Hunter S. Thompson

Hunter ThompsonHunter S ThompsonFire in the NutsThompson, Hunter S.H. ThompsonHunt ThompsonHunter S. Thompson-esque
Hunter Stockton Thompson (July 18, 1937 – February 20, 2005) was an American journalist and author, and the founder of the gonzo journalism movement.wikipedia
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Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas

Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American DreamFear and Loathing...in Las Vegas
Thompson remains best known for Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (1971), a book first serialized in Rolling Stone in which he grapples with the implications of what he considered the failure of the 1960s counterculture movement.
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream is a 1971 novel by Hunter S. Thompson, illustrated by Ralph Steadman.

Hell's Angels: The Strange and Terrible Saga of the Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs

Hell's AngelsHell's Angels: A Strange and Terrible Saga Angels
He first rose to prominence with the publication of Hell's Angels (1967), a book for which he spent a year living and riding with the Hells Angels motorcycle gang in order to write a first-hand account of the lives and experiences of its members.
Hell's Angels: The Strange and Terrible Saga of the Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs is a book written by Hunter S. Thompson, first published in 1967 by Random House.

Gonzo journalism

gonzogonzo journalista style of first-person confrontational journalism
Hunter Stockton Thompson (July 18, 1937 – February 20, 2005) was an American journalist and author, and the founder of the gonzo journalism movement.
The word "gonzo" is believed to have been first used in 1970 to describe an article by Hunter S. Thompson, who later popularized the style.

Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone MagazineRolling Stone IndonesiaRolling Stone'' magazine
Thompson remains best known for Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (1971), a book first serialized in Rolling Stone in which he grapples with the implications of what he considered the failure of the 1960s counterculture movement. Its members at the time, generally drawn from Louisville's wealthy upper-class families, included Porter Bibb, who later became the first publisher of Rolling Stone at Thompson's behest.
It was first known for its musical coverage of rock music and for political reporting by Hunter S. Thompson.

Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (film)

Fear and Loathing in Las VegasFear and Loathing in Las Vegas'' (film)film of the same name
It was adapted on film twice: loosely in Where the Buffalo Roam starring Bill Murray as Thompson in 1980, and directly in 1998 by director Terry Gilliam in a film starring Johnny Depp and Benicio del Toro.
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas is a 1998 American psychedelic satirical black comedy road film adapted from Hunter S. Thompson's novel Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.

The Kentucky Derby Is Decadent and Depraved

an articlefor an article
In 1970, he wrote an unconventional magazine feature titled "The Kentucky Derby Is Decadent and Depraved" for Scanlan's Monthly which both raised his profile and established him as a writer with counterculture credibility.
"The Kentucky Derby Is Decadent and Depraved" is a seminal sports article written by Hunter S. Thompson on the 1970 Kentucky Derby in Louisville, Kentucky, first appearing in an issue of Scanlan's Monthly in June of that year.

Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail '72

Fear and LoathingFear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail
He covered Nixon's 1972 reelection campaign for Rolling Stone and later collected the stories in book form as Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail '72.
Written by Hunter S. Thompson and illustrated by Ralph Steadman, the book was largely derived from articles serialized in Rolling Stone throughout 1972.

Where the Buffalo Roam

It was adapted on film twice: loosely in Where the Buffalo Roam starring Bill Murray as Thompson in 1980, and directly in 1998 by director Terry Gilliam in a film starring Johnny Depp and Benicio del Toro.
Where the Buffalo Roam is a 1980 American semi-biographical comedy film which loosely depicts author Hunter S. Thompson's rise to fame in the 1970s and his relationship with Chicano attorney and activist Oscar "Zeta" Acosta.

Bill Murray

Luke MurrayMurraythe film actor
It was adapted on film twice: loosely in Where the Buffalo Roam starring Bill Murray as Thompson in 1980, and directly in 1998 by director Terry Gilliam in a film starring Johnny Depp and Benicio del Toro.
He followed this with a portrayal of Hunter S. Thompson in 1980's Where the Buffalo Roam.

Johnny Depp

DeppJohn Christopher Depp IIJohn Depp
It was adapted on film twice: loosely in Where the Buffalo Roam starring Bill Murray as Thompson in 1980, and directly in 1998 by director Terry Gilliam in a film starring Johnny Depp and Benicio del Toro.
Depp was a fan and friend of writer Hunter S. Thompson, and played his alter ego Raoul Duke in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (1998), Terry Gilliam's film adaptation of Thompson's pseudobiographical novel of the same name.

Benicio del Toro

Benicio del '''ToroBenicio Monserrate Rafael Del Toro SánchezFelatio Del Toro
It was adapted on film twice: loosely in Where the Buffalo Roam starring Bill Murray as Thompson in 1980, and directly in 1998 by director Terry Gilliam in a film starring Johnny Depp and Benicio del Toro.
For Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, the 1998 film adaptation of Hunter S. Thompson's famous book, he gained more than 40 lbs.

Porter Bibb

Its members at the time, generally drawn from Louisville's wealthy upper-class families, included Porter Bibb, who later became the first publisher of Rolling Stone at Thompson's behest.
There he got to know another club member, Hunter S. Thompson, who would become an influential counterculture journalist.

Hells Angels

Hells AngelHell's AngelsHells Angels Motorcycle Club
He first rose to prominence with the publication of Hell's Angels (1967), a book for which he spent a year living and riding with the Hells Angels motorcycle gang in order to write a first-hand account of the lives and experiences of its members.
Writing a book about the club launched the career of "Gonzo" journalist Hunter S. Thompson.

Prince Jellyfish

During this period Thompson wrote two novels, Prince Jellyfish and The Rum Diary, and submitted many short stories to publishers – with little success.
Prince Jellyfish is an unpublished novel by American journalist and author Hunter S. Thompson.

Rogue (magazine)

RogueRogue'' magazineRogue Magazine Philippines
While there, he published his first magazine feature (in the nationally distributed Rogue magazine) on the artisan and bohemian culture of Big Sur.
The first two magazine articles written by Hunter S. Thompson appeared in Rogue in 1961.

The Rum Diary (novel)

The Rum Diarynovelnovel of the same name
During this period Thompson wrote two novels, Prince Jellyfish and The Rum Diary, and submitted many short stories to publishers – with little success.
The Rum Diary is an early novel by American writer Hunter S. Thompson.

Aspen, Colorado

AspenAspen, COCity of Aspen
They married on May 19, 1963, shortly after returning to the United States, and lived briefly in Aspen, Colorado, where they had a son, Juan Fitzgerald Thompson (born March 23, 1964).
Gonzo journalist Hunter S. Thompson worked out of a downtown hotel and ran unsuccessfully for county sheriff.

Horse Cave, Kentucky

Horse CaveHorse Cave, KY
Thompson was born into a middle-class family in Louisville, Kentucky, the first of three sons of Virginia Ray Davison (1908, Springfield, Kentucky – March 20, 1998, Louisville), who worked as head librarian at the Louisville Free Public Library and Jack Robert Thompson (September 4, 1893, Horse Cave, Kentucky – July 3, 1952, Louisville), a public insurance adjuster and World War I veteran.
Horse Cave was the birthplace of Jack Robert Thompson (September 4, 1893), the father of noted author and journalist Hunter S. Thompson, and former NBA player Clarence Glover.

Scanlan's Monthly

Scanlan
In 1970, he wrote an unconventional magazine feature titled "The Kentucky Derby Is Decadent and Depraved" for Scanlan's Monthly which both raised his profile and established him as a writer with counterculture credibility.
Scanlan's is best-remembered for featuring several articles by Hunter S. Thompson, and especially for what is considered the first instance of gonzo journalism, Thompson's "The Kentucky Derby Is Decadent and Depraved".

Esalen Institute

EsalenSoviet/American Cultural Exchange Program
After returning to the United States, Thompson hitchhiked along U.S. Highway 40, eventually ending up in Big Sur working as a security guard and caretaker at Slates Hot Springs for an eight-month period in 1961, just before it became the Esalen Institute.
The property was patrolled by gun-toting Hunter S. Thompson.

Glen Ellen, California

Glen EllenGlen Ellen, CA
In 1964 the family relocated to Glen Ellen, California, where Thompson continued to write for the National Observer on an array of domestic subjects.
Glen Ellen is the location of Jack London State Historic Park (including the Wolf House), Sonoma Valley Regional Park, and a former home of Hunter S. Thompson.

Ralph Steadman

SteadmanSteadman, Ralph
For that article, editor Warren Hinckle paired Thompson with illustrator Ralph Steadman, who drew expressionist illustrations with lipstick and eyeliner.
Ralph Idris Steadman (born 15 May 1936) is a Welsh illustrator best known for collaboration and friendship with the American writer Hunter S. Thompson.

Big Sur

Big Sur, CaliforniaBig Sur CoastPoint Sur
After returning to the United States, Thompson hitchhiked along U.S. Highway 40, eventually ending up in Big Sur working as a security guard and caretaker at Slates Hot Springs for an eight-month period in 1961, just before it became the Esalen Institute.
Hunter S. Thompson worked as a security guard and caretaker at a resort in Big Sur Hot Springs for eight months in 1961, just before the Esalen Institute was founded at that location.

Summer of Love

The Summer of Lovesummer of 19671967
In 1967, shortly before the Summer of Love Thompson wrote "The 'Hashbury' is the Capital of the Hippies" for The New York Times Magazine.
Hunter S. Thompson termed the district "Hashbury" in The New York Times Magazine, and the activities in the area were reported almost daily.

New Journalism

New Journalistsparticipatory journalismThe New Journalism
It also set him on a path to establishing his own sub-genre of New Journalism which he called "Gonzo," which was essentially an ongoing experiment in which the writer becomes a central figure and even a participant in the events of the narrative.
The term was codified with its current meaning by Tom Wolfe in a 1973 collection of journalism articles he published as The New Journalism, which included works by himself, Truman Capote, Hunter S. Thompson, Norman Mailer, Joan Didion, Terry Southern, Robert Christgau, Gay Talese and others.