Hypotension

low blood pressurehypotensivelowdrop in blood pressurereduced blood pressuredecrease in blood pressureIntradialytic hypotensionlow blood-pressureOrthostatic hypotensiona decrease in blood pressure
Hypotension is low blood pressure, especially in the arteries of the left sided systemic circulation.wikipedia
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Blood pressure

systolic blood pressurediastolic blood pressurearterial blood pressure
Hypotension is low blood pressure, especially in the arteries of the left sided systemic circulation.
Blood pressure that is too low is called hypotension, and pressure that is consistently high is hypertension.

Syncope (medicine)

syncopefaintingfainted
If the blood pressure is sufficiently low, fainting may occur.
It is caused by a decrease in blood flow to the brain, typically from low blood pressure.

Shock (circulatory)

shockcirculatory shocktraumatic shock
Severely low blood pressure can deprive the brain and other vital organs of oxygen and nutrients, leading to a life-threatening condition called shock.
The heart rate divided by systolic blood pressure, known as the shock index (SI), of greater than 0.8 supports the diagnosis more than low blood pressure or a fast heart rate in isolation.

Allergy

allergiesallergic reactionallergic
Depending on the rate of severity, anaphylaxis can include skin reactions, bronchoconstriction, swelling, low blood pressure, coma, and death.

Hypovolemia

hemorrhagic shockhypovolemic shockvolume depletion
Reduced blood volume, hypovolemia, is the most common cause of hypotension.
These include oliguria, cyanosis, abdominal and chest pain, hypotension, tachycardia, cold hands and feet, and progressively altering mental status.

Dizziness

dizzydisequilibriumgiddiness
The primary symptoms of hypotension are lightheadedness or dizziness.

Hypertension

high blood pressurehypertensivearterial hypertension
Hypotension is the opposite of hypertension, which is high blood pressure.

Sepsis

septicaemiablood poisoningseptic
Excessive vasodilation can also result from sepsis, acidosis, or medications, such as nitrate preparations, calcium channel blockers, or AT1 receptor antagonists (Angiotensin II acts on AT1 receptors).
Insufficient blood flow may be evident by low blood pressure, high blood lactate, or low urine output.

Cardiogenic shock

cardiogenicCardiovascular collapseshock, cardiogenic
Decreased cardiac output despite normal blood volume, due to severe congestive heart failure, large myocardial infarction, heart valve problems, or extremely low heart rate (bradycardia), often produces hypotension and can rapidly progress to cardiogenic shock.
Cardiogenic shock is defined by sustained low blood pressure with tissue hypoperfusion despite adequate left ventricular filling pressure.

Shortness of breath

dyspnearespiratory distressdyspnoea
Signs that represent significant severity include hypotension, hypoxemia, tracheal deviation, altered mental status, unstable dysrhythmia, stridor, intercostal indrawing, cyanosis, tripod positioning, pronounced use of accessory muscles (sternocleidomastoid, scalenes) and absent breath sounds.

Alpha blocker

Alpha blockersalphaalpha-blockers
Chronic use of alpha blockers or beta blockers can lead to hypotension.
Patients who need alpha blockers for BPH, but have a history of hypotension or postural heart failure, should use these drugs with caution, as it may result in an even greater decrease in blood pressure or make heart failure even worse.

Chest pain

chest painschest tightnesschest
However, in the case of acute coronary syndrome, a third heart sound, diaphoresis, and hypotension are the most strongly associated physical exam findings.

Nitroglycerin (medication)

nitroglyceringlyceryl trinitratenitroglycerine
Excessive vasodilation can also result from sepsis, acidosis, or medications, such as nitrate preparations, calcium channel blockers, or AT1 receptor antagonists (Angiotensin II acts on AT1 receptors).
Common side effects include headache and low blood pressure.

Beta blocker

beta blockersbeta-blockersbeta-blocker
Chronic use of alpha blockers or beta blockers can lead to hypotension.
Adverse drug reactions associated with the use of beta blockers include: nausea, diarrhea, bronchospasm, dyspnea, cold extremities, exacerbation of Raynaud's syndrome, bradycardia, hypotension, heart failure, heart block, fatigue, dizziness, alopecia (hair loss), abnormal vision, hallucinations, insomnia, nightmares, sexual dysfunction, erectile dysfunction and/or alteration of glucose and lipid metabolism.

Myocardial infarction

heart attackheart attacksacute myocardial infarction
Decreased cardiac output despite normal blood volume, due to severe congestive heart failure, large myocardial infarction, heart valve problems, or extremely low heart rate (bradycardia), often produces hypotension and can rapidly progress to cardiogenic shock.
A myocardial infarction may result from a heart with a limited blood supply subject to increased oxygen demands, such as in fever, a fast heart rate, hyperthyroidism, too few red blood cells in the bloodstream, or low blood pressure.

Dysuria

painful urinationburning with urinationpain with urination

Flammer syndrome

Hypotension is a feature of Flammer syndrome, which is characterized by cold hands and feet and predisposes to normal tension glaucoma.
It can manifest itself in many symptoms such as cold hands and feet and is often associated with low blood pressure.

Spinal anaesthesia

spinal anesthesiaspinalspinal block
Many anesthetic agents and techniques, including spinal anesthesia and most inhalational agents, produce significant vasodilation.

Diuretic

diureticsdiuretic medicationsdiuretic use
Hypovolemia is often induced by excessive use of diuretics.

Antihypotensive agent

vasopressorvasopressorsantihypotensive
Treatment of hypotension may include the use of intravenous fluids or vasopressors.
An antihypotensive agent, also known as a vasopressor agent or simply vasopressor, or pressor, is any medication that tends to raise low blood pressure.

Septic shock

septicshockshock, septic
Septic shock is a potentially fatal medical condition that occurs when sepsis, which is organ injury or damage in response to infection, leads to dangerously low blood pressure and abnormalities in cellular metabolism.

Prandial

postprandialPreprandialpost-prandial
Another, but rarer form, is postprandial hypotension, a drastic decline in blood pressure that occurs 30 to 75 minutes after eating substantial meals.

Vasoconstriction

vasoconstrictorvasoconstrictivevasoconstricting
When a great deal of blood is diverted to the intestines (a kind of "splanchnic blood pooling") to facilitate digestion and absorption, the body must increase cardiac output and peripheral vasoconstriction to maintain enough blood pressure to perfuse vital organs, such as the brain.
Many are used in medicine to treat hypotension and as topical decongestants.

Adrenal insufficiency

adrenocortical insufficiencyadrenal suppressionhypoadrenalism
If not treated, adrenal insufficiency may result in abdominal pains, vomiting, muscle weakness and fatigue, depression, low blood pressure, weight loss, kidney failure, changes in mood and personality, and shock (adrenal crisis).

Intensive care medicine

intensive carecritical carecritical care medicine
Patients requiring intensive care may require support for cardiovascular instability (hypertension/hypotension), potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmias, airway or respiratory compromise (such as ventilator support), acute renal failure, or the cumulative effects of multiple organ failure, more commonly referred to now as multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.