HyperCard

cardsCasino ColumnsHypercard stacksTileStack
HyperCard is a software application and development kit for Apple Macintosh and Apple IIGS computers.wikipedia
245 Related Articles

HyperTalk

XCMD
HyperCard includes a built-in programming language called HyperTalk for manipulating data and the user interface.
HyperTalk was a high-level, procedural programming language created in 1987 by Dan Winkler and used in conjunction with Apple Computer's HyperCard hypermedia program by Bill Atkinson.

Hypermedia

hypermedia.media
It is among the first successful hypermedia systems predating the World Wide Web.
Bill Atkinson's HyperCard popularized hypermedia writing, while a variety of literary hypertext and hypertext works, fiction and non-fiction, demonstrated the promise of links.

World Wide Web

WebWWWthe web
It is among the first successful hypermedia systems predating the World Wide Web.
Unlike predecessors such as HyperCard, the World Wide Web was non-proprietary, making it possible to develop servers and clients independently and to add extensions without licensing restrictions.

Macintosh

Apple MacintoshMacMacs
HyperCard is a software application and development kit for Apple Macintosh and Apple IIGS computers.
In August 1987, Apple unveiled HyperCard and MultiFinder, which added cooperative multitasking to the Macintosh.

Macworld/iWorld

Macworld ExpoMacworld Conference & ExpoMacworld
Apple timed its release to coincide with the MacWorld Conference & Expo in Boston, Massachusetts to guarantee maximum publicity.
The most significant product introduction at the show was Bill Atkinson's HyperCard.

Bill Atkinson

HyperCard was created by Bill Atkinson following an LSD trip.
Atkinson also conceived, designed and implemented HyperCard, the first popular hypermedia system.

Myst

realMystMyst Masterpiece EditionMyst'' clone
Nonetheless, HyperCard continued to be popular and used for a widening range of applications, from the game The Manhole, an earlier effort by the creators of Myst, to corporate information services. Several commercial software products were created in HyperCard, most notably the original version of the interactive game narrative Myst, the Voyager Company's Expanded Books, multimedia CD-ROMs of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony CD-ROM, A Hard Day's Night by the Beatles, and the Voyager MacBeth.
Rand approached his brother with the idea of making an interactive storybook using HyperCard.

SuperCard

Without several important, basic features, HyperCard authors began moving to systems such as SuperCard and Macromedia Authorware.
It is inspired by HyperCard, but includes a richer language, a full GUI toolkit, and native color (as opposed to HyperCard's Apple- or third-party-supplied add-ons).

Creator code

creatorcreator (application) informationcreator signature
Work for it began in March 1985 under the name of WildCard (hence its creator code of WILD).
For example, the creator code of the HyperCard application and its associated "stacks" is represented in ASCII as WILD.

Dan Quine

Dan CrowDan Crow (computer scientist)
Under the leadership of Dan Crow development continued through the late 1990s, with public demos showing many popular features such as color support, Internet connectivity, and the ability to play HyperCard stacks (which were now special QuickTime movies) in a web browser.
He was also manager of the Hypercard engineering team and the QuickTime applications team.

Danny Goodman

Changing its name to Mediagenic, it published several major HyperCard-based applications, most notably Danny Goodman's Focal Point, a personal information manager, and Reports For HyperCard, a program by Nine To Five Software that allows users to treat HyperCard as a full database system with robust information viewing and printing features.
He is best known as the author of The Complete HyperCard Handbook (1987, Bantam Books, 650,000 copies in print), The JavaScript Bible (1996, IDG Books, 500,000 copies in print), and Dynamic HTML (1998, O'Reilly & Associates, 100,000 copies in print).

Plug-in (computing)

plug-inpluginplugins
These are code libraries packaged in a resource fork that integrate into either the system generally or the HyperTalk language specifically; this is an early example of the plug-in concept.
HyperCard supported a similar facility, but more commonly included the plug-in code in the HyperCard documents (called stacks) themselves.

Claris

FileMaker Inc.CDMLFileMaker
Then, Apple decided that most of its application software packages, including HyperCard, would be the property of a wholly owned subsidiary called Claris.
By the late 1980s, HyperCard needed updating as well but Apple management did not see any value in the product and let it wither.

QuickTime

QuickTime PlayerQuickTime XApple QuickTime
Because of the product's widespread use as a multimedia-authoring tool it was rolled into the QuickTime group.
The QuickTime interactive movie was to have been the playback format for the next generation of HyperCard authoring tool.

Adobe Authorware

AuthorwareMacromedia AuthorwareAuthorware 7
Without several important, basic features, HyperCard authors began moving to systems such as SuperCard and Macromedia Authorware.
Xtras, or add-ins, can also be used to extend the functionality of Authorware, which is similar to HyperCard's XCMDs.

Beethoven's Ninth Symphony CD-ROM

CD-ROM
Several commercial software products were created in HyperCard, most notably the original version of the interactive game narrative Myst, the Voyager Company's Expanded Books, multimedia CD-ROMs of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony CD-ROM, A Hard Day's Night by the Beatles, and the Voyager MacBeth.
This title, a companion to Beethoven's Symphony No. 9, was developed in 1989 by the Voyager Company in Apple Computer's HyperCard, using custom audio XCMDs developed at Voyager.

Whole Earth Catalog

The Whole Earth CatalogWhole EarthThe Last Whole Earth Catalog
An early electronic edition of the Whole Earth Catalog was implemented in HyperCard.
In 1986, The Essential Whole Earth Catalog (ISBN: 0-385-23641-7) was published, and in 1988 the WEC was published on CD-ROM using an early form of hypertext developed by Apple Computer called HyperCard.

AppleScript

Open Scripting ArchitectureAppleScript StudioJavaScript for Automation
Apple built its system-wide scripting engine AppleScript on a language similar to HyperTalk; it is often used for desktop publishing (DTP) workflow automation needs.
In the late 1980s Apple considered using HyperCard's HyperTalk scripting language as the standard language for end-user development across the company and within its classic Mac OS operating system, and for interprocess communication between Apple and non-Apple products.

LiveCode

TranscriptLiveCode ScriptLiveCode Transcript
LiveCode (formerly Revolution and MetaCard ) is a cross-platform rapid application development runtime environment inspired by HyperCard.

ViolaWWW

ViolaViola browser
It was also a key inspiration for ViolaWWW, an early web browser.
Pei's interest in graphically based software began with HyperCard, which he first encountered in 1989.

WinPlus

PLUS
WinPlus, originally Plus, was a cross-platform clone of the HyperCard application that enabled users to run HyperCard stacks on Apple Macintosh, Microsoft Windows and OS/2 Presentation Manager.

Oracle Media Objects

Oracle CardOracle cards
Oracle offered an XCMD that allows HyperCard to directly query Oracle databases on any platform, superseded by Oracle Card.
Oracle Media Objects, formerly Oracle Card, was a software development tool for developing multi-media applications, with functionality and appearance similar to Apple Computer' HyperCard.

Hypertext

hypertextualityhypertext markupmetatext
HyperCard is one of the first products that made use of and popularized the hypertext concept to a large popular base of users.
In August 1987, Apple Computer released HyperCard for the Macintosh line at the MacWorld convention.

HyperNext

It was inspired by HyperCard and includes a GUI having controls such as buttons and listboxes, and an interpreted English-like programming language.

John Sculley

SculleyJohn Scully
in 1998 Steve Jobs disliked the software because Atkinson had chosen to stay at Apple to finish it instead of joining Jobs at NeXT, and (according to Atkinson) "it had Sculley's stink all over it".
Before speaking at the Silicon Valley 4.0 conference, Sculley was interviewed by CNET in October 2003, where he explained the mistakes he made at Apple concerning the Apple Newton and HyperCard.