Humphry Repton

Humphrey ReptonRepton
Humphry Repton (21 April 1752 – 24 March 1818) was the last great English landscape designer of the eighteenth century, often regarded as the successor to Capability Brown; he also sowed the seeds of the more intricate and eclectic styles of the 19th century.wikipedia
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Capability Brown

Lancelot "Capability" BrownLancelot 'Capability' BrownLancelot Brown
Humphry Repton (21 April 1752 – 24 March 1818) was the last great English landscape designer of the eighteenth century, often regarded as the successor to Capability Brown; he also sowed the seeds of the more intricate and eclectic styles of the 19th century.
Humphry Repton observed that Brown "fancied himself an architect", but Brown's work as an architect is overshadowed by his great reputation as a designer of landscapes.

Wembley

Wembley, LondonWemblyBorough of Wembley
Around 1787, Richard Page (1748-1803), landowner of Sudbury, to the west of Wembley decided to convert the Page family home 'Wellers' into a country seat and turn the fields around it into a private estate.
The Page family continued as lords of the manor of Wembley for several centuries and eventually commissioned Humphry Repton (1752–1818) the landscape gardener to design what is now Wembley Park.

Wembley Park

Wembley Park, London
Repton often called the areas he landscaped 'parks', and so it is to Repton that Wembley Park owes its name.
In 1792 Richard Page decided to employ the famous landscape architect Humphry Repton (1752–1818) to convert the farmland into wooded parkland and to make improvements to the house.

Woburn Abbey

WoburnWoburn EstateWoburn Park
At Woburn Abbey, Repton foreshadowed another nineteenth-century development, creating themed garden areas including a Chinese garden, American garden, arboretum and forcing garden.
Although it is still a family home to the current duke, it is open on specified days to visitors, along with the diverse estate surrounding it, including the historic landscape gardens and deer park (by Humphry Repton), as well as more recently added attractions including Woburn Safari Park, a miniature railway and a garden/visitor centre.

John Adey Repton

John
Around 1800, however, the two fell out, probably over Nash's refusal to credit the work of Repton's architect son John Adey Repton.
John Repton was the son of Humphry Repton, born at Norwich, Norfolk on 29 March 1775, and educated at Aylsham grammar school and later in a Norwich architect's office.

Catton Park, Norwich

Catton Park, Old Catton, NorwichCatton ParkCatton Park estate
His first paid commission was Catton Park, to the north of Norwich, in 1788.
The park covers 70 acres and was landscape gardener Humphry Repton's first commission.

George Stanley Repton

George ReptonG.S. Repton
Thereafter John Adey and Repton's younger son George Stanley Repton often worked with their father, although George continued to work in Nash's office as well.
George Stanley, the fourth son of Humphry Repton, was a pupil of Augustus Charles Pugin, and entered the office of John Nash, becoming one of his chief assistants.

Blaise Castle Estate

Blaise CastleBlaise Castle House Museum
He also designed one of the most famous 'picturesque' landscapes in Britain at Blaise Castle, near Bristol.
The park was laid out by Humphry Repton in the early 19th century.

John Nash (architect)

John NashNashSir John Nash
In the 1790s he often worked with the relatively unknown architect John Nash, whose loose compositions suited Repton's style.
He met Humphry Repton at Stoke Edith in 1792 and formed a successful partnership with the landscape garden designer.

Ashton Court

Ashton Court EstateAshton Court ParkrunAshton Court, Bristol
Designs by Humphry Repton were used for the landscaping in the early 19th century.

Bury St Edmunds

Bury St. EdmundsBury St EdmondsBury
Repton was born in Bury St Edmunds, the son of a collector of excise, John Repton, and Martha (née Fitch).
Notable people from Bury St Edmunds include the Bishop of Winchester and Lord High Chancellor Stephen Gardiner, the 18th-century landscape architect Humphry Repton, the hymn writer Alice Flowerdew, the micrographer and micromosaic artist Henry Dalton, the author Maria Louise Ramé (also known as Ouida), the engineer and inventor Hiram Codd, the cyclist James Moore, and the portrait painter Rose Mead.

Buckhurst Park, Sussex

Buckhurst ParkBuckhurst
The park, landscaped by Humphry Repton, is Grade II* listed in the National Register of Historic Parks and Gardens.

Crewe Hall

Crewe estateCreweCrewe Hall Hotel
The park was landscaped during the 18th century by Lancelot Brown, William Emes, John Webb and Humphry Repton, and formal gardens were designed by W. A. Nesfield in the 19th century.

Culford School

East Anglian School
The school sits in 480 acre of Repton parkland with grazing, formal gardens, lake, and the 16th-18th Century Culford Hall.

Norwich School (independent school)

Norwich SchoolNorwich Grammar SchoolKing Edward VI School, Norwich
In 1762 his father set up a transport business in Norwich, where Humphry attended Norwich Grammar School.

Stoneleigh Abbey

Stoneleigh
At Stoneleigh Abbey in 1808, Repton foreshadowed another nineteenth-century development, creating a perfect cricket pitch called 'home lawn' in front of the west wing, and a bowling green lawn between the gatehouse and the house.
From the view over the River Avon we can see some of the changes introduced by Humphry Repton.

East India Company College

East India CollegeHaileyburyHaileybury College
The grounds were landscaped by Humphry Repton, his most notable work here being the terraced area to the front of Wilkins' main range and ponds to the west of this.

Antony House

AntonyAnthonyAntony House, Cornwall
The grounds were landscaped by Georgian garden designer Humphry Repton and include the formal garden with the "National Collection of Day Lilies".

Russell Square

Russel SquareRussell Square GardensRussell Square, London
He designed the central gardens in Russell Square, the centrepiece of the Bloomsbury development.
In 2002, the square was re-landscaped in a style based on the original early 19th century layout by Humphry Repton (1752–1818).

Church of St Michael, Aylsham

He died in 1818 and is buried in the graveyard of the Church of St Michael, Aylsham, Norfolk.
The landscape gardener Humphry Repton is buried in the churchyard and is commemorated with a memorial located outside of the chancel door.

Aylsham

Aylsham FairAylsham, Norfolk
He was not successful, and when his parents died in 1778 used his modest legacy to move to a small country estate at Sustead, near Aylsham in Norfolk.
Humphry Repton (1752–1818), the landscape gardener who lived at nearby Sustead, is buried in St Michael's Churchyard, and his watercolours provide a fascinating record of the Market Place in the early 19th century.

Brondesbury Park

Landscape designer Humphry Repton transformed the focal 10 acres of Brondesbury Park, a varying demense but in most years 54 acres in the 18th and 19th century, when he designed the garden.

Cassiobury Park

CashioburyCassiobury EstateCassiobury
C. 1799–1805, the 5th Earl of Essex commissioned James Wyatt to remodel the house in the Gothic style, and Humphry Repton to overhaul the park.

Sustead

He was not successful, and when his parents died in 1778 used his modest legacy to move to a small country estate at Sustead, near Aylsham in Norfolk.
Humphry Repton lived in Sustead.

Honing Hall

Around the building at the first floor Humphry Repton added a platband embellishment in his alterations of 1792.