Hurricane Liza

Liza1976's LizaHurricane Liza in 1976
Hurricane Liza caused the worst natural disaster in the history of Baja California Sur.wikipedia
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1976 Pacific hurricane season

19761976 seasonAnnette
The seventeenth tropical cyclone, thirteenth named storm, and eighth hurricane of the 1976 Pacific hurricane season, Liza developed from an area of disturbed weather southwest of the Mexican coast on September 25. Slowly intensifying, the system attained tropical storm strength the following day.
Hurricane Liza was the deadliest storm of the season when it killed over 600 people in Mexico.

List of Pacific hurricanes

eastern Pacificfive most active Pacific hurricane seasonsList of costliest Pacific hurricanes
Overall, at least 1,263 fatalities and $100 million (1976 USD) in damage are attributed to the hurricane, making it one of the deadliest tropical cyclones on record in the eastern Pacific, as well as one of the few Pacific hurricanes to kill more than 1,000 people.

List of Baja California Peninsula hurricanes

Baja California peninsula
List of Baja California Peninsula hurricanes
The most expensive storm in the area is Hurricane Odile in 2014 and the deadliest is Hurricane Liza in 1976.

List of Category 4 Pacific hurricanes

Category 4 hurricaneCategory 4 Pacific hurricane
List of Category 4 Pacific hurricanes

Hurricane Liza (disambiguation)

LizaOther storms with the same nameOther tropical cyclones named Liza
Other tropical cyclones named Liza
Hurricane Liza (1976) – A category 4 hurricane that killed 600 people in northern Mexico.

Hurricane Odile

Odile2014's OdileHurricane Odile in 2014
Hurricane Odile
Hurricane Liza (1976) – Considered the worst natural disaster in the history of Baja California Sur

Natural disaster

natural disastersnaturaldisaster
Hurricane Liza caused the worst natural disaster in the history of Baja California Sur.

History of Mexico

Mexican historyMexicoMexican
Hurricane Liza caused the worst natural disaster in the history of Baja California Sur.

Tropical cyclone

hurricanetropical stormhurricanes
The seventeenth tropical cyclone, thirteenth named storm, and eighth hurricane of the 1976 Pacific hurricane season, Liza developed from an area of disturbed weather southwest of the Mexican coast on September 25. Slowly intensifying, the system attained tropical storm strength the following day.

Tropical cyclone naming

named stormnamednamed storms
The seventeenth tropical cyclone, thirteenth named storm, and eighth hurricane of the 1976 Pacific hurricane season, Liza developed from an area of disturbed weather southwest of the Mexican coast on September 25. Slowly intensifying, the system attained tropical storm strength the following day.

Eye (cyclone)

eyeeye featureeyewall
In favorable conditions, Liza continued to intensify, reaching hurricane strength on September 28 after developing an eye.

Atmospheric pressure

barometric pressureair pressurepressure
The hurricane peaked in intensity as a Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir–Simpson hurricane scale on September 30, with winds of 140 mph and a minimum barometric pressure of 948 mbar (hPa; 28.00 inHg).

Gulf of California

Sea of CortezGulf of California (Sea of Cortez)Sea of Cortés
Liza weakened as it moved northward into the Gulf of California.

Landfall

landfallslandfallingstruck
Shortly thereafter, the hurricane made its second landfall north of Los Mochis, Sinaloa with winds of 115 mph (185 km/h), making it one of 13 storms to make landfall as major hurricanes in the basin.

Flash flood

flash floodsflash floodingflash-flood
Liza brought heavy rainfall to the area, which caused significant flash flooding.

Sinaloa

Statefederal district 1 of SinaloaNorthern Sinaloa
In the states of Sinaloa and Sonora, Liza caused moderate damage and left 30,000 to 54,000 homeless, along with 155 more casualties.

Sonora

Sonora, MexicoSonora StateState of Sonora
In the states of Sinaloa and Sonora, Liza caused moderate damage and left 30,000 to 54,000 homeless, along with 155 more casualties.

United States

American🇺🇸U.S.
The remnants of the storm later affected the United States, bringing moderate rainfall

United States dollar

$US$USD
Overall, at least 1,263 fatalities and $100 million (1976 USD) in damage are attributed to the hurricane, making it one of the deadliest tropical cyclones on record in the eastern Pacific, as well as one of the few Pacific hurricanes to kill more than 1,000 people.

Pacific hurricane

Pacific basinEastern Pacifichurricane
Overall, at least 1,263 fatalities and $100 million (1976 USD) in damage are attributed to the hurricane, making it one of the deadliest tropical cyclones on record in the eastern Pacific, as well as one of the few Pacific hurricanes to kill more than 1,000 people.

Satellite imagery

satellite imagessatellite imagesatellite imaging
Hurricane Liza originated from a very large area of intense thunderstorms that developed about 400 mi southwest of the Mexican coast on September 25. Later that day, satellite imagery indicated that the system had developed a cyclonic circulation.

Coordinated Universal Time

UTCUTC-3UTC-4
It is estimated that a tropical depression developed at 1800 UTC on September 25, centered about 485 mi east-northeast of Zihuatanejo, Guerrero.

Zihuatanejo

Zihuatanejo, GuerreroZihuatanejo, MexicoIxtapa–Zihuatanejo
It is estimated that a tropical depression developed at 1800 UTC on September 25, centered about 485 mi east-northeast of Zihuatanejo, Guerrero.

Guerrero

Guerrero StateState of GuerreroGuerrero, Mexico
It is estimated that a tropical depression developed at 1800 UTC on September 25, centered about 485 mi east-northeast of Zihuatanejo, Guerrero.

Sea surface temperature

sea surface temperatureswater temperaturesocean temperatures
Thereafter, Liza turned to the north at 7 mph and began to strengthen while moving through sea surface temperatures of 85 F. Within 48 hours of the storm's formation, the Eastern Pacific Hurricane Center (EPHC) reported winds of 65 mph, and Liza intensified into a hurricane early on September 28.