Hypomania

hypomanichypomanic episodeHypermaniamanicelationhypomanic stagesmarkedly elevated mood
Hypomania (literally "under mania" or "less than mania") is a mood state characterized by persistent disinhibition and mood elevation (euphoria), with behavior that is noticeably different from the person's typical behavior when in a non-depressed state.wikipedia
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Mania

manicmanic episodemanic episodes
Hypomania (literally "under mania" or "less than mania") is a mood state characterized by persistent disinhibition and mood elevation (euphoria), with behavior that is noticeably different from the person's typical behavior when in a non-depressed state. It may involve irritability, but less severely than full mania.
They are most plainly evident in fully developed hypomanic states; in full-blown mania, however, they undergo progressively severe exacerbations and become more and more obscured by other signs and symptoms, such as delusions and fragmentation of behavior.

Bipolar II disorder

bipolar IIbipolarII
Hypomania is a feature of bipolar II disorder and cyclothymia, but can also occur in schizoaffective disorder.
Bipolar II disorder is a bipolar spectrum disorder (see also: Bipolar I disorder) characterized by at least one episode of hypomania and at least one episode of major depression.

Cyclothymia

cyclothymiccyclothymic disorderAffective personality disorder
Hypomania is a feature of bipolar II disorder and cyclothymia, but can also occur in schizoaffective disorder. Cyclothymia, a condition of continuous mood fluctuations, is characterized by oscillating experiences of hypomania and depression that fail to meet the diagnostic criteria for either manic or major depressive episodes.
Cyclothymia, also known as cyclothymic disorder, is a mental disorder that involves periods of symptoms of depression and periods of symptoms of hypomania.

Grandiosity

grandiosegrandiose selfaggrandising
Other symptoms related to this may include feelings of grandiosity, distractibility, and hypersexuality.
The personality trait of grandiosity is principally associated with narcissistic personality disorder (NPD), but also is a feature in the occurrence and expression of antisocial personality disorder, and the manic and hypomanic episodes of bipolar disorder.

Schizoaffective disorder

schizoaffectiveschizoaffective disordersschizo-affective disorder
Hypomania is a feature of bipolar II disorder and cyclothymia, but can also occur in schizoaffective disorder.
There are two types of schizoaffective disorder: the bipolar type, which is distinguished by symptoms of mania, hypomania, or mixed episode; and the depressive type, which is distinguished by symptoms of depression only.

Bipolar I disorder

bipolar IBipolar 1 Disorderbipolar
Hypomania is also a feature of bipolar I disorder; it arises in sequential procession as the mood disorder fluctuates between normal mood (euthymia) and mania.
Most people also, at other times, have one or more depressive episodes, and all experience a hypomanic stage before progressing to full mania.

Hyperthymic temperament

Hyperthymia
People who experience hyperthymia, or "chronic hypomania", encounter the same symptoms as hypomania but on a longer-term basis.
Hyperthymia is similar to but more stable than hypomania with complete absence of irritability or negative mood effects.

Hypersexuality

nymphomaniachypersexualsatyriasis
Other symptoms related to this may include feelings of grandiosity, distractibility, and hypersexuality.
As defined in the DSM-IV-TR, hypersexuality can be a symptom of hypomania or mania in bipolar disorder or schizoaffective disorder.

Euphoria

euphoriceuphorianthigh
Hypomania (literally "under mania" or "less than mania") is a mood state characterized by persistent disinhibition and mood elevation (euphoria), with behavior that is noticeably different from the person's typical behavior when in a non-depressed state. When manic episodes are separated into stages of a progression according to symptomatic severity and associated features, hypomania constitutes the first stage of the syndrome, wherein the cardinal features (euphoria or heightened irritability, pressure of speech and activity, increased energy, decreased need for sleep, and flight of ideas) are most plainly evident.
Euphoria is also strongly associated with both hypomania and mania, mental states characterized by a pathological heightening of mood, which may be either euphoric or irritable, in addition to other symptoms, such as pressured speech, flight of ideas, and grandiosity.

Mood (psychology)

moodmoodsatmosphere
Hypomania (literally "under mania" or "less than mania") is a mood state characterized by persistent disinhibition and mood elevation (euphoria), with behavior that is noticeably different from the person's typical behavior when in a non-depressed state.

Pressure of speech

pressured speechspeaking in a rapid, uninterruptible manner
When manic episodes are separated into stages of a progression according to symptomatic severity and associated features, hypomania constitutes the first stage of the syndrome, wherein the cardinal features (euphoria or heightened irritability, pressure of speech and activity, increased energy, decreased need for sleep, and flight of ideas) are most plainly evident.
Pressure of speech usually refers to the improperly verbalized speech which is a feature of hypomanic and manic illness.

Lamotrigine

Lamictal
According to studies in 2007, lamotrigine may treat bipolar depression without triggering mania, hypomania, mixed states, or rapid-cycling.

Disinhibition

disinhibiteddisinhibitoryloss of inhibition
Hypomania (literally "under mania" or "less than mania") is a mood state characterized by persistent disinhibition and mood elevation (euphoria), with behavior that is noticeably different from the person's typical behavior when in a non-depressed state.

Irritability

agitationirritationHyperirritability
It may involve irritability, but less severely than full mania.

DSM-5

DSM-Vmental health disordersDiagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
According to DSM-5 criteria, hypomania is distinct from mania in that there is no significant functional impairment; mania, by DSM-5 definition, does include significant functional impairment and may have psychotic features.

Psychosis

psychoticpsychosespsychotic break
According to DSM-5 criteria, hypomania is distinct from mania in that there is no significant functional impairment; mania, by DSM-5 definition, does include significant functional impairment and may have psychotic features.

Distraction

distractedDiversiondistractibility
Other symptoms related to this may include feelings of grandiosity, distractibility, and hypersexuality.

Sociality

gregarioussocial animalsolitary
Individuals in a hypomanic state have a decreased need for sleep, are extremely gregarious and competitive, and have a great deal of energy.

Competition

competitorcompetitionscompetitive
Individuals in a hypomanic state have a decreased need for sleep, are extremely gregarious and competitive, and have a great deal of energy.

List of people with bipolar disorder

People with bipolar disorder
Numerous people with bipolar disorder have credited hypomania with giving them an edge in their theater of work.

Depression (mood)

depressiondepressedmelancholy
Cyclothymia, a condition of continuous mood fluctuations, is characterized by oscillating experiences of hypomania and depression that fail to meet the diagnostic criteria for either manic or major depressive episodes.

Kindling model

kindlingkindling hypothesispicrotoxin-kindled model
(See also, Kindling model)

Adrenergic

beta-adrenergicadrenergic agentsβ-adrenergic
Given that norepinephrine and dopaminergic drugs are capable of triggering hypomania, theories relating to monoamine hyperactivity have been proposed.

Dopamine

dopaminergic systemDAdopaminergic
Given that norepinephrine and dopaminergic drugs are capable of triggering hypomania, theories relating to monoamine hyperactivity have been proposed.

Narcissistic personality disorder

megalomanianarcissisticmegalomaniac
Hypomania can be associated with narcissistic personality disorder.