Hurricane Katrina

KatrinaHurricanes Katrina2005 Hurricane KatrinahurricaneKatrina disasterpost-Katrina2005's Hurricane KatrinaHurricane Katrina (2005)Hurricane Katrina disasterHurricanes
Hurricane Katrina was a Category 5 hurricane that made landfall on Florida and Louisiana in August 2005, causing catastrophic damage, particularly in the city of New Orleans and the surrounding areas, and over 1,200 deaths.wikipedia
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2005 Atlantic hurricane season

2005282005 season
The storm was the third major hurricane of the record-breaking 2005 Atlantic hurricane season, as well as the fourth-most intense Atlantic hurricane on record to make landfall in the contiguous United States, behind only the 1935 Labor Day hurricane, Hurricane Camille in 1969, and Hurricane Michael in 2018.
Of the storms that made landfall, five of the season's seven major hurricanes—Dennis, Emily, Katrina, Rita, and Wilma—were responsible for the majority of the destruction.

Effects of Hurricane Katrina in Mississippi

Hurricane Katrinaaftermath of Hurricane Katrinacatastrophic effects
Severe property damage occurred in numerous coastal areas, such as Mississippi beachfront towns where boats and casino barges rammed buildings, pushing cars and houses inland; water reached 6 – from the beach.
Hurricane Katrina's winds and storm surge reached the Mississippi coastline on the morning of August 29, 2005.

Hurricane Harvey

HarveyHarvey 2017Hurricane Harvey (2017)
The total property damage was estimated at $125 billion (2005 USD), nearly five times the damage wrought by Hurricane Andrew in 1992, tying Katrina with Hurricane Harvey of 2017 as the costliest Atlantic tropical cyclone on record.
It is tied with 2005's Hurricane Katrina as the costliest tropical cyclone on record, inflicting $125 billion (2017 USD) in damage, primarily from catastrophic rainfall-triggered flooding in the Houston metropolitan area and Southeast Texas.

List of costliest Atlantic hurricanes

costliestcostliest Atlantic hurricanecostliest hurricane
The total property damage was estimated at $125 billion (2005 USD), nearly five times the damage wrought by Hurricane Andrew in 1992, tying Katrina with Hurricane Harvey of 2017 as the costliest Atlantic tropical cyclone on record.
The costliest tropical cyclone on record in the Atlantic is held jointly by hurricanes Katrina and Harvey, both of which resulted in approximately $125 billion in property damage during the year they occurred.

Effects of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans

Effect of Hurricane Katrina on New OrleansHurricane KatrinaNew Orleans
The scale of the disaster in New Orleans provoked massive national and international response efforts; federal, local and private rescue operations evacuated displaced persons out of the city over the following weeks.
As the center of Hurricane Katrina passed southeast of New Orleans on August 29, 2005, winds downtown were in the Category 1 range with frequent intense gusts and tidal surge.

Hurricane Andrew

Andrew1992Hurricane Andrew Relief
The total property damage was estimated at $125 billion (2005 USD), nearly five times the damage wrought by Hurricane Andrew in 1992, tying Katrina with Hurricane Harvey of 2017 as the costliest Atlantic tropical cyclone on record.
It was the strongest landfalling hurricane in decades and the costliest hurricane to make landfall anywhere in the United States, until it was surpassed by Katrina in 2005.

New Orleans

New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans, LAOrleans Parish
Hurricane Katrina was a Category 5 hurricane that made landfall on Florida and Louisiana in August 2005, causing catastrophic damage, particularly in the city of New Orleans and the surrounding areas, and over 1,200 deaths.
New Orleans was severely affected by Hurricane Katrina on August 29, 2005, which resulted in flooding more than 80% of the city, thousands of deaths, and so much displacement because of damaged communities and lost housing as to cause a population decline of over 50%.

Michael D. Brown

Michael BrownBrownMichael D. "Brownie" Brown
There was widespread criticism and investigation of the emergency response from federal, state and local governments, which resulted in the resignations of Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) director Michael D. Brown and New Orleans Police Department (NOPD) Superintendent Eddie Compass.
He was appointed in January 2003 by President George W. Bush and resigned following his controversial handling of Hurricane Katrina in September 2005.

Ray Nagin

C. Ray NaginNew Orleans e-mail controversiesNew Orleans e-mail controversy
Many other government officials were criticized for their responses, especially New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin, Louisiana Governor Kathleen Blanco, and President George W. Bush.
A Democrat, Nagin became internationally known in 2005 in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

Kathleen Blanco

Kathleen Babineaux BlancoBlancoBlanco, Kathleen
Many other government officials were criticized for their responses, especially New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin, Louisiana Governor Kathleen Blanco, and President George W. Bush.
In August, Hurricane Katrina devastated the New Orleans region, an urban area of 1.4 million people.

United States Coast Guard

U.S. Coast GuardCoast GuardUS Coast Guard
Several agencies including the United States Coast Guard (USCG), National Hurricane Center (NHC) and National Weather Service (NWS) were commended for their actions.
In a 2005 article in Time magazine following Hurricane Katrina, the author wrote, "the Coast Guard's most valuable contribution to [a military effort when catastrophe hits] may be as a model of flexibility, and most of all, spirit."

Louisiana

LAState of LouisianaLouisiana, USA
Hurricane Katrina was a Category 5 hurricane that made landfall on Florida and Louisiana in August 2005, causing catastrophic damage, particularly in the city of New Orleans and the surrounding areas, and over 1,200 deaths. The storm strengthened into a Category 5 hurricane over the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico but weakened before making its second landfall as a Category 3 hurricane on August 29, over southeast Louisiana and Mississippi.
On August 29, 2005, New Orleans and many other low-lying parts of the state along the Gulf of Mexico were hit by the catastrophic Hurricane Katrina.

George W. Bush

BushPresident BushPresident George W. Bush
Many other government officials were criticized for their responses, especially New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin, Louisiana Governor Kathleen Blanco, and President George W. Bush.
After his re-election, Bush received criticism from across the political spectrum for his handling of the Iraq War, Hurricane Katrina, and other challenges.

Hurricane Rita

RitaTropical Storm RitaHouston mass evacuation
The pressure measurement made Katrina the fifth most intense Atlantic hurricane on record at the time, only to be surpassed by Hurricanes Rita and Wilma later in the season; it was also the strongest hurricane ever recorded in the Gulf of Mexico at the time.
Part of the record-breaking 2005 Atlantic hurricane season, which included three of the top ten most intense Atlantic hurricanes ever recorded (along with #1 Wilma and #7 Katrina), Rita was the seventeenth named storm, tenth hurricane, and fifth major hurricane of the 2005 season.

Hurricane Wilma

WilmaTropical Storm Wilma2005
The pressure measurement made Katrina the fifth most intense Atlantic hurricane on record at the time, only to be surpassed by Hurricanes Rita and Wilma later in the season; it was also the strongest hurricane ever recorded in the Gulf of Mexico at the time.
Part of the record-breaking 2005 Atlantic hurricane season, which included three of the ten most intense Atlantic hurricanes ever (along with #4 Rita and #7 Katrina), Wilma was the twenty-second storm, thirteenth hurricane, sixth major hurricane, fourth Category 5 hurricane, and the second-most destructive hurricane of the 2005 season.

Hallandale Beach, Florida

Hallandale BeachHallandale, FloridaHallandale
Early on the following day, the tropical depression then intensified into a tropical storm as it headed generally westward toward Florida, strengthening into a hurricane only two hours before making landfall at Hallandale Beach and Aventura on August 25.
Hurricane Katrina first made landfall between Hallandale Beach and Aventura, Florida.

Gulfport, Mississippi

GulfportGulfport, MSMississippi (Gulfport)
As Katrina made landfall, its front right quadrant, which held the strongest winds, slammed into Gulfport, Mississippi, devastating it.
On August 29, 2005, Gulfport was hit by the strong eastern side of Hurricane Katrina.

Tropical Depression Ten (2005)

Tropical Depression Ten
The storm originated on August 23, 2005, from the merger of a tropical wave and the remnants of Tropical Depression Ten.
It degenerated into a remnant low on August 14, but its remnants partially contributed to the formation of Hurricane Katrina, after merging with a tropical wave on August 19.

Mississippi

MSState of MississippiGeography of Mississippi
The storm strengthened into a Category 5 hurricane over the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico but weakened before making its second landfall as a Category 3 hurricane on August 29, over southeast Louisiana and Mississippi.
Hurricane Camille in 1969 and Hurricane Katrina in 2005, which killed 238 people in the state, were the most devastating hurricanes to hit the state.

Florida

FLState of FloridaFloridian
Hurricane Katrina was a Category 5 hurricane that made landfall on Florida and Louisiana in August 2005, causing catastrophic damage, particularly in the city of New Orleans and the surrounding areas, and over 1,200 deaths.
In 1992, Florida was the site of what was then the costliest weather disaster in U.S. history, Hurricane Andrew, which caused more than $25 billion in damages when it struck during August; it held that distinction until 2005, when Hurricane Katrina surpassed it, and it has since been surpassed by six other hurricanes.

2017 Atlantic hurricane season

20172017 seasonTropical Storm Philippe
The total property damage was estimated at $125 billion (2005 USD), nearly five times the damage wrought by Hurricane Andrew in 1992, tying Katrina with Hurricane Harvey of 2017 as the costliest Atlantic tropical cyclone on record.
Harvey attained Category 4 status prior to reaching the Texas coastline, ending the record streak of 4,323 days without a major hurricane landfall in the United States; with damage estimates up to $125 billion, Harvey is tied with Hurricane Katrina as the costliest natural disaster on record in the United States.

Saffir–Simpson scale

Saffir–Simpson hurricane wind scaleSaffir-Simpson Hurricane ScaleSaffir–Simpson Hurricane Scale
The storm was the third major hurricane of the record-breaking 2005 Atlantic hurricane season, as well as the fourth-most intense Atlantic hurricane on record to make landfall in the contiguous United States, behind only the 1935 Labor Day hurricane, Hurricane Camille in 1969, and Hurricane Michael in 2018. Hurricane Katrina was a Category 5 hurricane that made landfall on Florida and Louisiana in August 2005, causing catastrophic damage, particularly in the city of New Orleans and the surrounding areas, and over 1,200 deaths. The storm strengthened into a Category 5 hurricane over the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico but weakened before making its second landfall as a Category 3 hurricane on August 29, over southeast Louisiana and Mississippi.
The agency cited various hurricanes as reasons for removing the "scientifically inaccurate" information, including Hurricane Katrina (2005) and Hurricane Ike (2008), which both had stronger than estimated storm surges, and Hurricane Charley (2004), which had weaker than estimated storm surge.

National Weather Service bulletin for Hurricane Katrina

National Weather Service bulletin for New Orleans regiona bulletinissued a bulletin predicting "devastating" damage
The National Weather Service's New Orleans/Baton Rouge office issued a vividly worded bulletin on August 28 predicting that the area would be "uninhabitable for weeks" after "devastating damage" caused by Katrina, which at that time rivaled the intensity of Hurricane Camille.
The National Weather Service bulletin for the New Orleans region of 10:11 a.m., August 28, 2005 was a particularly dire warning issued by the local Weather Forecast Office in Slidell, Louisiana, warning of the devastation that of Hurricane Katrina could wreak upon the Gulf Coast of the United States, and the torrent of pain, misery and suffering that would follow once the storm left the area.

Tropical cyclone warnings and watches

tropical storm warninghurricane watchhurricane warning
Additionally, the National Hurricane Center issued many tropical cyclone warnings and watches throughout the duration of Katrina:
It was developed in response to confusion resulting from the landfall of Hurricane Katrina.

Miami-Dade County, Florida

Miami-Dade CountyMiami-DadeDade County
As a result, local flooding occurred in Miami-Dade County, damaging approximately 100 homes.
This was the costliest natural disaster in US history until Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf region in 2005.