Hundred (county division)

hundredwapentakehundredshundred courtwapentakesHerredhäradHundred Courtscadastral unit of hundredhundred (county subdivision)
A hundred is an administrative division that is geographically part of a larger region.wikipedia
2,714 Related Articles

Barony (Ireland)

baronybaroniesBaronies of Ireland
In Ireland, a similar subdivision of counties is referred to as a barony, and a hundred is a subdivision of a particularly large townland (most townlands are not divided into hundreds).
In Ireland, a barony (barúntacht, plural barúntachtaí ) is a historical subdivision of a county, analogous to the hundreds into which the counties of England were divided.

Satakunta

SatakundaSatakunta Regionpresent-day province of Satakunta
Other terms for the hundred in English and other languages include wapentake, herred (Danish and Bokmål Norwegian), herad (Nynorsk Norwegian), hérað (Icelandic), härad or hundare (Swedish), Harde (German), Satakunta or kihlakunta (Finnish), kihelkond (Estonian), and cantref (Welsh).
The name of the region literally means Hundred.

Tithing

tythingtithingstithingman
A tithing or tything was a historic English legal, administrative or territorial unit, originally ten hides (and hence, one tenth of a hundred).

Gau (territory)

GauGauegaus
There was an equivalent traditional Germanic system, in Old High German a huntari, a division of a gau (and described as early as AD 98 by Tacitus – the centeni), but the OED believes that the link between the two is not established.
In the Carolingian Empire, a Gau was a subdivision of the realm, further divided into Hundreds.

Shire

shiresshiringsheires
In England a hundred was the division of a shire for military and judicial purposes under the common law, which could have varying extent of common feudal ownership, from complete suzerainty to minor royal or ecclesiastical prerogatives and rights of ownership.
The shires were divided into hundreds or wapentakes, although other less common sub-divisions existed.

Local Government Act 1894

Local Government Act1894Local Government Act of 1894
Until the introduction of districts by the Local Government Act 1894, hundreds were the only widely used assessment unit intermediate in size between the parish, with its various administrative functions, and the county, with its formal, ceremonial functions.
Although the Act made no provision to abolish the Hundreds, which had previously been the only widely used administrative unit between the parish and the county in size, the reorganisation displaced their remaining functions.

Rape (county subdivision)

Raperapesa county subdivision
Exceptionally, in the counties of Kent and Sussex, there was a sub-division intermediate in size between the hundred and the shire: several hundreds were grouped together to form lathes in Kent and rapes in Sussex.
Each rape was split into several hundreds.

Leicestershire

Leicestershire, EnglandCounty of LeicesterLeicester
Leicestershire had six (up from four at Domesday), whereas Devon, nearly three times the size, had 32. The Danelaw counties of Yorkshire, Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Northamptonshire, Nottinghamshire, Rutland and Lincolnshire were divided into wapentakes, just as most of the remainder of England was divided into hundreds.
Leicestershire was recorded in the Domesday Book in four wapentakes: Guthlaxton, Framland, Goscote and Gartree.

Common law

common-lawcourts of common lawcommon
In England a hundred was the division of a shire for military and judicial purposes under the common law, which could have varying extent of common feudal ownership, from complete suzerainty to minor royal or ecclesiastical prerogatives and rights of ownership.
Prior to the Norman Conquest, much of England's legal business took place in the local folk courts of its various shires and hundreds.

Kent

Kent, EnglandCounty of KentCounty Kent
Exceptionally, in the counties of Kent and Sussex, there was a sub-division intermediate in size between the hundred and the shire: several hundreds were grouped together to form lathes in Kent and rapes in Sussex.
Kent was traditionally partitioned into East and West Kent, and into lathes and hundreds.

Tourn

For especially serious crimes, the hundred was under the jurisdiction of the Crown; the chief magistrate was a sheriff, and his circuit was called the sheriff's tourn.
The tourn (tour, turn) was the bi-annual inspection of the hundreds of his shire made by the sheriff in medieval England.

Districts of England

districtdistrictslocal government district
Until the introduction of districts by the Local Government Act 1894, hundreds were the only widely used assessment unit intermediate in size between the parish, with its various administrative functions, and the county, with its formal, ceremonial functions.
Parishes were the successors of the manorial system and historically had been grouped into hundreds.

Danegeld

geld or danegeldgeldGeld Units
During Norman times, the hundred would pay geld based on the number of hides.
In southern England the danegeld was based on hidages, an area of agricultural land sufficient to support a family, with the exception of Kent, where the unit was a sulung of four yokes, the amount of land that could be ploughed in a season by a team of oxen; in the north the typical unit was the carucate, or ploughland, equivalent to Kent's sulung, and East Anglia was assessed by the hundred.

Anglo-Saxons

Anglo-SaxonSaxonAnglo Saxon
The wapentake was the rough equivalent in the Danelaw of the Anglo-Saxon hundred.
The early Anglo-Saxon period includes the creation of an English nation, with many of the aspects that survive today, including regional government of shires and hundreds.

Chiltern Hundreds

Steward of the Chiltern HundredsStewardship of the Chiltern HundredsCrown Steward and Bailiff of the three Chiltern Hundreds of Stoke, Desborough and Burnham
The steward of the Chiltern Hundreds is notable as a legal fiction, owing to a quirk of British Parliamentary law.
The Chiltern Hundreds is an ancient administrative area in Buckinghamshire, England, composed of three "hundreds" and lying partially within the Chiltern Hills.

Domesday Book

Domesday SurveyDomesdayDoomsday Book
In many parts of the country, the Domesday Book contained a radically different set of hundreds from that which later became established.
The fees listed within the chapter concerning a particular tenant-in-chief were usually ordered, but not in a systematic or rigorous fashion, by the Hundred Court under the jurisdiction of which they were situated, not by geographic location.

Lathe (county subdivision)

Lathelathes
Exceptionally, in the counties of Kent and Sussex, there was a sub-division intermediate in size between the hundred and the shire: several hundreds were grouped together to form lathes in Kent and rapes in Sussex.
By the late Anglo-Saxon period they seem to have become purely administrative units, each of which contained several hundreds.

Sussex

County of SussexSussex, EnglandSouth Saxon
Exceptionally, in the counties of Kent and Sussex, there was a sub-division intermediate in size between the hundred and the shire: several hundreds were grouped together to form lathes in Kent and rapes in Sussex.
Each rape was split into several hundreds.

Hide (unit)

hideshidehidage
It may once have referred to an area of 100 (or possibly 120) hides, though a "hide" is not a specific area: instead it was conceptually the amount of land required to support a family.
This number was then divided up between the hundreds in the county.

Reeve (England)

reevereevesBoroughreeve
To assess how much everyone had to pay, a clerk and a knight were sent by the king to each county; they sat with the shire-reeve (or sheriff), of the county and a select group of local knights.
Tithings were organised into groups of 10, called hundreds due to containing 100 hides; in modern times, these ancient hundreds still mostly retain their historic boundaries, despite each generally now containing vastly more than a mere 100 families.

Beltisloe

Beltisloe Wapentake
Although no longer part of local government, there is some correspondence between the rural deanery and the former wapentake or hundred, especially in the East Midlands, the Archdeaconry of Buckingham and the Diocese of York (see, for example, Beltisloe or Loveden).
Beltisloe is a Deanery of the Diocese of Lincoln in England, and a former Wapentake.

Thing (assembly)

thingthingsting
According to some authorities, weapons were not brandished during a Norse assembly (known as a thing) but were allowed to be taken up again after the assembly had finished.
In the Viking Age, things were the public assemblies of the free men of a country, province, or a hundred (härad, hundare, herred).

Devon

DevonshireDevon, EnglandCounty of Devon
Leicestershire had six (up from four at Domesday), whereas Devon, nearly three times the size, had 32.
Historically Devon was divided into 32 hundreds: Axminster, Bampton, Black Torrington, Braunton, Cliston, Coleridge, Colyton, Crediton, East Budleigh, Ermington, Exminster, Fremington, Halberton, Hartland, Hayridge, Haytor, Hemyock, Lifton, North Tawton and Winkleigh, Ottery, Plympton, Roborough, Shebbear, Shirwell, South Molton, Stanborough, Tavistock, Teignbridge, Tiverton, West Budleigh, Witheridge, and Wonford.

Nottinghamshire

County of NottinghamNottinghamNottinghamshire, England
The Danelaw counties of Yorkshire, Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Northamptonshire, Nottinghamshire, Rutland and Lincolnshire were divided into wapentakes, just as most of the remainder of England was divided into hundreds.
Until 1610, Nottinghamshire was divided into eight Wapentakes.

Northamptonshire

NorthantsCounty of NorthamptonNorthamptonshire, England
The Danelaw counties of Yorkshire, Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Northamptonshire, Nottinghamshire, Rutland and Lincolnshire were divided into wapentakes, just as most of the remainder of England was divided into hundreds.
Prior to 1901 the ancient hundreds were disused.