Human Trafficking Prevention Act

Human Trafficking Prevention Act (H.R. 4449; 113th Congress)
The Human Trafficking Prevention Act is a bill that would require regular training and briefings for some federal government personnel to raise awareness of human trafficking and help employees spot cases of it.wikipedia
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Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000

Trafficking Victims Protection ActVictims of Trafficking and Violence Protection ActTrafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000
The Human Trafficking Prevention Act would amend the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 to require training for federal government personnel related to trafficking in persons to include at a minimum: (1) a distance learning course on trafficking-in-persons issues and the Department of State's obligations under the Act, targeted for embassy reporting officers, regional bureaus' trafficking-in-persons coordinators, and their superiors; (2) specific trafficking-in-persons briefings for all ambassadors and deputy chiefs of mission before they depart for their posts; and (3) at least annual reminders to all such personnel and other federal personnel at each diplomatic or consular post of the Department of State located outside the United States of key problems, threats, methods, and warning signs of trafficking in persons specific to the country or jurisdiction in which each such post is located, and appropriate procedures to report information acquired about possible trafficking cases.

Sean Patrick Maloney

Sean MaloneyMaloneyRep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D, NY-18)
The Human Trafficking Prevention Act was introduced into the United States House of Representatives on April 10, 2014 by Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D, NY-18).
On April 10, 2014, Maloney introduced the Human Trafficking Prevention Act (H.R. 4449; 113th Congress), a bill that would require regular training and briefings for some federal government personnel to raise awareness of human trafficking and help employees spot cases of it.

United States House of Representatives

U.S. RepresentativeU.S. House of RepresentativesUnited States Representative
The Human Trafficking Prevention Act was introduced into the United States House of Representatives on April 10, 2014 by Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D, NY-18). The bill was introduced in the United States House of Representatives during the 113th United States Congress.

Immigration to the United States

immigrationimmigrantsimmigrant
In the U.S., human trafficking tends to occur around international travel-hubs with large immigrant populations, notably California and Texas.

United States Department of State

State DepartmentU.S. State DepartmentDepartment of State
The Human Trafficking Prevention Act would amend the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 to require training for federal government personnel related to trafficking in persons to include at a minimum: (1) a distance learning course on trafficking-in-persons issues and the Department of State's obligations under the Act, targeted for embassy reporting officers, regional bureaus' trafficking-in-persons coordinators, and their superiors; (2) specific trafficking-in-persons briefings for all ambassadors and deputy chiefs of mission before they depart for their posts; and (3) at least annual reminders to all such personnel and other federal personnel at each diplomatic or consular post of the Department of State located outside the United States of key problems, threats, methods, and warning signs of trafficking in persons specific to the country or jurisdiction in which each such post is located, and appropriate procedures to report information acquired about possible trafficking cases. The United States Department of State has also estimated that between 14,000-17,500 people annually are trafficked for sex, labor, or other types of exploitation into the United States. The primary federal agencies affected—the Departments of State, Homeland Security, Health and Human Services, Labor, and Justice, as well as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission—have existing programs to train employees.

Congressional Research Service

U.S. Congressional Research ServiceCRSCongressional Research Service Report
This summary is based largely on the summary provided by the Congressional Research Service, a public domain source.

Public domain

public domain resourcepublic-domainPD
This summary is based largely on the summary provided by the Congressional Research Service, a public domain source.

Human trafficking

traffickingtrafficking in personstrafficked
The Human Trafficking Prevention Act would amend the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 to require training for federal government personnel related to trafficking in persons to include at a minimum: (1) a distance learning course on trafficking-in-persons issues and the Department of State's obligations under the Act, targeted for embassy reporting officers, regional bureaus' trafficking-in-persons coordinators, and their superiors; (2) specific trafficking-in-persons briefings for all ambassadors and deputy chiefs of mission before they depart for their posts; and (3) at least annual reminders to all such personnel and other federal personnel at each diplomatic or consular post of the Department of State located outside the United States of key problems, threats, methods, and warning signs of trafficking in persons specific to the country or jurisdiction in which each such post is located, and appropriate procedures to report information acquired about possible trafficking cases.

Congressional Budget Office

CBOU.S. Congressional Budget OfficeCongressional Budget Office (CBO)
''This summary is based largely on the summary provided by the Congressional Budget Office, as ordered reported by the House Committee on Foreign Affairs on May 29, 2014.

United States Department of Homeland Security

Department of Homeland SecurityU.S. Department of Homeland SecurityHomeland Security
The primary federal agencies affected—the Departments of State, Homeland Security, Health and Human Services, Labor, and Justice, as well as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission—have existing programs to train employees.

United States Department of Health and Human Services

Department of Health and Human ServicesU.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesHealth and Human Services
The primary federal agencies affected—the Departments of State, Homeland Security, Health and Human Services, Labor, and Justice, as well as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission—have existing programs to train employees.

United States Department of Labor

U.S. Department of LaborDepartment of LaborUS Department of Labor
The primary federal agencies affected—the Departments of State, Homeland Security, Health and Human Services, Labor, and Justice, as well as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission—have existing programs to train employees.

United States Department of Justice

Department of JusticeU.S. Department of JusticeJustice Department
The primary federal agencies affected—the Departments of State, Homeland Security, Health and Human Services, Labor, and Justice, as well as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission—have existing programs to train employees.

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

EEOCU.S. Equal Employment Opportunity CommissionUnited States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
The primary federal agencies affected—the Departments of State, Homeland Security, Health and Human Services, Labor, and Justice, as well as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission—have existing programs to train employees.

Appropriations bill (United States)

appropriationsappropriations billappropriation
CBO estimates that implementing the bill would cost less than $500,000 over the 2015-2019 period; those costs would be subject to the availability of appropriated funds.

PAYGO

pay-as-you-gopay as you goPay-as-you-go procedures
Enacting the bill would not affect direct spending or revenues; therefore, pay-as-you-go procedures do not apply.

United States House Committee on Foreign Affairs

Foreign AffairsHouse Foreign Affairs CommitteeCommittee on Foreign Affairs
It was referred to the United States House Committee on Foreign Affairs.

Voice vote

viva voceviva voce votevoice voting
On July 23, 2014 the House voted to pass the bill with a voice vote.

Eliot Engel

Eliot L. EngelCongressman Eliot EngelEliot L. Engel,
Rep. Eliot Engel (D-NY) supported the bill, saying that "One of the best ways to stop this crime is to ensure that people know if when they see it."

Ed Royce

Edward RoyceEdward R. RoyceRep. Edward R. Royce (R, CA-39)
Rep. Ed Royce (R-CA) said that "this bill ensures that US personnel overseas are properly equipped to perceive and combat the scourge of human trafficking. Though current law requires State Department personnel be trained to identify trafficking victims, it does not define minimum training requirements. This bill does that."