A report on Hydrofoil

The Italian hydrofoil Gianni M, the largest hydrofoil in the world.
The two types of hydrofoils: surface-piercing and fully submerged
Forlanini's hydrofoil over Lake Maggiore, 1906
Alexander Graham Bell's HD-4 on a test run, c. 1919
A schematic illustration of self-stabilizing systems for fully submerged hydrofoils. Its computer gathers data for the boom position and current water level to determine the required flap position.
A Project 206M "Shtorm" patrol fast attack craft hydrofoil of the Cuban Navy.
Aerial port beam view of the Italian Sparviero class hydrofoil-missile NIBBIO P-421 underway.
USS Aquila, a military hydrofoil. The T-shaped foils are visible just below the water.
HMCS Bras d'Or, a military concept hydrofoil.
Team New Zealand's AC72 at the 2013 America's Cup, San Francisco Bay.
Ukrainian-built Voskhod on the North Sea Canal, the Netherlands
TurboJET's Urzela JetFoil on West Lamma Channel, Hong Kong
TurboJET's Barca Foilcat
Flying Poseidon (built 1982 ) had just berthed at Rhodes from Fethiye when the sister Kometas hydrofoil from Bodrum also arrived from Turkey in 2011.
The first Kometa 120M, named Chaika (Seagull) after Valentina Tereshkova's callsign, moored in Sevastopol
Hydrofoil high-speed boat Meteor on a Lake Ladoga, Russia.
Passenger hydrofoil Flying Dolphin Zeus moving at high speed near Piraeus, Greece.
Voskhod
Meteor
Raketa
Polesye
Kometa

Lifting surface, or foil, that operates in water.

- Hydrofoil
The Italian hydrofoil Gianni M, the largest hydrofoil in the world.

51 related topics with Alpha

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Bell c. undefined 1917

Alexander Graham Bell

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Scottish-born inventor, scientist and engineer who is credited with patenting the first practical telephone.

Scottish-born inventor, scientist and engineer who is credited with patenting the first practical telephone.

Bell c. undefined 1917
Melville House, the Bells' first home in North America, now a National Historic Site of Canada
Bell, top right, providing pedagogical instruction to teachers at the Boston School for Deaf Mutes, 1871. Throughout his life, he referred to himself as "a teacher of the deaf".
Alexander Graham Bell's telephone patent drawing, March 7, 1876
The master telephone patent, 174465, March 7, 1876
An actor playing Bell in a 1926 film holds Bell's first telephone transmitter
Bell at the opening of the long-distance line from New York to Chicago in 1892
Alexander Graham Bell, his wife Mabel Gardiner Hubbard, and their daughters Elsie (left) and Marian ca. 1885
The Brodhead–Bell mansion, the Bell family residence in Washington, D.C., from 1882 to 1889
Alexander Graham Bell in his later years
Photophone receiver, one half of Bell's wireless optical communication system, ca. 1880
Bell's HD-4 on a test run ca. 1919
AEA Silver Dart ca. 1909
Bell statue by A. E. Cleeve Horne in front of the Bell Telephone Building of Brantford, Ontario, The Telephone City. (Brantford Heritage Inventory, City of Brantford)
A quote by Alexander Graham Bell engraved in the stone wall within the Peace Chapel of the International Peace Garden (in Manitoba Canada and North Dakota, USA).
The Bell Museum, Cape Breton, part of the Alexander Graham Bell National Historic Site
A.G. Bell issue of 1940
Bell, an alumnus of the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, receiving an honorary Doctor of Laws degree (LL.D.) at the university in 1906

Many other inventions marked Bell's later life, including groundbreaking work in optical telecommunications, hydrofoils, and aeronautics.

"Casey" Baldwin at Ridley College, circa 1900

Frederick Walker Baldwin

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"Casey" Baldwin at Ridley College, circa 1900
Aerial Experiment Association. Casey (second from right), Bell (centre), McCurdy, Curtis, and Selfridge

Frederick Walker Baldwin (January 2, 1882 – August 7, 1948), also known as Casey Baldwin, paternal grandson of Canadian reform leader Robert Baldwin, was a hydrofoil and aviation pioneer and partner of the famous inventor Alexander Graham Bell.

HD-4 hydrofoil at the Alexander Graham Bell museum

HD-4

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HD-4 hydrofoil at the Alexander Graham Bell museum

HD-4 or Hydrodome number 4 was an early research hydrofoil watercraft developed by the scientist Alexander Graham Bell.

Examples of airfoils in nature and in or on various vehicles. The dolphin flipper at bottom left obeys the same principles in a different fluid medium; it is an example of a hydrofoil.

Airfoil

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Cross-sectional shape of an object whose motion through a gas is capable of generating significant lift, such as a wing, a sail, or the blades of propeller, rotor, or turbine.

Cross-sectional shape of an object whose motion through a gas is capable of generating significant lift, such as a wing, a sail, or the blades of propeller, rotor, or turbine.

Examples of airfoils in nature and in or on various vehicles. The dolphin flipper at bottom left obeys the same principles in a different fluid medium; it is an example of a hydrofoil.
Streamlines around a NACA 0012 airfoil at moderate angle of attack
Lift and drag curves for a typical airfoil
Airfoil nomenclature
Different definitions of airfoil thickness
An airfoil designed for winglets (PSU 90-125WL)
An airfoil section is displayed at the tip of this Denney Kitfox aircraft, built in 1991.
Airfoil of a Kamov Ka-26 helicopter's lower rotor blade

Foils of similar function designed with water as the working fluid are called hydrofoils.

The second and larger home, Beinn Bhreagh Hall (known locally as "The Point") was built in 1893 on the Beinn Bhreagh Estate of Alexander Graham & Mabel Bell at Baddeck, Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia.

Beinn Bhreagh

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Name of the former estate of Alexander Graham Bell, in Victoria County, Nova Scotia.

Name of the former estate of Alexander Graham Bell, in Victoria County, Nova Scotia.

The second and larger home, Beinn Bhreagh Hall (known locally as "The Point") was built in 1893 on the Beinn Bhreagh Estate of Alexander Graham & Mabel Bell at Baddeck, Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia.
{{lang|gd|Beinn Bhreagh|italic=no}}'s little harbor offered the Bells opportunities for recreation, and later a shelter area for experiments in aviation and hydrofoils.
Alexander Graham Bell relaxing on {{lang|gd|Beinn Bhreagh|italic=no}} with three of his granddaughters.
Mabel and Alexander Graham Bell were depicted in a postcard walking in front of their home, {{lang|gd|Beinn Bhreagh|italic=no}} Hall.
Red Head Point and the peninsula of {{lang|gd|Beinn Bhreagh|italic=no}} can be seen across the bay from the town of Baddeck, Nova Scotia in a 1906 postcard.
The town of Baddeck can be seen from one of the lookouts on {{lang|gd|Beinn Bhreagh|italic=no}} in a postcard from the 1920s.

Bell constructed a laboratory and boatyard on this property, conducting experiments in powered flight and hydrofoil technology, among many other things.

A swept wing KC-10 Extender (top) refuels a trapezoidal-wing F-22 Raptor.

Wing

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Type of fin that produces lift while moving through air or some other fluid.

Type of fin that produces lift while moving through air or some other fluid.

A swept wing KC-10 Extender (top) refuels a trapezoidal-wing F-22 Raptor.
A white stork flying by flapping its wings.
Condensation in the low pressure region over the wing of an Airbus A340, passing through humid air
Flaps (green) are used in various configurations to increase the wing area and to increase the lift. In conjunction with spoilers (red), flaps maximize drag and minimize lift during the landing roll.
The wing of a landing BMI Airbus A319-100. The slats at its leading edge and the flaps at its trailing edge are extended.
Winged tree seeds that cause autorotation in descent
A laughing gull, exhibiting the "gull wing" outline
Bat in flight

Lifting structures used in water include various foils, such as hydrofoils.

The 1902 Wright Glider shows its lift by pulling up

Lift (force)

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Object exerts a force on it.

Object exerts a force on it.

The 1902 Wright Glider shows its lift by pulling up
Lift is defined as the component of the aerodynamic force that is perpendicular to the flow direction, and drag is the component that is parallel to the flow direction.
A cross-section of a wing defines an airfoil shape.
When an airfoil generates lift, it deflects air downwards, and to do this it must exert a downward force on the air. Newton's third law requires that the air must exert an equal upward force on the airfoil.
An illustration of the incorrect equal transit-time explanation of airfoil lift.
Streamlines and streamtubes around an airfoil generating lift. Note the narrower streamtubes above and the wider streamtubes below.
Angle of attack of an airfoil
An airfoil with camber compared to a symmetrical airfoil
Airflow separating from a wing at a high angle of attack
Flow around an airfoil: the dots move with the flow. The black dots are on time slices, which split into two – an upper and lower part – at the leading edge. A marked speed difference between the upper-and lower-surface streamlines is shown most clearly in the image animation, with the upper markers arriving at the trailing edge long before the lower ones. Colors of the dots indicate streamlines.
Pressure field around an airfoil. The lines are isobars of equal pressure along their length. The arrows show the pressure differential from high (red) to low (blue) and hence also the net force which causes the air to accelerate in that direction.
Comparison of a non-lifting flow pattern around an airfoil; and a lifting flow pattern consistent with the Kutta condition in which the flow leaves the trailing edge smoothly
Circulation component of the flow around an airfoil
Cross-section of an airplane wing-body combination showing the isobars of the three-dimensional lifting flow
Cross-section of an airplane wing-body combination showing velocity vectors of the three-dimensional lifting flow
Euler computation of a tip vortex rolling up from the trailed vorticity sheet
Planview of a wing showing the horseshoe vortex system
Control volumes of different shapes that have been used in analyzing the momentum balance in the 2D flow around a lifting airfoil. The airfoil is assumed to exert a downward force −L' per unit span on the air, and the proportions in which that force is manifested as momentum fluxes and pressure differences at the outer boundary are indicated for each different shape of control volume.
Illustration of the distribution of higher-than-ambient pressure on the ground under an airplane in subsonic flight

Lift is mostly associated with the wings of fixed-wing aircraft, although it is more widely generated by many other streamlined bodies such as propellers, kites, helicopter rotors, racing car wings, maritime sails, wind turbines, and by sailboat keels, ship's rudders, and hydrofoils in water.

Rostislav Alexeyev

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A-90 Orlyonok ("Eaglet") in Moscow.
Monument of Rostislav Alexeyev in Nizhny Novgorod, Bugrovskoye cemetery

Rostislav Evgenievich Alexeyev (Ростисла́в Евге́ньевич Алексе́ев; December 18, 1916 – February 9, 1980) was a Russian Soviet Director & Chief of Design known for his pioneering work on hydrofoil ships and ground effect vehicles.

Fukuoka

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Sixth-largest city in Japan, the second-largest port city after Yokohama, and the capital city of Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan.

Sixth-largest city in Japan, the second-largest port city after Yokohama, and the capital city of Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan.

Satellite photo of Fukuoka
Fukuoka MEA
ACROS Fukuoka
Canal City Hakata
Tōchō-ji
Hakata Ramen
Fukuoka City Museum
Hakata Gion Yamakasa
International terminal of Fukuoka Airport
Bayside Place Hakata Port
Fukuoka PayPay Dome
Level-5 Stadium
Hakozaki-gū
Dazaifu
Korokan
Takezaki Suenaga
Genkō Bōrui
Kuroda Nagamasa
Fukuoka and Hakata, c.1640
Chikuzen Province(Famous Views of the Sixty-odd Provinces)
Fukuoka Castle
Kyushu University (Former Imperial University)
Fukuoka war damage monument
Skyline of Fukuoka
View from Fukuoka Tower
Seaside Momochi aerial view
Tenjin area
Fukuoka Tower
JR Kyushu's Hakata Station
Ōhori Park
Tenjin Underground City
The uniform used during the ceremonies and preparation.
The uniform used during the competition.

JR Kyushu and a Korean company operate hydrofoil ferries (named Beetle and Kobee) between Hakata and Busan, South Korea.

Rheinpfeil in Rhein, now Raketa 72, Rotterdam

Raketa (hydrofoil)

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Rheinpfeil in Rhein, now Raketa 72, Rotterdam
Raketa 69 in Bor
Raketa 246 in Moscow
Raketa 246 in Moscow
Raketa 205 in Kineshma
Raketa-7 in Vilkovo, 2003, retired
Raketa hydrofoil passes by Kstovo on the Volga River.

Raketa (Раке́та, Rocket) was the first type of hydrofoil boats commercially produced in the Soviet Union.