Human leg

leglegslower limbbroken leglower leglower limbslower extremitieslower extremitycrusbroke his leg
The human leg, in the general word sense, is the entire lower limb of the human body, including the foot, thigh and even the hip or gluteal region.wikipedia
552 Related Articles

Human body

bodyhuman anatomyhuman physiology
The human leg, in the general word sense, is the entire lower limb of the human body, including the foot, thigh and even the hip or gluteal region. However, the definition in human anatomy refers only to the section of the lower limb extending from the knee to the ankle, also known as the crus.
It comprises a head, neck, trunk (which includes the thorax and abdomen), arms and hands, legs and feet.

Thigh

thighsmedial thighmid-thighs
The human leg, in the general word sense, is the entire lower limb of the human body, including the foot, thigh and even the hip or gluteal region.
Anatomically, it is part of the lower limb.

Knee

knee injuryknee jointknees
However, the definition in human anatomy refers only to the section of the lower limb extending from the knee to the ankle, also known as the crus. This line stretches from the hip joint (or more precisely the head of the femur), through the knee joint (the intercondylar eminence of the tibia), and down to the center of the ankle (the ankle mortise, the fork-like grip between the medial and lateral malleoli). Legs are used for standing, and all forms of locomotion including recreational such as dancing, and constitute a significant portion of a person's mass. Female legs generally have greater hip anteversion and tibiofemoral angles, but shorter femur and tibial lengths than those in males.
In humans and other primates, the knee joins the thigh with the leg and consists of two joints: one between the femur and tibia (tibiofemoral joint), and one between the femur and patella (patellofemoral joint).

Genu valgum

knock-kneedknock kneesgenu valgum'' (knock knee)
Divergence from the normal femorotibial angle is called genu varum if the center of the knee joint is lateral to the mechanical axis (intermalleolar distance exceeds 3 cm), and genu valgum if it is medial to the mechanical axis (intercondylar distance exceeds 5 cm).
Genu valgum, commonly called "knock-knee", is a condition in which the knees angle in and touch each other when the legs are straightened.

Limb (anatomy)

limblimbsextremities
The human leg, in the general word sense, is the entire lower limb of the human body, including the foot, thigh and even the hip or gluteal region.
In the human body, the upper and lower limbs are commonly called the arms and the legs, respectively.

Genu varum

bow-leggedbow-leggednessbowlegged
Divergence from the normal femorotibial angle is called genu varum if the center of the knee joint is lateral to the mechanical axis (intermalleolar distance exceeds 3 cm), and genu valgum if it is medial to the mechanical axis (intercondylar distance exceeds 5 cm).
Genu varum (also called bow-leggedness, bandiness, bandy-leg, and tibia vara), is a varus deformity marked by (outward) bowing at the knee, which means that the lower leg is angled inward (medially) in relation to the thigh's axis, giving the limb overall the appearance of an archer's bow.

Piriformis muscle

piriformis
The piriformis originates on the anterior pelvic surface of the sacrum, passes through the greater sciatic foramen, and inserts on the posterior aspect of the tip of the greater trochanter.
The piriformis is a muscle in the gluteal region of the lower limbs.

Iliacus muscle

iliacus
The iliacus originates on the iliac fossa on the interior side of the pelvis.
It forms the lateral portion of iliopsoas, providing flexion of the thigh and lower limb at the acetabulofemoral joint.

Fibula

fibulaehead of the fibulahead of fibula
The calf is the back portion, and the tibia or shinbone together with the smaller fibula make up the front of the lower leg.
The fibula or calf bone is a leg bone located on the lateral side of the tibia, with which it is connected above and below.

Intercondylar area

intercondylar eminencePosterior intercondyloid fossaAnterior intercondyloid fossa
This line stretches from the hip joint (or more precisely the head of the femur), through the knee joint (the intercondylar eminence of the tibia), and down to the center of the ankle (the ankle mortise, the fork-like grip between the medial and lateral malleoli).
The anterior intercondylar area (or anterior intercondyloid fossa) is an area on the tibia, a bone in the lower leg.

Tibialis posterior muscle

tibialis posteriorTibialis posterior tendonPosterior tibial tendon rupture
In the deep layer, the tibialis posterior has its origin on the interosseus membrane and the neighbouring bone areas and runs down behind the medial malleolus.
It is the key stabilizing muscle of the lower leg.

Ankle

ankle jointanklesankle-joint
However, the definition in human anatomy refers only to the section of the lower limb extending from the knee to the ankle, also known as the crus. This line stretches from the hip joint (or more precisely the head of the femur), through the knee joint (the intercondylar eminence of the tibia), and down to the center of the ankle (the ankle mortise, the fork-like grip between the medial and lateral malleoli).
The ankle, or the talocrural region, is the region where the foot and the leg meet.

Heel

heelsRudoHiel
It is based on the projection of one bone, the calcaneus or heel bone, behind the articulation of the bones of the lower leg.

Obturator nerve

obturator
The adductor muscles of the thigh are innervated by the obturator nerve, with the exception of pectineus which receives fibers from the femoral nerve, and the adductor magnus which receives fibers from the tibial nerve.
The nerve is also responsible for the motor innervation of the adductor muscles of the lower limb (external obturator.

Tibia

shinshin boneshinbone
The calf is the back portion, and the tibia or shinbone together with the smaller fibula make up the front of the lower leg. Legs are used for standing, and all forms of locomotion including recreational such as dancing, and constitute a significant portion of a person's mass. Female legs generally have greater hip anteversion and tibiofemoral angles, but shorter femur and tibial lengths than those in males.
Fractures of the tibia can be divided into those that only involve the tibia; bumper fracture, Segond fracture, Gosselin fracture, toddler's fracture, and those including both the tibia and fibula; trimalleolar fracture, bimalleolar fracture, Pott's fracture.

Posterior tibial artery

posterior tibialposterior tibial arteriestibial
On the back of the knee the popliteal artery runs through the popliteal fossa to the popliteal muscle where it divides into anterior and posterior tibial arteries.
The posterior tibial artery of the lower limb carries blood to the posterior compartment of the leg and plantar surface of the foot, from the popliteal artery via the tibial-fibular trunk.

Great saphenous vein

saphenous veinsaphenous veinsgreater saphenous vein
The great saphenous vein (GSV, alternately "long saphenous vein"; ) is a large, subcutaneous, superficial vein of the leg.

Dorsalis pedis artery

dorsalis pedisarteria dorsalis pedisdorsalis pedis arteries
Distal to the superior and extensor retinacula of the foot it becomes the dorsal artery of the foot.
In human anatomy, the dorsalis pedis artery (dorsal artery of foot), is a blood vessel of the lower limb that carries oxygenated blood to the dorsal surface of the foot.

Anterior tibial vein

anteriorAnterior tibial veinsvein
The anterior tibial vein is a vein in the lower leg.

Posterior tibial vein

posterior tibial veinsposterior tibialvein
In anatomy, there are two posterior tibial veins of the lower limb.

Sciatic nerve

sciaticischiadic nerveright sciatic nerve
The sciatic nerve (L4-S3), the largest and longest nerve in the human body, leaves the pelvis through the greater sciatic foramen.
The sciatic nerve, also called the ischiadic or ischiadic nerve, is a large nerve in humans and other vertebrate animals which begins in the lower part of the sacral plexus and runs through the hip joint and down the lower limb.

Peroneus muscles

peroneal musclesperoneusfibularis muscles
The superficial branch supplies the peroneus muscles and the deep branch enters the extensor compartment; both branches reaches into the dorsal foot.
The peroneus muscles (also called fibularis muscles or peroneals or peronæus) are a group of muscles in the leg.

Crus fracture

Fibular fracturebroke his legbroken leg
A crus fracture is a fracture of the lower legs bones meaning either or both of the tibia and fibula.

Abdominal aorta

abdominalabdominal aorticaorta, abdominal
In the pelvis area, at the level of the last lumbar vertebra, the abdominal aorta, a continuation the descending aorta, splits into a pair of common iliac arteries.

Common iliac artery

common iliac arteriescommon iliaciliac
In the pelvis area, at the level of the last lumbar vertebra, the abdominal aorta, a continuation the descending aorta, splits into a pair of common iliac arteries.
The distribution of the common iliac artery is basically the pelvis and lower limb (as the femoral artery) on the corresponding side.