Humanity and Paper Balloons

Humanity and Paper Balloons is a 1937 black-and-white film directed by Sadao Yamanaka, his last film.wikipedia
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1937 in film

19371937 film
Humanity and Paper Balloons is a 1937 black-and-white film directed by Sadao Yamanaka, his last film.

Sadao Yamanaka

Yamanaka Sadao
Humanity and Paper Balloons is a 1937 black-and-white film directed by Sadao Yamanaka, his last film.
His most internationally discussed film, Humanity and Paper Balloons (1937), was given its first non-Japanese DVD release in the UK as a Masters of Cinema release.

Kamifūsen

kamifusen
While her husband is between jobs, she supports the family by making kamifusen (Japanese paper balloons).
Humanity and Paper Balloons (人情紙風船 Ninjō Kami Fūsen) is an acclaimed 1937 drama film, and Torasan and a Paper Balloon つらいよ 寅次郎紙風船 Otoko wa Tsurai yo: Torajirō Kamifūsen) is a 1981 comedy.

Toho

Toho StudiosToho CompanyToho Company Ltd.

Seppuku

harakirihara-kiriritual suicide
In order to protect their honour, as a last resort, she takes a tantō (short sword) and commits seppuku on her husband and herself.
The expected honor-suicide of the samurai wife is frequently referenced in Japanese literature and film, such as in Taiko by Eiji Yoshikawa, Humanity and Paper Balloons, and Rashomon.

Edo period

Tokugawa periodEdo-periodEdo
The film is set in feudal Japan in the 18th century, the Edo period, and depicts the struggles and schemes of Matajuro Unno, a rōnin, or masterless samurai and his neighbour Shinza, a hairdresser.

Rōnin

roninmasterless samuraimedieval Japan
The film is set in feudal Japan in the 18th century, the Edo period, and depicts the struggles and schemes of Matajuro Unno, a rōnin, or masterless samurai and his neighbour Shinza, a hairdresser.

Sake

sakéTōjiDoburoku
She reminds Unno not to drink too much sake, since he had recently recovered from an illness.

Tantō

tantoAikuchiDagger
In order to protect their honour, as a last resort, she takes a tantō (short sword) and commits seppuku on her husband and herself.

Tadao Sato

Sato TadaoTadao Satō
Largely unknown outside Japan for years, the film has been hailed by critics such as Tadao Sato and Donald Richie, and Japanese filmmakers including Akira Kurosawa, as one of the most influential examples of jidaigeki, or Japanese period films.

Donald Richie

Richie, DonaldRichie
Largely unknown outside Japan for years, the film has been hailed by critics such as Tadao Sato and Donald Richie, and Japanese filmmakers including Akira Kurosawa, as one of the most influential examples of jidaigeki, or Japanese period films.

Akira Kurosawa

KurosawaKurosawa AkiraAkira Kurosawa Prize
Largely unknown outside Japan for years, the film has been hailed by critics such as Tadao Sato and Donald Richie, and Japanese filmmakers including Akira Kurosawa, as one of the most influential examples of jidaigeki, or Japanese period films.

Jidaigeki

Jidai-gekihistoricalperiod
Largely unknown outside Japan for years, the film has been hailed by critics such as Tadao Sato and Donald Richie, and Japanese filmmakers including Akira Kurosawa, as one of the most influential examples of jidaigeki, or Japanese period films.

Masters of Cinema

Eureka! Masters of CinemaList of Masters of Cinema releasesEureka Entertainment

Shima Iwashita

Her maternal aunt Shizue Yamagishi (山岸しづ江)was married to the kabuki actor Kawarasaki Chōjūrō IV (四代目 河原崎長十郎)(1902-1981), who starred in Sadao Yamanaka's 1937 Humanity and Paper Balloons, one of the most influential early Japanese talkies, and was one of the founders in 1931 of the Zenshinza Theatre Company (劇団前進座).

Daisuke Katō

Daisuke Katou
He joined the Zenshinza theatre troupe in 1933 and appeared in a number of stage and film productions under the stage name Enji Ichikawa, including Sadao Yamanaka's Humanity and Paper Balloons and Kenji Mizoguchi's The 47 Ronin.

Cinema of Japan

Japanese filmJapaneseJapanese cinema
Notable talkies of this period include Mikio Naruse's Wife, Be Like A Rose! (Tsuma Yo Bara No Yoni, 1935), which was one of the first Japanese films to gain a theatrical release in the U.S.; Kenji Mizoguchi's Sisters of the Gion (Gion no shimai, 1936); Osaka Elegy (1936); and The Story of the Last Chrysanthemums (1939); and Sadao Yamanaka's Humanity and Paper Balloons (1937).

Cinema of Asia

Asian cinemaAsian filmsAsian film
Notable early talkies from the cinema of Japan included Kenji Mizoguchi's Sisters of the Gion (Gion no shimai, 1936), Osaka Elegy (1936) and The Story of the Last Chrysanthemums (1939), along with Sadao Yamanaka's Humanity and Paper Balloons (1937) and Mikio Naruse's Wife, Be Like A Rose! (Tsuma Yo Bara No Yoni, 1935), which was one of the first Japanese films to gain a theatrical release in the U.S. However, with increasing censorship, the left-leaning tendency films of directors such as Daisuke Ito also began to come under attack.

20th Busan International Film Festival

Busan International Film Festival20th Busan International Film Festival 2015Asian Cinema 100 Ranking