HyperTalk

XCMD
HyperTalk was a high-level, procedural programming language created in 1987 by Dan Winkler and used in conjunction with Apple Computer's HyperCard hypermedia program by Bill Atkinson.wikipedia
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HyperCard

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HyperTalk was a high-level, procedural programming language created in 1987 by Dan Winkler and used in conjunction with Apple Computer's HyperCard hypermedia program by Bill Atkinson.
HyperCard includes a built-in programming language called HyperTalk for manipulating data and the user interface.

SuperCard

The company did not oppose the development of imitations like SuperCard, but it created the HyperTalk Standards Committee to avoid incompatibility between language variants.
The programming language used by SuperCard is called SuperTalk, and is largely based on HyperTalk, the language in HyperCard.

XTalk

These clones and dialects (commonly referred to under the moniker of xTalk-languages) added various features to the language that are expected from a modern programming language, like exception handling, user-defined object properties, timers, multi-threading and even user-defined objects.
The mother of all xTalk languages is HyperTalk, the language used by Apple's HyperCard environment.

SenseTalk

SenseTalk is an English-like scripting language derived from the HyperTalk language used in HyperCard.

ActionScript

ActionScript 3ActionScript 3.0object-oriented programming language
It is influenced by HyperTalk, the scripting language for HyperCard.

LiveCode

TranscriptLiveCode ScriptLiveCode Transcript
It features the LiveCode Script (formerly MetaTalk) programming language which belongs to the family of xTalk scripting languages like HyperCard's HyperTalk.

AppleScript

Open Scripting ArchitectureAppleScript StudioJavaScript for Automation
In the late 1980s Apple considered using HyperCard's HyperTalk scripting language as the standard language for end-user development across the company and within its classic Mac OS operating system, and for interprocess communication between Apple and non-Apple products.

ToolBook

Although Asymetrix ToolBook is often also considered a HyperCard clone, its scripting language apparently bears little resemblance to HyperTalk.

Lingo (programming language)

Lingo
Users could write HyperTalk-like sentences such as:

Programming language

programming languageslanguagedialect
HyperTalk was a high-level, procedural programming language created in 1987 by Dan Winkler and used in conjunction with Apple Computer's HyperCard hypermedia program by Bill Atkinson.

Apple Inc.

AppleApple ComputerApple Inc
HyperTalk was a high-level, procedural programming language created in 1987 by Dan Winkler and used in conjunction with Apple Computer's HyperCard hypermedia program by Bill Atkinson.

Bill Atkinson

HyperTalk was a high-level, procedural programming language created in 1987 by Dan Winkler and used in conjunction with Apple Computer's HyperCard hypermedia program by Bill Atkinson.

Scripting language

scriptingscriptscripts
Because the main target audience of HyperTalk was beginning programmers, HyperTalk programmers were usually called "authors" and the process of writing programs "scripting".

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
HyperTalk scripts resembled written English and used a logical structure similar to that of the Pascal programming language.

Pascal (programming language)

PascalPascal programming languageISO 7185
HyperTalk scripts resembled written English and used a logical structure similar to that of the Pascal programming language.

Procedural programming

proceduralprocedural languageprocedural code
HyperTalk was a high-level, procedural programming language created in 1987 by Dan Winkler and used in conjunction with Apple Computer's HyperCard hypermedia program by Bill Atkinson.

Data type

typedatatypetypes
Data types usually did not need to be specified by the programmer; conversion happened transparently in the background between strings and numbers.

String (computer science)

stringstringscharacter string
Data types usually did not need to be specified by the programmer; conversion happened transparently in the background between strings and numbers.

Class (computer programming)

classclassesPartial class
There were no classes or data structures in the traditional sense; in their place were special string literals, or "lists" of "items" delimited by commas (in later versions the "itemDelimiter" property allowed choosing an arbitrary character).

Data structure

data structuresstructurestructures
There were no classes or data structures in the traditional sense; in their place were special string literals, or "lists" of "items" delimited by commas (in later versions the "itemDelimiter" property allowed choosing an arbitrary character).

String literal

stringraw stringliteral string
There were no classes or data structures in the traditional sense; in their place were special string literals, or "lists" of "items" delimited by commas (in later versions the "itemDelimiter" property allowed choosing an arbitrary character).