho Villa and his wife, Sra. María Luz Corral de Villa (1914)

Cerro Gordo is the highest point in the state and is considered sacred to both the Tepehuanes and the Huichol people.

A group of Cora people photographed by Carl Sofus Lumholtz in 1896.

Cora people

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Indigenous ethnic group of North Western Mexico which live in the municipality El Nayar, Rosamorada, Ruiz, Tepic, Mezquital Durango in the Mexican state of Nayarit and in a few settlements in the neighboring state of Jalisco.

Indigenous ethnic group of North Western Mexico which live in the municipality El Nayar, Rosamorada, Ruiz, Tepic, Mezquital Durango in the Mexican state of Nayarit and in a few settlements in the neighboring state of Jalisco.

A group of Cora people photographed by Carl Sofus Lumholtz in 1896.
location of the Cora territory in present-day Mexico
Manniquen of a masked Cora "Judas" dancer at the Museo Nacional de la Máscara.

Others are shared with the geographically and linguistically adjacent Huichol; for example, the myth of the human race being the offspring of a man and a dog-woman who were the only survivors of a mythical cataclysmic deluge.

Real de Catorce

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Village in the Mexican state of San Luis Potosí and the seat of the municipality of Catorce.

Village in the Mexican state of San Luis Potosí and the seat of the municipality of Catorce.

View of Real de Catorce from the hill behind the town center
Templo de la Purisima Concepcion, a parish church containing a reputedly miraculous image of St. Francis
Huichol women in the Plaza Hidalgo
Calle Constitución, the town's main street
The eastern facing tunnel entrance to Real de Catorce

Real de Catorce has long been a pilgrimage site for both local Catholics and Huichol shamanists, and is now being discovered by international tourists drawn by the desert ambience and reputed spiritual energy.

Copper Canyon in Chihuahua, Mexico

Sierra Madre Occidental

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Major mountain range system of the North American Cordillera, that runs northwest–southeast through northwestern and western Mexico, and along the Gulf of California.

Major mountain range system of the North American Cordillera, that runs northwest–southeast through northwestern and western Mexico, and along the Gulf of California.

Copper Canyon in Chihuahua, Mexico
Basaseachic Falls
The Rio Santiago
The Durango Volcanic field
An example of the ignimbrite units
Sierra Madre Occidental pine-oak forests
An early picture of Tarahumara
Pancho Villa

The mountains are home to several indigenous nations speaking Uto-Aztecan languages, including the Tarahumara in the central portion of the range, the Huichol in the southern part of the range, and the Tepehuanes in the eastern slopes.

Huichol language

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Indigenous language of Mexico which belongs to the Uto-Aztecan language family.

Indigenous language of Mexico which belongs to the Uto-Aztecan language family.

It is spoken by the ethnic group widely known as the Huichol (self-designation Wixaritari), whose mountainous territory extends over portions of the Mexican states of Jalisco, San Luis Potosí, Nayarit, Zacatecas, and Durango, mostly in Jalisco.

Mezquitic

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Municipality in the north of the state of Jalisco, Mexico.

Municipality in the north of the state of Jalisco, Mexico.

The municipality includes a number of autonomously governed Wixárika (Huichol) communities, including San Andrés Cohamiata.