Hygroscopy

hygroscopicdeliquescenthygroscopicitydeliquescencenonhygroscopicnon-hygroscopicabsorb moistureabsorb waterabsorbs moistureabsorbs water from the air
Hygroscopy is the phenomenon of attracting and holding water molecules via either absorption or adsorption from the surrounding environment, which is usually at normal or room temperature.wikipedia
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Glycerol

glyceringlycerineE422
Hygroscopic substances include cellulose fibers (such as cotton and paper), sugar, caramel, honey, glycerol, ethanol, wood, methanol, sulfuric acid, many fertilizer chemicals, many salts (like calcium chloride, bases like sodium hydroxide etc.), and a wide variety of other substances.
Owing to the presence of three hydroxyl groups, glycerol is miscible with water and is hygroscopic nature.

Hygrometer

psychrometersling psychrometerhumidity
Nowadays an instrument for measuring humidity is called a hygrometer (hygro- + -meter).
The hair is hygroscopic (tending toward retaining moisture); its length changes with humidity, and the length change may be magnified by a mechanism and indicated on a dial or scale.

Sulfuric acid

sulphuric acidsulfuricH 2 SO 4
Hygroscopic substances include cellulose fibers (such as cotton and paper), sugar, caramel, honey, glycerol, ethanol, wood, methanol, sulfuric acid, many fertilizer chemicals, many salts (like calcium chloride, bases like sodium hydroxide etc.), and a wide variety of other substances. Owing to their very high affinity for water, these substances are often used as desiccants, also an application for concentrated sulfuric and phosphoric acids.
It is also hygroscopic, readily absorbing water vapor from the air.

Zinc chloride

ZnCl 2 chloride of zinczinc(II) chloride
Zinc chloride and calcium chloride, as well as potassium hydroxide and sodium hydroxide (and many different salts), are so hygroscopic that they readily dissolve in the water they absorb: this property is called deliquescence. Most deliquescent materials are salts, including calcium chloride, magnesium chloride, zinc chloride, ferric chloride, carnallite, potassium carbonate, potassium phosphate, ferric ammonium citrate, ammonium nitrate, potassium hydroxide, and sodium hydroxide.
ZnCl 2 itself is hygroscopic and even deliquescent.

Wood

heartwoodwoodensapwood
Hygroscopic substances include cellulose fibers (such as cotton and paper), sugar, caramel, honey, glycerol, ethanol, wood, methanol, sulfuric acid, many fertilizer chemicals, many salts (like calcium chloride, bases like sodium hydroxide etc.), and a wide variety of other substances.
Wood is a heterogeneous, hygroscopic, cellular and anisotropic material.

Calcium chloride

CaCl 2 calciumanhydrous calcium chloride
Zinc chloride and calcium chloride, as well as potassium hydroxide and sodium hydroxide (and many different salts), are so hygroscopic that they readily dissolve in the water they absorb: this property is called deliquescence. Most deliquescent materials are salts, including calcium chloride, magnesium chloride, zinc chloride, ferric chloride, carnallite, potassium carbonate, potassium phosphate, ferric ammonium citrate, ammonium nitrate, potassium hydroxide, and sodium hydroxide.
Because the anhydrous salt is hygroscopic, it is used as a desiccant.

Honey

bee honeyforest honeyheather honey
Hygroscopic substances include cellulose fibers (such as cotton and paper), sugar, caramel, honey, glycerol, ethanol, wood, methanol, sulfuric acid, many fertilizer chemicals, many salts (like calcium chloride, bases like sodium hydroxide etc.), and a wide variety of other substances. Sugars such as honey, brown sugar, and molasses are examples of sweeteners used to create more moist, chewy cakes.
Honey has the ability to absorb moisture directly from the air, a phenomenon called hygroscopy.

Potassium hydroxide

KOHcaustic potashpotassium
Zinc chloride and calcium chloride, as well as potassium hydroxide and sodium hydroxide (and many different salts), are so hygroscopic that they readily dissolve in the water they absorb: this property is called deliquescence. Most deliquescent materials are salts, including calcium chloride, magnesium chloride, zinc chloride, ferric chloride, carnallite, potassium carbonate, potassium phosphate, ferric ammonium citrate, ammonium nitrate, potassium hydroxide, and sodium hydroxide.
Potassium hydroxide is usually sold as translucent pellets, which become tacky in air because KOH is hygroscopic.

Humectant

humectantsanti-caking agentholds moisture
When added to foods or other materials for the express purpose of maintaining moisture content, such substances are known as humectants.
A humectant is a hygroscopic substance used to keep things moist.

Sodium hydroxide

caustic sodaNaOHsodium
Zinc chloride and calcium chloride, as well as potassium hydroxide and sodium hydroxide (and many different salts), are so hygroscopic that they readily dissolve in the water they absorb: this property is called deliquescence. Most deliquescent materials are salts, including calcium chloride, magnesium chloride, zinc chloride, ferric chloride, carnallite, potassium carbonate, potassium phosphate, ferric ammonium citrate, ammonium nitrate, potassium hydroxide, and sodium hydroxide.
However, sodium hydroxide is not used as a primary standard because it is hygroscopic and absorbs carbon dioxide from air.

Ethanol

alcoholbioethanolethyl alcohol
Hygroscopic substances include cellulose fibers (such as cotton and paper), sugar, caramel, honey, glycerol, ethanol, wood, methanol, sulfuric acid, many fertilizer chemicals, many salts (like calcium chloride, bases like sodium hydroxide etc.), and a wide variety of other substances.
Hydrogen bonding causes pure ethanol to be hygroscopic to the extent that it readily absorbs water from the air.

Carnallite

carnalitemagnesium potassium trichloride
Most deliquescent materials are salts, including calcium chloride, magnesium chloride, zinc chloride, ferric chloride, carnallite, potassium carbonate, potassium phosphate, ferric ammonium citrate, ammonium nitrate, potassium hydroxide, and sodium hydroxide.
The mineral is deliquescent (absorbs moisture from the surrounding air) and specimens must be stored in an airtight container.

Desiccant

drying agentdesiccantsdryers
Owing to their very high affinity for water, these substances are often used as desiccants, also an application for concentrated sulfuric and phosphoric acids.
A desiccant is a hygroscopic substance that is used to induce or sustain a state of dryness (desiccation) in its vicinity; it is the opposite of a humectant.

Potassium carbonate

pearlashK 2 CO 3 potassium
Most deliquescent materials are salts, including calcium chloride, magnesium chloride, zinc chloride, ferric chloride, carnallite, potassium carbonate, potassium phosphate, ferric ammonium citrate, ammonium nitrate, potassium hydroxide, and sodium hydroxide.
It is deliquescent, often appearing as a damp or wet solid.

Hydrophile

hydrophilichydrophilicityHydrophilia
If a compound dissolves in water, then it is considered to be hydrophilic.
* Hygroscopic

Brown sugar

raw sugarDemerara sugarturbinado sugar
Sugars such as honey, brown sugar, and molasses are examples of sweeteners used to create more moist, chewy cakes.
The product is naturally moist from the hygroscopic nature of the molasses and is often labelled as "soft."

Thorny devil

Moloch horridusMolochThorny dragon
Thorny dragons collect moisture in the dry desert via nighttime condensation of dew that forms on their skin and is channeled to their mouths in hygroscopic grooves between the spines of their skin.
Then the dew is channeled to its mouth in hygroscopic grooves between its spines.

Nylon

Bri-Nylonnylon 6,6Nylons
Many engineering polymers are hygroscopic, including nylon, ABS, polycarbonate, cellulose, and poly(methyl methacrylate).
However, polyamide is hygroscopic.

Water

H 2 OHOliquid water
Hygroscopy is the phenomenon of attracting and holding water molecules via either absorption or adsorption from the surrounding environment, which is usually at normal or room temperature.

Molecule

molecularmoleculesmolecular structure
Hygroscopy is the phenomenon of attracting and holding water molecules via either absorption or adsorption from the surrounding environment, which is usually at normal or room temperature.

Absorption (chemistry)

absorptionabsorbentabsorbed
Hygroscopy is the phenomenon of attracting and holding water molecules via either absorption or adsorption from the surrounding environment, which is usually at normal or room temperature.

Adsorption

adsorbedadsorbadsorbent
Hygroscopy is the phenomenon of attracting and holding water molecules via either absorption or adsorption from the surrounding environment, which is usually at normal or room temperature.

Natural environment

environmentenvironmentalpaleoenvironment
Hygroscopy is the phenomenon of attracting and holding water molecules via either absorption or adsorption from the surrounding environment, which is usually at normal or room temperature.

Classical compound

combining formscombining formneoclassical compound
The word hygroscopy uses combining forms of hygro- and -scopy.