Ištaran

IshtaranIštarān
Ištaran (also Gusilim ) was the local deity of the city of Der, a Sumerian city state positioned east of the Tigris on the border between Sumer and Elam.wikipedia
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Der (Sumer)

DerDērDur
Ištaran (also Gusilim ) was the local deity of the city of Der, a Sumerian city state positioned east of the Tigris on the border between Sumer and Elam.
The local deity of the city was named Ishtaran, represented on Earth by his minister, the snake god Nirah.

Nirah

The beast and symbol of Ištaran, as frequently represented on kudurrus, is a snake (presumably representing Nirah, the snake god who acted as Ištaran's minister).
In Sumerian religion, Nirah is the sukkal, or personal attendant, of Ištaran, the local god of the Sumerian city-state of Der.

Sumer

SumeriansSumeriaSumerian
Ištaran (also Gusilim ) was the local deity of the city of Der, a Sumerian city state positioned east of the Tigris on the border between Sumer and Elam.

Tigris

Tigris RiverRiver TigrisDijla
Ištaran (also Gusilim ) was the local deity of the city of Der, a Sumerian city state positioned east of the Tigris on the border between Sumer and Elam.

Elam

ElamitesSusianaElamite Empire
Ištaran (also Gusilim ) was the local deity of the city of Der, a Sumerian city state positioned east of the Tigris on the border between Sumer and Elam.

Cult (religious practice)

cultcultuscults
His cult flourished from the Early Dynastic III Period until the Middle Babylonian Period, after which his name is no longer attested in the personal names of individuals.

Kudurru

boundary stonesboundary stonekudurru'', "boundary-stone
The beast and symbol of Ištaran, as frequently represented on kudurrus, is a snake (presumably representing Nirah, the snake god who acted as Ištaran's minister).

Umma

Islamic worldTell Jokha
As early as the Early Dynastic period, Ištaran was being called upon as a god who might abjudicate in an inter-city border dispute between Umma and Lagaš.

Lagash

First Dynasty of LagashLagašKingdom of Lagash
As early as the Early Dynastic period, Ištaran was being called upon as a god who might abjudicate in an inter-city border dispute between Umma and Lagaš.

Gudea

Gudea of LagashKing GudeaGoudéa
His worship certainly spread beyond his own borders: perhaps in gratitude, Gudea, ruler of Lagaš, records his installation of a shrine to Ištaran in the great temple of Ningirsu at Girsu.

Girsu

TellohTello
His worship certainly spread beyond his own borders: perhaps in gratitude, Gudea, ruler of Lagaš, records his installation of a shrine to Ištaran in the great temple of Ningirsu at Girsu.

Serpent (symbolism)

serpentserpentsserpentine
In ancient Mesopotamia, Nirah, the messenger god of Ištaran, was represented as a serpent on kudurrus, or boundary stones.

Dumuzid

TammuzDumuziDumuzid the Shepherd
A ritual associated with the Ekur temple in Nippur equates Dumuzid with the snake-god Ištaran, who in that ritual, is described as having died.

List of Mesopotamian deities

ancient Mesopotamian godMesopotamian deitiesMesopotamian goddess

Snakes in mythology

cobra-stonesnake godThe Devil
In ancient Mesopotamia, Nirah, the messenger god of Ištaran, was represented as a serpent on kudurrus, or boundary stones.

Snake

snakesserpentSerpentes
In ancient Mesopotamia, Nirah, the messenger god of Ištaran, was represented as a serpent on kudurrus, or boundary stones.

Land grant to Ḫasardu kudurru

Several of the symbols are widely attested icons of their gods such as the lunar disc for Sîn, solar disc for Šamaš, the lightning-fork for Adad, the lamp for Nusku, the leaping dog for Gula, the mace with twin lion-heads for Nergal, the eagle-headed mace for Ninurta, the eight-pointed star for Ištar, and the coiled snake for Ištaran.